Home » The Chrysler Halcyon Concept Makes Chrysler Look Even More Lost

The Chrysler Halcyon Concept Makes Chrysler Look Even More Lost

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Chrysler just revealed its new Halcyon Concept car, and it’s cool; it looks great, it’s filled with lots of fun gizmos, and hot damn those are some wicked doors. Now that I’ve established that I’m not a hater, I’ll tell you what I really think: For a brand with only a single model and zero fully electric offerings to be showing such a pie-in-the-sky concept vehicle with wacky features like a retractable steering wheel and an “unlimited range” powertrain — it just feels weird. It’s 2024 — Tesla’s got Falcon doors, a solid semi-autonomous drive-system, and an origami truck in production; Audi and Porsche have slick sports sedans; VW resurrected the iconic Bus as an EV; and I can go on. EVs are not futuristic, they’re here now, so to see that the much-anticipated new Chrysler EV concept is so far from an actual production vehicle — it makes it seem like Chrysler is still trying to find itself. And maybe that’s just it — it’s a brand trying to figure out where to go, and the Chrysler Halcyon Concept is one stab at the right path. Let’s have a look.

“Ready to witness Chrysler revolutionize the future of mobility? Stay tuned for the reveal next week” Chrysler wrote on Instagram last week when it showed its teaser for the Halcyon. This had a number of news outlets wondering if we were finally going to get a glimpse of Chrysler’s first electric car, set to debut in 2025, now that the somewhat production feasible-looking Airflow Concept that we saw before was chosen to “evolve” instead of hit dealer lots.

Vidframe Min Top
Vidframe Min Bottom

Here’s what we wrote when we first saw Chrysler’s teaser of the Halcyon concept car:

Given the 18-month timeline between Dodge unveiling the Charger Daytona SRT concept and the impending debut of the production version, it would track that Chrysler is about to unveil a concept for a production car that should come to life later in 2025 for the 2026 model year.

Heres’ Carscoops on the teaser:

Designed to provide a glimpse into the brand’s all-electric future, the model is a “forward-looking” concept that likely foreshadows their first electric vehicle that is due in 2025.

Here’s Autoweek:

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In any case, it should be good news for Chrysler dealers if this concept heads for production, as their lots have been minivan-only spaces after the departure of the Chrysler 300 last year.

[…]

What we do know is that Stellantis has three EV platforms that could help this machine get to the assembly line sooner rather than later.

And here’s Autoevolution actually hypothesizing that the new concept car will actually be production-ready:

The first Chrysler EV will be unveiled in production form tomorrow and will go into production in 2025 to mark the automaker’s 100-year anniversary. It would be the first step toward a fully electric portfolio, even though it seems that Chrysler has fallen behind schedule.

It’s clear that many folks were expecting or at least hoping for something nearly ready to hit the assembly line. Just look at the third comment down on Chrysler’s teaser from last week:

Screen Shot 2024 02 12 At 9.07.27 Pm

Here’s another commenter excited to see the brand coming back:

Screen Shot 2024 02 12 At 9.08.00 Pm

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But the Halcyon, built on Stellantis’ STLA Large platform (which offers battery sizes between 85 kwH and 118 kWh), is indeed “another concept” and it isn’t “more Chrysler cars” because it’s not going into production — certainly not in this form.

Let’s Look At The Styling

Screen Shot 2024 02 12 At 9.42.36 Pm

“Chrysler Halcyon Concept Pushes Innovative Boundaries, Offers Forward-looking Vision of Brand’s All-electric Future” is the title of Chrysler’s press release, which describes the machine’s styling and features. Let’s briefly start with the styling before I get into the bizarre features that are almost certainly never actually going to make it into production.

The Chrysler Halcyon Concept Exemplifies A Fully Electrified Fut

Like a number of Chrysler concept cars before (especially the Chrysler ME412, which sadly never made it to production), the Halcyon concept looks damn good. It’s got a wedge-shaped nose, a single horizontal front light, and gorgeous curves over the front wheels. It has a strong character line along the doors on each side, and overall it has a really sweet “fastback”-esque profile.

