Home » People Can’t Stop Buying Nissan Rogues So They Made It Slightly Better, But Only Slightly

People Can’t Stop Buying Nissan Rogues So They Made It Slightly Better, But Only Slightly

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As I bit down into a quesadilla, a stray thought wandered across my prefrontal cortex: The Nissan Rogue crossover that everyone keeps buying is pretty good. It’s spacious, well-appointed, and offers enough unexpected features to fill a Costco-sized shopping cart, from available semi-aniline leather to an infotainment system that supports FLAC files. Hell, judging by year-to-date sales figures, Nissan sells a Rogue in America every one minute and 18 seconds. So why had I forgotten about it despite the Rogue being the best-selling Nissan in America and Canada? Is it because I don’t see many in my local area, or does every compact crossover have its Warhol moment before being swept under the rug for something with a bigger grille and more ambient lighting? Something tells me the answer won’t fit on a postcard. Regardless, the current Nissan Rogue is looking for another turn in the news cycle, because the 2024 model gets a light facelift and a prescribed injection of available tech. Given how popular these cars are, shall we see what’s new?

My24 Nissan Rogue 0064

Vidframe Min Top
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Up front, the 2024 Nissan Rogue gets a new grille bountiful in horizontal slats. Does it look a bit like orthodontic gear? Sure, but it’s not quite as weird as the lines on the bumper that stretch down from the headlamp cluster bezels and just die when they meet a massive slab of lower valence trim. Yeah, this face will take getting used to.

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Around the back, Nissan’s taken away the hardwearing unpainted plastic that previously stretched up to the load lip, replacing it with sleeker-looking but more scratch-prone painted surfacing that seems to take an unorthodox three-piece design. We’ll have to see the new Rogue in person to discern whether or not the center section of the rear bumper is truly separate, but modular construction could have potential collision repair benefits, an intriguing proposition to those with street parking.

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My24 Nissan Rogue 2 2

Minor styling tweaks aside, the big story is a massive tech upgrade for 2024. The Rogue already had one of the best optional digital clusters in the segment, but the infotainment on pre-facelift models is rather barebones, with the UI sophistication of an off-brand tablet. For most customers used to just plugging their phones in and using Apple CarPlay or Android Auto, it was perfectly fine, but Nissan needed a new infotainment system for the electric age and it just so happens to debut in an entirely gasoline-powered crossover.

My24 Nissan Rogue 2 6

Powered by Google built-in, this largely tile-based infotainment system makes its future ambitions known in a press photo highlighting available apps. You won’t need Plugshare, an app for EV public charging system locating and rating, in a Rogue, but you might want it in an EV. Then again, all these downloadable apps suggest the need for an internet connection, so that raises some question marks.

My24 Nissan Rogue 8578

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In any case, the new Rogue’s Google-based infotainment system still features Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, as opposed to telling customers to take a hike like in certain EVs. That’s quite nice. Also nice? A big 12.3 inch screen so you won’t need fingers like cocktail sticks to poke icons, and a decent set of physical controls. Then again, only SL and Platinum trims get the new infotainment system, while S and SV trims make do with the old system.

My24 Nissan Rogue 2769

Not exactly new but certainly novel, the engine in the Rogue is a liter and a half of mind-boggling complexity. This 201-horsepower 1.5-liter turbocharged three-banger can vary its compression ratio using a multi-link arrangement with an actuator instead of a traditional connecting rod and crankshaft arrangement. Unquestionably the weirdest engine in the compact crossover segment, time will tell whether it’s complex genius or a warranty department’s nightmare. Still, this complexity certainly hasn’t put a damper on sales.

2 Lc1 8361 Edit2 2

In any case, expect the 2024 Nissan Rogue to roll onto dealer lots in 2024, with pricing likely to be announced in the next few months. We’d be surprised if it’s substantially more expensive than the current car. That being said, the current Mitsubishi Outlander is basically a Nissan Rogue with a normal 2.4-liter naturally-aspirated four-cylinder engine and a massive warranty, so if the Rogue strikes your fancy, it might also be worth swinging by your local Mitsubishi dealer. That being said, with 211,091 pre-facelift examples sold in America during the past three quarters, expect to see the new Nissan Rogue everywhere soon. Who knows? It might even be your next rental car.

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(Photo credits: Nissan)

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The Mark
The Mark
9 months ago

Not a Rogue, but I had a Kicks as a rental. I was impressed by the equipment level on such a cheap car…adaptive cruise that took you to a full stop for example. I think that is why Nissan sells these by the boatload. You just get a lot of metal for the money, and they managed to make it look pretty as well.

TXJeepGuy
TXJeepGuy
9 months ago

I had no idea these had a 3 cylinder.

Vetatur Fumare
Vetatur Fumare
9 months ago

Which car has the least appropriate name? The Nissan Rogue is pretty high up there, but I don’t think it beats the Mitsubishi Carisma. Whatever the answer, please don’t let it be a slideshow.

My Goat Ate My Homework
My Goat Ate My Homework
9 months ago
Reply to  Vetatur Fumare

Any 4 door suv that is called a coup. I’ll die on this hill.

Also, I nearly forgot about slideshows. Just had some mild PTSD.

Thomas Metcalf
Thomas Metcalf
9 months ago

After a while I refused to click through any slideshow. I hope the folks here never succumb to the temptation.

IRegertNothing, Esq.
IRegertNothing, Esq.
9 months ago

I am still active on Ye Olde Site, but I if I see anything with the title “Here are the/These are the” whatever I ignore it. I only make an exception for The Onion because humor gets a free pass.

Last edited 9 months ago by IRegertNothing, Esq.
Vetatur Fumare
Vetatur Fumare
9 months ago

I go there, but it feels like wandering through an abandoned mall. I also noticed that they disabled comments on the Root, which made sense as the only people commenting were two or three rather myopic BLM warriors and a half dozen deeply troubled racist trolls. The lighting site probably has another 12 months before comments are turned off…

SNL-LOL Jr
SNL-LOL Jr
9 months ago
Reply to  Vetatur Fumare

Monte Carlo, cared for by absolutely nobody who lives in Monte Carlo.

Last edited 9 months ago by SNL-LOL Jr
Jeff N
Jeff N
9 months ago

Haha. It *was* my last rental car. Well, the 2023 version. It was not half-bad as a rental.

GreatFallsGreen
GreatFallsGreen
9 months ago

My parents have had a 2nd gen Rogue now for 8 years and 60k. While it’s quite dull and even they agree, it hasn’t been a problematic vehicle (knock wood). The CVT is in the back of my mind for sure, but to date the biggest issue so far is ghost readings from the safety monitor systems, because they used the cameras for things like the blind spot monitoring, rather than radar based (which they switched to in later years). Something that can at least be switched off and they aren’t super integral to the car since they’re warnings, not active safety systems. But all in all it hasn’t nickel and dimed the way many other brands have for us over the years.

In the mid-2010s these were a big improvement over the original Rogue and a pretty nice vehicle as far as the segment go. Honda did up their game on the CR-V with the facelift, but the RAV4 still rode like a wooden dolly. And both locked you out of certain features unless you got the top trim or things that they didn’t have at all, while still being a bit cheaper – in the value way like H/K would, not a fire-sale approve-anyone way

Now most have upped their game quite a bit so those advantages aren’t really there, although they do seem to allow more option flexibility at a lower price than Honda (but then who doesn’t). And the new one does seem to be a much improved product, same with Pathfinder. Part of the issue is that the old one lingered too long as-is, so now they’re at least half a generation behind competitors like the RAV4 and CR-V.

The 3-pot has gotten good reviews, but I’m not sure about longevity. A hybrid would make so much sense, even though Nissan didn’t have luck historically with hybrids. And of course their corporate neighbor Mitsubishi has the PHEV available in the Outlander.

Dingus
Dingus
9 months ago

So I used to read The Drive religiously and liked the content quite a lot. That was until they wrote a total handjob of a story about Carlos Ghosn. The “interviewer” just rolled meatballs his at him and it was little more than a way for Ghosn to pretty much just say whatever he wanted (I’m guessing The Drive got paid). I made a comment that the piece was of low journalistic quality, stating that that sort of content was not useful. Comment deleted. I dropped one or two more in, both deleted. I saw a few other people making similar statements, their comments were also gone after an hour.

I’m hoping that The Autopian can do a little better, but let’s see.

These continued pieces on how the new Rogue is Very Good read like advertisements. I think this is the third one in the last few weeks? I’d like to think that the subscriber-based revenue model of this site is successful, but it feels like this content is paid for. These cars were not historically well-made, have had ongoing issues with CVTs, and come from a company that has made predatory lending part of it’s business model. I have a hard time believing that all of a sudden, they swapped the horns and barbed tail for a halo and this is their gift to the world.