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Chrysler Halcyon Concept
Chrysler Halcyon Concept

The fenders have a big vent-like feature just aft of the front wheels — features that “exhaust” along the side of the car. The hood also has a big aperture right at the base of the windshield; this is, I think, what Chrysler refers to as the “air blade,” saying in its press release:

A subtle-yet-functional front air blade aerodynamic pass-through area enhances performance and all-important BEV range capability. The pass-through is visible from the cockpit, providing the driver a real-world connection with the concept’s performance and functionality.

A Warm Acrylic Tinted Butterfly Hinged Canopy Serves As A Third

Chrysler Halcyon Concept

The car not only has wide-opening front doors and suicide rear doors, it also has gullwing-style roof-windows. “A warm Acrylic-tinted butterfly-hinged canopy serves as a third door for the Chrysler Halcyon Concept and works in conjunction with the red–carpet style side doors to offer spacious ingress and egress,” Chrysler writes in its press release.

The Rear Of The Chrysler Halcyon Concept Also Carries Its Own Un

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The back end has a nice “widebody” look, with a simple single horizontal rear light that doesn’t really have a whole lot going on underneath it. It’s a clean rear end.

“The rear of the Chrysler Halcyon concept also carries its own unique silhouette, with a water line that emphasizes the width and shoulders of the car, and the front’s cross-car read and LED-lit Chrysler Wing logo are mirrored in the rear,” writes Chrysler.

The brand also talks about some aero features back there, writing: “The concept’s Active Aero Technology incorporates a sliding rear lower aero diffuser created from lightweight composite material, a rear spoiler and air suspension to enhance efficiency and driving dynamics.”

The Interior

The Interior Of The Chrysler Halcyon Concept Is An Immersive Env

The inside features lots of glass. There’s a windshield that wraps quite far towards the rear of the car, there are of course the side windows, there are the upper gullwing framed windows, and there’s even a skinny little sunroof along the center of the roof running fore-aft.

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“The interior of the Chrysler Halcyon Concept is an immersive environment with an almost 360-degree range of view, possessing a duality that delivers a ‘digital detox’ cockpit through stress-free autonomous features,” Chrysler says.

The brand continues, talking about sustainable interior materials and “harmony”: “The interior is intimate, natural yet futuristic, and utilizes 95 percent sustainable materials throughout to achieve not just ‘Harmony in Motion; but harmony with the planet.”

Right.

The Lightweight, Keystone Shaped Front Seats Are Luxurious And S

The Stowable 15.6 Inch Console Screen Of The Chrysler Halcyon Co

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Chrysler Halcyon Concept Interior With 15.6 Inch Console Screen
Chrysler Halcyon Concept interior with 15.6-inch console screen stowed away.

It’s hard to tell in some of the photos, but there’s a large display ahead of the steering wheel that stretches from the base of one A-pillar all the way across the car to the base of the other. Plus there’s a 15.6-inch screen in the center of the dash that can be rotated to be horizontal or vertical, and it can stow away as shown in the image directly above. The screen appears to act as the shifter, as the photos above show PRNDL along the left side.

There’s also apparently a giant footrest, with Chrysler writing: “The Chrysler Halcyon Concept eliminates the traditional instrument panel, allowing occupants to take advantage of a footrest that runs the width of the car to better relax and enjoy the view from the panoramic windshield.”

The Concept Car-y Wacky Stuff

Chrysler Halcyon Concept Interior Sketch.

Okay, now let’s get into the concept car-y stuff. That steering wheel? Chrysler says it folds out of the way, allowing the car to drive autonomously:

The reverse-yoke designed steering wheel folds away, with pedals also retracting when the steering wheel retracts to provide a Zen-like environment

[…]

STLA AutoDrive technology platform enables Level 4 autonomous driving features that eliminates the stress of traffic using predictive navigation. The steering wheel and pedals retract, and the dimmable glass canopy and windshield can turn opaque for privacy and to create an immersive space, such as a Stargazing Mode in which seats morph into a laid-back position while the augmented-reality windshield HUD projects information on stars and constellations.

The quote above mentions Stargazing mode. Apparently that uses the windshield head-up display to augment reality and provide astrological information as you look into the night sky:

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Screen Shot 2024 02 12 At 10.29.11 Pm

This is all some wacky stuff, but wait, there’s more. The car can apparently scan an approaching driver’s face.

Screen Shot 2024 02 12 At 10.30.43 Pm

Here’s what Chrysler says about how “Facial Biometrics” works:

As the driver approaches the Chrysler Halcyon Concept, the vehicle recognizes the driver, comes to life, and provides a greeting through a Welcome Mode that uses biometric identification. Illuminated LED exterior lighting animation, personalized exterior sound features and a greeting on interior screens CHRYSLER HALCYON CONC EPT | 7 provide a warm welcome and sense of connection with the vehicle.

But it gets so much weirder:

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Screen Shot 2024 02 12 At 10.30.53 Pm

Chrysler literally touts the Halcyon Concept as a vehicle that offers “unlimited range.” Yes, you read that right — unlimited. Here’s how Chrysler describes it on its website:

The Chrysler Halcyon Concept imagines a future that takes advantage of innovative Dynamic Wireless Power Transfer (DWPT) technology to wirelessly recharge electric vehicles (EVs) traveling over specially equipped, dedicated road lanes, allowing for unlimited range and travel from destinations such as New York to Seattle without need of charger, charge cord or charge stations. Stellantis partnered in 2022 to demonstrate the potential of DWPT technology at the “Arena del Futuro” circuit in Chiari, Italy

So those were the car’s strangest features, but there are so many other odd ones, like “Personalized Vehicle Cymatics,” which Chrysler says involves “sound and vibrations mirrored through visuals – helping to create the mood of the vehicle.” The brand goes on, writing in its release: “Different sound frequencies prompt corresponding product shapes on the console screen — calming frequencies align with a more dispersed particle pattern on the console screen, while more spirited sound frequencies generated during drive modes create energetic particle patterns that provide the driver with a real-world connection to the vehicle’s performance status. Ambient interior lighting and sounds also adjust to driver inputs and complement the cabin environment.”

Screen Shot 2024 02 12 At 11.01.51 Pm

Then there are the “Stow ‘N Go” seats that slide back into the cargo area:

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Screen Shot 2024 02 12 At 11.47.48 Pm

There’s also the built-in virtual assistant:

Stellantis AI virtual assistant preps for the day, notifying the driver and the Chrysler Halcyon Concept of upcoming events

And there’s even a “breakthrough” battery apparently:

The concept also envisions incorporating breakthrough Lyten 800V lithium-sulfur EV batteries that do not use nickel, cobalt, or manganese, resulting in an estimated 60 percent lower carbon footprint than today’s best-in-class batteries and a pathway to achieve the lowest emissions EV battery on the global market. In May 2023, Stellantis Ventures, the corporate venture fund of Stellantis, announced an investment in Lyten to accelerate the commercialization of Lyten 3D Graphene applications for the mobility industry.

Chrysler Seems A Bit Lost

Screen Shot 2024 02 13 At 12.07.26 Am

Suffice it to say: This car is very much a concept, with many features so strange that it’s clear they’ll never actually make it to production. I find that disappointing, though to be fair, when Chrysler first showed a teaser for the Halcyon concept, it described the vehicle as “a new, innovative concept car” whose teaser images “provide an advance look at one potential path of the brand’s all-electric future.”

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So, at least in that press release, Chrysler wasn’t saying “this car is the future of our brand,” it was just saying “we might go in this direction.” It’s a potential path.

In the new press release, Chrysler states: “The Chrysler Halcyon Concept, designed on the STLA Large platform, offers an aerodynamic, streamlined, and uncompromising vision of the Chrysler brand’s future exterior character.” So basically, this is really a design concept meant to “showcase yet another design direction that the brand will take,” as Mopar Insiders put it. And look, as a design concept, I think Chrysler nailed it; the thing is cool.