I really hope I’m wrong since I do enjoy this site (even as a lowlife non-subscriber), but my spidey senses are tingling…

Last edited 9 months ago by Dingus
My Goat Ate My Homework
My Goat Ate My Homework
9 months ago
Reply to  Dingus

They’re selling over 200,000 a year in the US. That’s about the same as the Tesla Model 3 in the US. So, maybe it is a decent car?

I would consider buying one and I know others who have one now. Also, I enjoy hearing what people in the comments think about normal cars like this so these types of articles are great for just throwing a softball out there for people to talk about.

Last edited 9 months ago by My Goat Ate My Homework
Tinctorium
Tinctorium
9 months ago

I don’t necessarily agree with Yo lo (is that Michael Ditullo?) but the fact that a lot of people living in a car-dependant country buy a cheap large car from a company with predatory lending practices does not really make the case that it is a good car.

Last edited 9 months ago by Tinctorium
Acrimonious Mofo
Acrimonious Mofo
9 months ago
Reply to  Dingus

What in heck are you even talking about? “I think this is the third one in the last few weeks?” I don’t know where you are getting all of your Rogue refresh content, but it’s not here. I mean there’s been some extra Nissan content because David bought a Nissan Leaf. This is a first impression based on a press release, not a review. It’s a very popular mass market vehicle, and it wouldn’t make a lot of sense to ignore it. Is the piece a little fluffy? Perhaps, but again it’s an impression based on a press release: “They changed the thing. The thing looks okay. The best thing about the old thing was the tech. New tech seems fine…”. Not everything is a conspiracy: the Earth is round, the moon landings were real, steel doesn’t have to melt completely to become structurally unsound, and there was a gunman on the grassy knoll.

GreatFallsGreen
GreatFallsGreen
9 months ago

Right, it reads like every “regular car has received an update” piece on here – or really, any preview/announcement piece from an auto media outlet. It’s not a review, even if you can go down to Enterprise today and probably get the same impression for most things except the tech. The biggest slant on the previews seems to be on the positive side for cars that are well-liked already.

Autopian’s SEO seems to be good (just based on my own searches for past articles), but I don’t think quite on the level that Nissan is paying them under the table for some nice words to influence buyers of an already popular vehicle.

Njd
Njd
9 months ago
Reply to  Dingus

This site has one of the clearest disclosure and ethics policies on the internet and you’re worried that a short article about a refresh of a popular model is a paid ad? Come on.

IRegertNothing, Esq.
IRegertNothing, Esq.
9 months ago
Reply to  Njd

I don’t know what they are worried about either. It makes sense to talk about updates to a popular if decidedly non-enthusiast vehicle, and we have more than enough commenters who will gladly shit all over the Rogue. I know I did.

IRegertNothing, Esq.
IRegertNothing, Esq.
9 months ago

I’m not trusting any kind of novel engine technology from a company that can’t even make a goddamn CVT that will outlive a set of tires. Seriously Nissan, get your shit together. You’re doing to CVTs what GM did to diesel engines in the 80’s.

Crimedog
Crimedog
9 months ago

Their variable compression motor isn’t new. It has been around a few years, and the technology has definitely been through a warranty cycle.
I think it is pretty cool, honestly.

Amberturnsignalsarebetter
Amberturnsignalsarebetter
9 months ago
Reply to  Crimedog

Genuine question from an ignorant idiot: what are we gaining from all these clever innovations in ICE tech? How much better are they compared to a simple, basic 4-cylinder from 20+ years ago?

I don’t see any mind-boggling advances in fuel efficiency, performance, etc. so I find myself wondering if a solid, reliable and somewhat SIMPLE gas engine would be a better option for the average car (in terms of maintenance, parts complexity, etc.) – surely we could take what we learned in the Geo Metro and apply it to a Nissan Rouge or any one of it’s generic mid-size SUV equivalents?

I am braced for a flood of responses pointing out how stupid I am, and accept that you are probably right, but I just wonder why we’re not seeing 50mpg from every new car on the market.

Vee
Vee
9 months ago

The most obvious one is there’s no torque lag, which means if they shove a CVT into it that the car can stay near maximum torque output at all times. Most of these small displacement engines have an almost flat torque curve that’s akin to the Ford 300 I6. They do that because that means, in theory, people are less likely to slam on the throttle (yeah right) and thus get better fuel mileage. An engine running at stable RPMs is more efficient after all.

Amberturnsignalsarebetter
Amberturnsignalsarebetter
9 months ago
Reply to  Vee

This makes sense, appreciate the reply!

Crimedog
Crimedog
9 months ago

Sorry for the delay; this is the first time that I have had someone reply on this site. 🙂
From 20 years ago, we had (in Nissan World), the QR25DE, which was around 200/200 hp/tq (VERY roughly) and 22 mpgish. What was Honda? KA20? lower torque, higher redline, 25-30mpg? But, the cars were much lighter.

So, now, the 1.5liter VCR motor gets 200hp. I mean, there is a mess of regulations, like engine size in Europe, useability, and… man, I don’t know what else.
But, yes, there is an asymptote on efficiency. The closer we get to it, the wonkier the solutions will look and the more they will cost.

It is also the reason automakers share motors or, at the least, motors across model lines.

To vehemently agree with you, I would love for, say, BMW’s 2.5 turbo-4 to be used by all the cars. I could be swayed to a hybrid something, too.

Sorry for the all-over-the-place response; it has been a long week.

Amberturnsignalsarebetter
Amberturnsignalsarebetter
9 months ago
Reply to  Crimedog

No worries – I know how crazy it gets! It does feel like we’re heading towards a place where maybe 3 different engines could serve 90% of the market – maybe as EVs become more prevalent we’ll see even more of a shift to consolidate development costs across ICE automakers.

Last edited 9 months ago by Amberturnsignalsarebetter
Ncbrit
Ncbrit
9 months ago

I had one as a rental about 5 years ago. Terrible car. Harsh, noisy, underpowered, whiny transmission, and the power window switches were hidden behind the door handle so you couldn’t reach them. I saw it as a rental fleet and low credit score appliance car and nothing more. This new one looks better but I still expect it to be the compact SUV equivalent of an Altima.

Boxing Pistons
Boxing Pistons
9 months ago
Reply to  Ncbrit

I drove my sister’s from CO to MO several years back and had a similar experience. They are undoubtedly a good value, but that thing was a penalty box for anyone who remotely enjoys driving. The harsh engine, the droning CVT, and the cheap interior really turned me off. After that, my blanket assumption of anyone I saw driving one was that they just don’t give a hoot about driving. It’s cheap, point A to B with some extras thrown in. It’s like the McDonalds value meal of cars.

KevFC
KevFC
9 months ago

The author notes the scarcity of rogues in his area. Most likely this has to do with the genetic composition of the population. Rogues are most popular among descendants of pirates. This would make a good Phd topic for someone in the burgeoning field of auto-genetics.

Last edited 9 months ago by KevFC
Eric Davis
Eric Davis
9 months ago
Reply to  KevFC

You can’t spell Rogue without Arrrr

Greg
Greg
9 months ago

These cars are nicer than most people think, a friends wife has one and they really enjoy it, no complaints.

I have the google OS in my GMC and once you turn off the google assistant, and popups, it runs quickly and smoothly. I just hate how intrusive it is at first and it was off putting until I researched via youtube on how to fix it. The dealer certainly couldn’t help.

“why wouldn’t you want that?”

TDI in PNW
TDI in PNW
9 months ago

I borrowed my mother’s ’21 Rogue Platinum and I thought it was pretty great, it’s now on my shortlist for buying next year. I hadn’t thought much of Nissans in years so I was surprised how much I liked it after cross shopping the competition. …and it plays FLAC files too?

Captain Muppet
Captain Muppet
9 months ago

“This 201-horsepower 1.5-liter turbocharged three-banger can vary its compression ratio using a multi-link arrangement with an actuator instead of a traditional connecting rod and crankshaft arrangement.”

It still has con rods and a crank, but the big end of the conrod has been replaced with a doodad that supports the con rod going up on one side and a link going down on the other side. That new link is supported by thingy at the bottom that can rotate to move the link up (which lowers the compression ratio for when you need a load of boost) or down (which increases the compression ratio for when you need efficiency).

None of the new bits look particularly fragile, the pin joints are just like piston pins and should be as reliable (more so as they are cooler). There is an actuator that might fail, but the engine will still run if it does, and it’s not like there aren’t already loads of cars with wacky actuators waiting to smash your valves to bits and no one worries much about those.