But the deadline for Chrysler to actually build a car is ridiculously tight, with the brand stating in its press release:

Chrysler will launch the brand’s first battery-electric vehicle in 2025 and will feature an all-electric portfolio in 2028. The Chrysler Halcyon Concept reinforces the brand’s commitment to the Stellantis Dare Forward 2030 plan, which cultivates the electrified and more efficient propulsion systems that will enable Stellantis to cut its global carbon footprint by 50 percent by 2030 and to lead the transportation industry by achieving net carbon zero by 2038.

So Chrysler is slated to have its first fully-electric vehicle by 2025; that’s next year. And instead of showing us a production-feasible car, we get a car with a steering wheel and pedals that hide away, with “unlimited range” thanks to a silly under-floor wireless charging feature compatible with basically no roads, with a face-sensing camera, with a windshield that will show you constellations thanks to “Star Gaze” mode, with “Personal Vehicle Symatics” to give you the vibrations/visual depictions of those vibrations you need to get the right vibe in your cabin, and with a bunch of other wacky stuff.

The Chrysler Halcyon feels very much like an early concept, not one that has to inspire a bunch of EVs slated to start coming out next year.

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Chrysler says in this press release where the Halcyon fits into Chrysler’s plans, writing: “The Chrysler Halcyon Concept is the latest in a steady progression of futuristic concepts representing the brand’s electrification transformation. Previously, the brand revealed the Chrysler Portal Concept in 2017, the Chrysler Airflow Concept in 2022 and the Chrysler Synthesis Cockpit Demonstrator in 2023.”

It seems like Chrysler is trying to figure out which design direction to take. Is Chrysler a bit lost?

Maybe so, but maybe, when it comes to rebuild a brand, rushing to get a vehicle into production isn’t the move. Build some concepts, figure out what the world wants, and then execute. Maybe a “steady” progression is the right one, but that doesn’t mean I can’t be a bit bummed that this Halcyon concept is so absurdly concept-y.

All Images: Chrysler

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86-GL
86-GL
2 months ago

So what could this possibly be? The new 300? Something fancier?

Maybe Chrysler feels the electric crossover market is over saturated- (It is) and a proper, brand-defining halo car is the move- Something aspirational, with high margins to help float future models. It’s a logical and well-trodden path, but I cant help thinking the time for that was pre-pandemic. They’ve only had 13 years since the LD 300 went on sale to start thinking about a replacement… What have they been DOING since then?

I would be screaming right now if I was a Chrysler dealer. The Airflow was boring, but it would have been something to sell. They’re setting themselves up for another Grand Wagoneer situation.

Styling wise, this Halcyon is tasteful but completely characterless as a Chrysler. It’s like a demo model from a 3D software company, or an unlicensed fantasy vehicle from a video game. What an empty and concerning announcement.

sentinelTk
sentinelTk
2 months ago

Can’t wait until the production version of this hits…….and it’s a Pacifica.

EPGCivic
EPGCivic
2 months ago
Reply to  sentinelTk

COTD

H4llelujah
H4llelujah
2 months ago

I don’t know what they were hoping for with this, but it definitely isn’t earning a positive response. Their FB post on this thing is just a feeding frenzy of people doing everything from laughing about to outright flaming it.

What’s really disheartening is knowing 1 of two things is going to happen after this:

A) Absolutely nothing; because this was just a “hold em over” measure because there is nothing in the pipeline for another year.

or

B) They’re going to have a knee jerk reaction and rush something re-badged and half baked to market.

Either way, it ain’t looking good. 🙁

Ranwhenparked
Ranwhenparked
2 months ago
Reply to  H4llelujah

There is an option C, which is that they have a real car that’s actually buildable that they’re just not showing us yet. Could be trying to do the old formula of showing a wildly impractical fantasy concept first and then follow up with the more ordinary production model that just takes a few styling cues.

Problem is that doesn’t work for the situation Chrysler is in right now, people want concrete proof there’s new product coming and a fantasy land concept doesn’t provide that any more than that sculpture thing Lancia did

86-GL
86-GL
2 months ago
Reply to  Ranwhenparked

Yeah they need something to sell, yesterday.

H4llelujah
H4llelujah
2 months ago
Reply to  Ranwhenparked

That would be terrific, but I feel like if that were going to happen, we would already have something. At least our stellantis trainers and reps would be giving us hints that something was coming down the line. Right now they dont even know if theyre going to do a Gladiator PHEV, which theyve hinted at, talked about, and at one point they said it was coming for 2024. And then, just, nothing.

You gotta understand, Ive been selling FCA/Stellantis for years, this kind of news directly affects the way I put food on the table. And for the past 3 years, the only times theyve actually done what said they were going to do was when they said they were killing the 200, The Dart, The Caravan, the Journey, the voyager, the Cherokee, the Challenger, the Charger, The 300, the renegade, and the V8 1/2 tons.

We’ve lost 9 nameplates since I started. I’m the top sales guy at a chrysler store with no competion in 30 minutes of driving distance. In the last year, I sold more used Ford Escapes than new Chrysler branded vehicles.

When I look at the profit Stellantis is making, and then I look at my W2’s, it’s hard not to be a little cynical.

Last edited 2 months ago by H4llelujah
Ranwhenparked
Ranwhenparked
2 months ago
Reply to  H4llelujah

Yeah, it’s pretty ridiculous, they have no plan, and whatever plans they show aren’t worth the kilobytes they take up. Even the Charger, which is happening, probably, maybe, still has loads of questions about it with details they’re just refusing to confirm for whatever reason

86-GL
86-GL
2 months ago
Reply to  H4llelujah

How did they let the Journey go without an immediate replacement? It may not have been the most refined vehicle on the road, but I swear it was pretty much the default family car in my area a few years ago. Insanity.

Chris Stevenson
Chris Stevenson
2 months ago
Reply to  86-GL

Agreed, a Chrysler replacement would have been perfect. Call it Voyager.

H4llelujah
H4llelujah
2 months ago
Reply to  86-GL

Right, it was actually a pretty dang good seller here. It wasnt glamorous, but it wasnt terrible at all, a reliable 3 row suv that could be bought for $25K out the door. How I wish we still had it.

Tbird
Tbird
2 months ago

They are lost. Just after my daughter was born I bought a used ’00 300M as a family car (I also owned ’99 Grand Cherokee). It was a roomy, comfortable car but the LH platform did have its weaknesses and was a maintenance nightmare. The interior plastics and leather held up quite well and suited near luxury car, but it ate tires and rusted quickly. A few years later I rented a new RWD 300, I liked the dynamics but was appalled by the cheap interior and poor visibility. I truly think the Daimler “merger” killed that company – they actually had GOOD product at the turn of the century.

Rust Buckets
Rust Buckets
2 months ago
Reply to  Tbird

“actually had good product”

“had it’s weaknesses and was a maintenance nightmare”

At the turn of the century, Chrysler was making the cloud cars, Neons, minivans, and pickups. They had Jeeps that were excellent vehicles, but that’s because they were mostly not engineered by Chrysler.

DubblewhopperInDubblejeopardy
DubblewhopperInDubblejeopardy
2 months ago

This has an eerily similar design to the ill-fated Chrysler(Lamborghini) Portofino, maybe it will end up in the bottom of the ocean too.

Maymar
Maymar
2 months ago

Seriously – down to the weird doors and the wheels, that’s the Portofino after 35 years of development (which is to say this is a next generation LH car if Chrysler hadn’t replaced them 20 years ago).

https://external-preview.redd.it/qeFeOjma1-LXGNG845vdNuDc3kZWFS0nY58sNieEE6o.jpg?auto=webp&s=64c6e49824bed9d050c88d8e1538d55f50456a93

MikuhlBrian
MikuhlBrian
2 months ago

This has been exactly my take, this is very Portofino. The oddly opening doors, base of the windshield pulled far forward (Cab-forward), sleek, low slung, single lightbar across the back. hell, even the wheel designs of the Halcyon are updated versions of the wheels on the Portofino.