It looks like solid engineering, and the sort of thing people have been playing around with for decades waiting for efficiency/emissions to become important enough to offset the cost/weight.

There are other benefits in there, like reduced side force on the pistons during the power stroke and an opportunity to play with engine balance.

As with all engine things I can’t help wondering if Honda or Yamaha might have done it better, but it’s not a feature that would put me off buying the car. It’s everything outside of the engine that puts me off.

Were the ICE ban not coming we’d see more of this sort of thing in the alternative-fuels future we’ve been denied.

Nsane In The MembraNe
Nsane In The MembraNe
9 months ago
Reply to  Captain Muppet

The VC turbo technology is legitimately cool. It’s a damn shame that it’s:

1). Paired with Jatco CVTs

2). So late to the game

It would have been interesting to see what could’ve been done with it if it was introduced 5 years ago. Unfortunately due to ICE bans it’s likely only going to see applications in Nissan commodity cars, which is a damn shame. My turbo 4 gets V8 fuel economy and in my experience very few turbo 4s actually get good fuel economy unless you’re on the highway…so the idea of adding some efficiency back into the equation is neat to me.

Glutton for Piëch
Glutton for Piëch
9 months ago

it’s been out for a few years, but it is a fair point. and it is a cool tech, but I would never trust it on a Nissan, no matter how well built it might be.

I4 turbos aren’t usually very efficient in the real world. They do phenomenally well under testing conditions and that’s why they’re absolutely everywhere. I’m also curious if the DCT or extra weight of the Kona contributes to your fuel economy. My brother has a VN 6 speed, and he drives like a total jackass. I think he still averages high 20s city and low/mid 30s highway if he REALLY tries (he doesn’t).

Funny thing is, most efficient car we’ve ever owned is a flat 6 Porsche. Drove a few hundred not-conservative miles last week and averaged low 30s. This is with city/hwy mix and many redline pulls to pass turtle-racing semis. The next closest are tied for my M156 E63 and Stinger that could touch the high 20s. I’ve never had a turbo 4 anything, but plenty of friends and family have and the Porsche definitely bests them all. Big NA engines spinning at low revs will almost always be more efficient than a small engine with a fat turbo furiously trying to keep up (and depending on gearing, is usually at least slightly in boost, and definitely not in vacuum under a lot of driving conditions). It’s phenomenally stupid that everyrhing has gone turbo and mostly I3/I4. The do better in a lab and that’s usually it. brb gonna go buy a dieselgate JSW

R Rr
R Rr
9 months ago

Big NA engines spinning at low revs will almost always be more efficient than a small engine with a fat turbo furiously trying to keep up (and depending on gearing, is usually at least slightly in boost, and definitely not in vacuum under a lot of driving conditions).

In my experience that “small engine with a fat turbo furiously trying to keep up” is fantasy. My fairly modified Mk7 GTI that runs almost 30psi of boost on the track is almost never in boost when driving it on the street to & from the track. I know this because of the bright red display of my electronic boost gauge I have in my dash.

Coincidentally, I get over 25mpg in city driving (while I get half that on the track, but that shouldn’t surprise anyone), and that is again, with some spicy mods & tuning and not driving like a grandma.

Modern cars don’t have ‘fat’ turbos anymore, they’re more like ‘small & angry’, and modern ECUs with stratified injection, variable valve timing and variable intake length can lead to very efficient engines.

OTOH my diesel Sportwagen gets almost 50mpg and that’s a whole different level of efficiency.

Last edited 9 months ago by R Rr
Glutton for Piëch
Glutton for Piëch
9 months ago
Reply to  R Rr

I did qualify it with “almost always” and in your case, I 100% agree. Most of my family have hot hatches, and they’re hideously efficient compared to most of what I own. However, most people in the US don’t drive hot hatches. That same engine having to lug around an Atlas is nowhere near as economical, and has to sit higher in the rev range to carry a car essentially twice its size up to the same speed. That’s really what I was getting at. I’ll also say, which generally supports my statement on these engines being built for lab tests, as long as you don’t go absolutely crazy, modified (bolt ons and tuned/piggybacked) turbo engines usually end up getting better fuel economy than a stock version. My friend’s MK7 gets much better (like 4-5mpg avg) mileage after modding because of all the restrictions and whatnot removed. His is full bolt-on, tuned, JB4, whole nine. That’s not really the point though. The Golf has always been designed with I4s in mind. Big, two+ ton crossovers were not. That’s where I’m saying turbo 4s are less economical than their old v6/v8 counterparts.