Santiago Iglesias
Santiago Iglesias
2 months ago

They just straight up copied the Lightyear 0
https://ev-database.org/img/auto/Lightyear_0/Lightyear_0-01@2x.jpg

Turbeaux
Turbeaux
2 months ago

Wow, this is so disappointing. It’s not even a concept. It’s just a render, and one that could have been created 5 years ago. Also, with so many made up numbers, how is it only 95% sustainable? Surely stellantis can pull another 5% out of their ass.

Mike Smith
Mike Smith
2 months ago
Reply to  Turbeaux

Why stop there? “115% sustainable!” Beat that, Tesla. Hah!

Millermatic
Millermatic
2 months ago

“Halcyon”… denoting a period of time in the past that was idyllically happy and peaceful.

Maybe they should be more forward-thinking with the name? Harkening back to a better past… for a company with no clear future isn’t, perhaps, a great name.

Steve P
Steve P
2 months ago
Reply to  Millermatic

Apocalypse? Dystopia?

AlterId
AlterId
2 months ago
Reply to  Millermatic

Maybe “Halcion”. Sure, they’ll have to work something out with the drug manufacturer, but the symmetry of going from Benz to benzodiazepines wouldn’t be lost on true Chrysler fans.

Mr. Asa
Mr. Asa
2 months ago

Chrysler, one of the brands with the most bonkers color palettes out there, goes with grey for their concept car.

Cool cool cool. The future is boring. Got it.

BeepbeepJeep
BeepbeepJeep
2 months ago

I have always been a fan of Chrysler, but I am quite tired of them showing off pet projects while their anemic real world lineup continues to falter. The public has always reacted well to their design studies, but this whole pattern of showing off a “Pre production concept” available in 2 years needs to stop.

New Van, New 300, take the Wagoneer and Hornet and make them electric Chryslers, done.

Ottomadiq
Ottomadiq
2 months ago

What, we’re just not going to talk about the fact that Chrysler used a stock photo without paying??

Chrysler-Halcyon_Concept-2024-1280-06.jpg (1280×960) (netcarshow.com)

Horizontal View Empty Cement Floor Steel Stock Illustration 1994231504 | Shutterstock

Millermatic
Millermatic
2 months ago
Reply to  Ottomadiq

How do you know they didn’t pay?

Ottomadiq
Ottomadiq
2 months ago
Reply to  Millermatic

You see their official press release photo? It has a “Stock photo” watermark on it. It’s pretty hilarious. To be fair, they probably paid for it, they just didn’t pay the graphic designer enough to pay attention to the sample image. Ouch.

Last edited 2 months ago by Ottomadiq
Ranwhenparked
Ranwhenparked
2 months ago
Reply to  Ottomadiq

If they had paid for it, wouldn’t they have been able just to access the original copy without the watermark?

Ottomadiq
Ottomadiq
2 months ago
Reply to  Ranwhenparked

yes, but they didnt, which is why its funny

Toecutter
Toecutter
2 months ago

I like the body design, but not much else. This thing is so tech laden that massive problems are going to be inevitable.

Why can’t we have a 21st century EV drivetrain and a streamliner body, all wrapped in a package that is easy to work on with basic tools, uses real buttons for everything, and eschews all the tech crap in favor of being an inexpensive/reliable mode of transportation meant to last the buyer many decades or perhaps even a lifetime with minimal hassle and fuss?

Gubbin
Gubbin
2 months ago
Reply to  Toecutter

That’s the difference between folks like you and I, and folks who get paid to hype things. They got nothing but sizzle when all a body wants is a tasty meal.

Toecutter
Toecutter
2 months ago
Reply to  Gubbin

My problem is that the tasty meal is entirely off the menu, or if present at all, there’s no price listed and “ask server” instead. Which is why there isn’t a single new car that appeals to me.

An EV version of a 90s Honda Accord wagon, with about 1/3 the aero drag, would make a great/inexpensive family hauler.