Of course all the modern doo-dads help that, but back to the Porsche.. the Cayman 3.4 S (which has DFI, VVT and variable length intakes) got 25 combined EPA est., the 718 2.5T S gets 22 combined. But it emits fewer particles in a lab, so that’s apparently better than burning less fuel.

Last edited 9 months ago by Glutton for Piëch
Chachi549
Chachi549
9 months ago
Reply to  Captain Muppet

THIS is why I come to the comments on this site. I was like that engine sounds cool, but what does all that mean? Then you come and explain it so clearly. bravo!

Captain Muppet
Captain Muppet
9 months ago
Reply to  Chachi549

Thanks!

JDE
JDE
9 months ago
Reply to  Captain Muppet

errrr, no MDS, AFM/DFM and Cam Phasers all massive worries for other brands too.

Captain Muppet
Captain Muppet
9 months ago
Reply to  JDE

My point was the actuator is no more of a worry than any other actuator, and most people don’t worry about them.

I’ve had a 16 year old BMW with VANOS and Valvetronic and apart from a couple of minutes panic every time a coil pack failed I didn’t worry about actuators at all.

JDE
JDE
9 months ago
Reply to  Captain Muppet

the problem is, most of the rest of us do worry about Vanos and SMG’s, also Turbos on Bavarian crap. So the bonus is you who do enjoy dealing with it get them much cheaper after 7 years or just past drivetrain warranty.

D-dub
D-dub
9 months ago

expect the 2024 Nissan Rogue to roll onto dealer lots in 2024, with pricing likely to be announced in the next few months.

So they’re not selling their 2024 model until after 2024 has already begun? I thought manufacturers always released the next year’s models before the calendar year arrived.

Captain Muppet
Captain Muppet
9 months ago
Reply to  D-dub

They do that so people can feel like they are buying a slice of the future. It’s terrible confusing meaningless marketing!

I think Nissan’s customers just want a car like their last one but with a warranty. Having this years model with this years number on it is one thing less to worry about.

I’d buy another 350Z if they still made it (they do!, but now it’s 50 Zs better!) and if they sold it in Europe (oh).

Parsko
Parsko
9 months ago

I read your intro and had to stop. I’m sure the rest is great, but you stopped me at “Is it because I don’t see many in my local area”.

I hate this vehicle with a passion. Every time I look, I see one. Everyday on my commute, I am behind one at some point. I have hit two of these in the same spot, in the same circumstance, in different locations, in one year.

If there is nothing good to say about something, then don’t say anything at all. Sorry, that rule does not apply to this gigantic turd. There is nothing positive to say about this appliance on wheels, because that is all it is.

Last edited 9 months ago by Parsko
Ranwhenparked
Ranwhenparked
9 months ago

Why would people ever stop buying Nissan Rogues? It lets you keep the party going with a slightly larger standard touch screen than Honda CR-V!

AssMatt
AssMatt
9 months ago

Wow, they still make these. I remember in season one of Heroes how excited the cheerleader was to drive the Rogue. Come to think of it, Hiro was pretty fired up about the Versa, too. Nice try, Nissan Product Placement Division!

Also what does it say about a car that I’d rather hear more about the quesadilla?

Last edited 9 months ago by AssMatt
Jack Trade
Jack Trade
9 months ago
Reply to  AssMatt

I remember the Hawaii 5-0 reboot was all GM product placement. Sure, McGarrett and Danno drove the expected Camaro, but some of the other choices were stretching it to say the least – b/c what says I’m a Hawaiian special unit cop more than Kono’s Cruze sedan?!

Best part was the pilot was filmed before said placement, so a more random collection of vehicles that suddenly became all GM by the third episode. Including minimization of the vintage Mercury (ala the original show) that was McGarrett’s father’s.

Tim Cougar
Tim Cougar
9 months ago
Reply to  Jack Trade

In the pilot the main car was a new 2011 Mustang GT with the return of the 5.0 V8. 5.0, Hawaii 5-0… the serendipity was too perfect.

https://www.imcdb.org/vehicle_335958-Ford-Mustang-S197-2011.html

Jack Trade
Jack Trade
9 months ago
Reply to  Tim Cougar

Oh good call…I’d totally forgotten that’s when the 5.0 debuted. I like how the reboots of various shows always have more of an automotive presence than new shows, betraying their genesis. MacGyver still drives a Wrangler in the reboot.

Greg
Greg
9 months ago
Reply to  AssMatt

my wife had an OG when we were in the dating stages. This newer one in the last few years is an entirely different level. In a good way though!

Gary Lynch
Gary Lynch
9 months ago

I don’t get the Rogue hate. It’s a smallish compact wagon. A great reliable automotive appliance for those that need such. Were even better a few years ago when they sold new for 33% off list.

Maybe it’s telling when it seems the most “important “ aspect is the tech. Really? If that’s what is important to you, then you deserved boring handling and a CVT.

Pappa P
Pappa P
9 months ago
Reply to  Gary Lynch

I have a buddy at work who just bought a 5 year old Rogue with low mileage.
CVT packed up shortly after buying and the repair bill is $7500, after which the CVT will eventually fail again.
It sickens me to think of the college kids and young families that will be grifted by dealers into buying these things off lease, only to find out that they have made a very costly mistake.
It’s a nasty little car.

Paint-Drinking Thundercock Harvey Park
Paint-Drinking Thundercock Harvey Park
9 months ago
Reply to  Gary Lynch

Have you driven, or been driven in, a Rogue? Even brand new ones are heinous. Slow and loud. If you’re cross shopping a rav4 and crv, there’s no reason to buy a Rogue unless Nissan gives you great financing or if you like the styling a lot.

Gary Lynch
Gary Lynch
8 months ago

I owned a 2019 Rogue. For my mission at the time, it fit it well. Its not a sports car. Neither is the Rav4. I didn’t need a sports car. New price was thousands less than Honda or Toyota.

sold it in 2022 to Carmax. Sold it for $4000 more than I paid for it. Mission accomplished.

Goof
Goof
9 months ago
Reply to  Gary Lynch

The JATCO CVTs are something a lot of mechanics have real disdain for. Their failure rate can be reduced with more frequent fluid replacements (30K interval), but if you think the average new car buyer ever considers replacing any transmission fluid, I have a bridge to sell you.

Nsane In The MembraNe
Nsane In The MembraNe
9 months ago
Reply to  Goof

I have two coworkers with Rogues. Both of them needed full transmission replacements in the first 50,000 miles.

Goof
Goof
9 months ago

Hey, I said reduce, not eliminates!

Failures in the first 50K is no surprise to me. They’re known garbage.

JDE
JDE
9 months ago
Reply to  Goof

80K is very much long lived in anything Nissan with a CVT.

Goof
Goof
9 months ago
Reply to  JDE

Knowing many mechanics, I’m well aware! What absolutely killed me recently is one of my previous upstairs neighbors replaced her gently used Impala (after it was hit and totaled out) with a BRAND NEW last gen Nissan Rogue about 3 years ago.

Teacher and maaaaybe 30, so not the best financial decision. Think her mom co-signed the note. What really got me is her boyfriend – a Nissan dealership mechanic – didn’t talk her out of it.

Nsane In The MembraNe
Nsane In The MembraNe
9 months ago
Reply to  Goof

I think people wind up in Nissans because they can’t get financed anywhere else and they’re comparatively cheap. Their cars are objectively worse than the Honda and Toyota competitors and maybe I’m biased since I own an N but I’d take a Hyundai/Kia over one as well, mainly because they’re cheaper and don’t have time bomb CVTs across the board.

I’d also struggle with their reputation. For better or worse (I’m not saying this is a good or bad thing, just a thing) most people see a Nissan and the things that come to mind are Big Altima Energy and Low credit? No credit? No problem! Every highway in my area is littered with the damn things in various states of disrepair doing 90 at all times.

I personally wouldn’t want to be associated with that…and we’re casually keeping an eye on cars because my wife (who is decidedly not an enthusiast) will likely want a new one in the next year or two and even she has said she wouldn’t ever consider a Nissan for these reasons. If you live and drive in the DC area you have absolutely been tormented by a kamikaze Nissan before.

Hell…if your commute involves less wholesome parts of town like my wife and mine do you probably watch your life flash before your eyes because of some shit a Rogue or Altima pulled every week. I know I do…and for better or worse I’ll never be able to overlook that.