Last edited 2 months ago by Toecutter
Freelivin1327
Freelivin1327
2 months ago
Reply to  Toecutter
Austin Vail
Austin Vail
2 months ago
Reply to  Toecutter

That’s the basic idea behind the Aptera, as I understand it (minus the buttons, the Aptera still has a stupid screen). They have stated they support right to repair, and the vehicles are about as aerodynamic as you can get, base price is about $18k before incentives, plus there’s built-in solar panels charging it so that’s neat. Not sure how many decades it would last, it’s mostly carbon fiber and aluminum IIRC so rust wouldn’t be an issue, but who knows how the battery will age yet or how replaceable it is. It’s still the one EV I’m genuinely interested in and would consider buying, although I do really wish it didn’t have a screen and that boring minimalist dashboard. That EV minimalist interior trend needs to die.

Toecutter
Toecutter
2 months ago
Reply to  Austin Vail

A minimalist interior with actual buttons for everything, and minimizing the number of features you need buttons for, would rule.

Austin Vail
Austin Vail
2 months ago
Reply to  Toecutter

Yeah that I could get behind, as it actually would follow what true minimalism was supposed to be – everything you need in its most rational form, nothing silly you don’t need, engineered to be thoughtful and equitable to benefit the largest number of people. That kind of minimalism would say screens are stupid, give it buttons. Modern “minimalist” design completely misses the point and aims for no design and the total elimination of rational controls for things…

I can get behind the original intent of minimalism, I just don’t like it now because it’s been idolized by generations of designers who have separated the aesthetic from the philosophy, and in doing so have utterly perverted its once-noble goals.

Last edited 2 months ago by Austin Vail
SAABstory
SAABstory
2 months ago

Ha, I needed a joke today. What, they were serious-ish?

That’s even funnier.

Geoffrey Reuther
Geoffrey Reuther
2 months ago
Reply to  SAABstory

still about 6 weeks till April Fool’s Day…

OnlyFlans
OnlyFlans
2 months ago

Lots of interesting ideas. Now, let’s level-set our expectations on what will make it to production:

1) Doors
2) Wheels
3) Illuminated Chrysler logo

Turbeaux
Turbeaux
2 months ago
Reply to  OnlyFlans

Maybe the footrest and the T-top

Ranwhenparked
Ranwhenparked
2 months ago
Reply to  OnlyFlans

I think the brake rotors might carry over

MaximillianMeen
MaximillianMeen
2 months ago
Reply to  OnlyFlans

The only thing that might make it to production is the gear select on the iPad.

Geoffrey Reuther
Geoffrey Reuther
2 months ago

Pardon me, I just threw up a little in my mouth there.

MaximillianMeen
MaximillianMeen
2 months ago

I didn’t say it was a good thing.

Bearddevil
Bearddevil
2 months ago

I like the way the exterior looks. Full marks there. But everything else… Woof. I hate pretty much everything about the interior, and all the futuristic tech-wank just seems like a waste of time for a dying brand that has ONE current vehicle. This really feels to me like a concept from the early 2000s, when things were still possible and optimism was a thing that existed, and Chrysler had a full product line, and there wasn’t such a terrible pressure to have something in production SOON to justify the continued existence of the brand.

They should have just dusted off the Portofino concept from the 90s, updated the drivetrain to EV, and showed us that. I’d be way more into that.

Ranwhenparked
Ranwhenparked
2 months ago

The thing with the Airflow has been ridiculous, it was completely practical and production ready, got a decent response from dealers and the press, then Christine Feuell became Chrysler brand manager, decided she liked the unbuilt alternative design proposal better, and ordered work on the original Airflow scrapped and a new version made based on that.

She’s also been insisting her belief that the passenger car segment (eg, not light trucks) is ready for a turnaround and that Chrysler should be the brand to make them relevant again.

I still think the alternate version of the electric crossover that’s not called Airflow anymore could still be hitting showrooms in 2025 and may have nothing to do with this Halcyon concept, and that this instead might have more to do with the Charger replacement and her desire to reinvigorate the car segment.

If the new Dodge Charger is coupe-only, replacing the Challenger, they might be giving Chrysler a sedan, replacing both the 300 and Charger, but it won’t look like this concept except in the very broadest details and won’t hit showrooms until a bit after 2025?

Austin Vail
Austin Vail
2 months ago
Reply to  Ranwhenparked

That theory would be especially interesting as it could allow for a twin turbo inline six in the new Chrysler as well… That’d be way more interesting than this rendering at least.

Clark B
Clark B
2 months ago

It looks like every generic, “this is the future!” concept car I’ve seen for the last 15 years, at least.

UnseenCat
UnseenCat
2 months ago

Having seen far too many people sticking their nasty feet on dashboards and out passenger-door windows in traffic for most of my life, I’ll pass on the “panoramic footrest” thankyouverymuch. Sorry, Chrysler, people are filthy animals with no respect for cars and we’d like for you to stop enabling them.

Aaron Nichols
Aaron Nichols
2 months ago

Couple of notes:
1: Doesn’t feel like a Chrysler. Its not stately enough. Not enough presence.
2: That front end won’t make it to production, without that front the whole rest of the car gets unbalanced front to back.
3: Someone stole the Lucid Air’s rear for this design.
4: Chrysler jumping into a full EV at the stage where alot of manufacturers are backing out seems…….apt for the whole Stellantis mindset.
This is a generic cookie cutter design that doesn’t give any Chrysler feel, wrong time, and design that can’t translate to production.

MDMK
MDMK
2 months ago

This Halcyon is gonna get raised a couple of inches, stuffed with a third row of seats for people who don’t like their kids and in-laws, and come out looking like a full sized Buick Envista isn’t it?

StillNotATony
StillNotATony
2 months ago
Reply to  MDMK

I think you’re right. Introducing a new sedan as the new hotness when the world has been moving steadily toward SUVs for – what? – 30+ years now? Brilliance in action!

James Davidson
James Davidson
2 months ago

Chrysler Management: What do we have?

Design Team: Nothing really…

Design Team: Well, actually we were voting on our favorite movie and video game cars of all time.

Chrysler Management: Fine. Show us the winning car.

Design Team: It was this one from Tron. We skipped a lot of the exterior lighting so it would look more production-ready.

Chrysler Management: Sweet! That’s pretty cool. Approved for the reveal next week. Get to Blender and start those renders. Nice job everyone!

Chrysler Management (after the design team leaves the conference room): I smell a little bump in our stock price next week. Take that Elon… Lunch?

Anders
Anders
2 months ago

Who needs a generative artificial intelligence software when Chrysler are so good at creating perfectly generic designs?

TheHairyNug
TheHairyNug
2 months ago

I was not expecting something unbaked from 2010

Spikedlemon
Spikedlemon
2 months ago

Those minimalistic seats have been all the rage for, what, 20 years of concept cars. Maybe it’s their time?

Taargus Taargus
Taargus Taargus
2 months ago

This is… disappointing. Like many others, I was hoping for a near production-ready concept. This is a brand that hasn’t presented a new product since the W administration!

It looks fine I guess, but it seems to be more or less a tech demo for features we will never see in a Chrysler.

Edit: By new product I mean a clean sheet, not a redesign of an existing model. The last redesigns for the brand were the Pacifica in 2017 and the 200 in 2015 (unless I’m missing something?). That’s fucking abysmal.

Last edited 2 months ago by Taargus Taargus
Adrian Clarke
Adrian Clarke
2 months ago

Blander than budget hotel art.

Col Lingus
Col Lingus
2 months ago
Reply to  Adrian Clarke

Shape and body lines have a weird deja vu thing going on here. Like faint memories of seeing stuff like this in the late 1960s and early 70s “future car” renderings.
Or maybe it was in a Hot Wheels package, either way not impressed.

You want to sell cars boys? Bring back the 69 Road Runners and Super Bees.
Thanks DT.

Last edited 2 months ago by Col Lingus
Jonathan Hendry
Jonathan Hendry
2 months ago
Reply to  Col Lingus

I’m sorry this is 2024, best we can get is Super Beets.

Geoff Buchholz
Geoff Buchholz
2 months ago
Reply to  Adrian Clarke

This is the take I was hoping for. Thank you, Uncle Ade.

Cheap Bastard
Cheap Bastard
2 months ago
Reply to  Adrian Clarke

No sad clown face so there’s that.

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