Last edited 9 months ago by Nsane In The MembraNe
JDE
JDE
9 months ago

Sad part is the Datsun/Nissan image was pretty good for a long time, a Nissan Sentra(tsuro) basically replaced the VW beetle in Mexico in the 90’s. that is saying something if they are robust enough and cheap enough to fix to become a staple like that down there. I would still consider a Nissan Frontier of a few years back, the V6 versions are old tech, but genuinely decent little trucks it seems. Hell I still kind of want a G35 coupe. That first gen tarted up 350Z was genuinely attractive. Goshn really tainted the name though with cheap cost cutting measures to increase volume on lesser vehicles, and it shows in the reputation Nissan now has to fight against..

05Mil Machine
05Mil Machine
9 months ago
Reply to  JDE

I agree about the Frontier being a bright spot for Nissan. Maybe this is just me getting older, but the more I see the “new tech” from manufacturers, the more I appreciate the old things. I am more interested now in a proven, reliable, maintainable drivetrain than I am in being a beta tester for whatever is the newest thing.

Nsane In The MembraNe
Nsane In The MembraNe
9 months ago

The Talltima! The low credit/no credit special for folks who think they need an SUV. Can’t wait to see these rolling though my neighborhood at 2am doing 35 over. Although our petition for speed bumps has been granted so I’m going to watch a couple of these absolutely wreck their suspensions live.

Jack Trade
Jack Trade
9 months ago

You win today for “Talltima”! Nissan’s bipolar mojo has always been fascinating to me…those vehicles are from the same company that brings us the Z cars and the (older) Maximas.

I can’t tell from the pics if the wheels are cool or annoying. Top shot yikes, final shot hmmm.

George CoStanza
George CoStanza
9 months ago

This ^^^^
Review was informative I look forward to being cut off by the new 2024 Rogue, aptly named to describe the debonair rapscallion driver’s regard for traffic laws.
That VC engine sounds like the Jared Leto of power trains. Bonkers choices that detract from what little reliability the vehicle had to start, for an audience that does not care.

Drive By Commenter
Drive By Commenter
9 months ago

Does it have Big Altima Energy?

Cool Dave
Cool Dave
9 months ago

You’re telling me they sell a lot of these more affordable, relatively well equipped, somewhat reliable with zero maintenance, credit-doesn’t-matter crossovers? Shocking I say!

Pappa P
Pappa P
9 months ago
Reply to  Cool Dave

They’re not reliable.

Spikedlemon
Spikedlemon
9 months ago
Reply to  Pappa P

They make it through the first few years of ownership.

Pappa P
Pappa P
9 months ago
Reply to  Spikedlemon

Very true. They make it through the lease no problem. Then the bad news comes…

JDE
JDE
9 months ago
Reply to  Cool Dave

it will be an interesting bet as which will grenade first? VC turbo on a cheap car or the already well known Nissan Brand CVT.

Andy Individual
Andy Individual
9 months ago

Seems like the kind of vehicle you end up taking somewhere you don’t really want to go, but have to.

OSpazX
OSpazX
9 months ago

When showing an updated vehicle, could you please put pictures of the pre-updated one for comparison?

Preferably put the old v new photos side by side, with the same (or as close as possible) camera angles.

Pleeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeease

Last edited 9 months ago by OSpazX
Nlpnt
Nlpnt
9 months ago

Take a good long look, folks, this is the last time you’ll see one in this top trim level. People buy the Talltima like crazy not because it’s good – there are better, cheaper cars – but because it’s a lot of metal for the money.

Alexander Moore
Alexander Moore
9 months ago

I think it’s an improvement. This horizontal chrome grille texture feels very classic and classy in my book, much better than that huge chrome bucktooth ‘V-Motion’ that was there before.

https://www.drivesection.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/02/2023-Nissan-X-Trail-ST-L-2WD-Front-3.jpg

Crazy they’re putting the VC turbo in a more mainstream application. I guess the four-cylinder version must have done well in the higher grade Altimas and QX50?

Last edited 9 months ago by Alexander Moore
JDE
JDE
9 months ago

Mitsubishi for the win because of the motor solely….now can we get one with an actual Auto Trans or maybe even better a good Manual trans.

Joe Pucciarelli
Joe Pucciarelli
9 months ago
Reply to  JDE

Spot on, JDE! For my money, this is a vehicle you lease, not own, given the amount of vehicle being hauled around by a 3-cylinder turbo.

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