Home » One Year With The Ford Maverick: An Almost Perfect Truck

One Year With The Ford Maverick: An Almost Perfect Truck

Maverick One Year Ts1
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As you may already know, I’ve been driving the Maverick for a while now and I’m head over heels for it. It’s hands down the best all-around ride I’ve ever owned. From outdoor adventures to everyday life, it meets all my needs with ease. Ford really hit it out of the park with this one. But as with anything, especially a first iteration, some areas could use improvement.

[Ed note: Johnathon is back around this weekend with another update on his Ford Maverick. You may remember his first story last week about buying it. That one was on me because I angled it a little more towards ‘look at this flip’ than ‘here’s a random thing that happened to me I didn’t plan.’

Vidframe Min Top
Vidframe Min Bottom

In particular, I added “Here’s Why This Turned Out To Be A Genius Move’ to the headline as a callback to “I Bought A High-Mileage Electric Car With A Bad Battery. Here’s Why That Was Actually A Stroke of Genius.” I think that ended up making the post seem a little more calculated than it was. My bad! Here’s a story we can all get behind. – MH]

Pro 1: The Maverick Is Virtually An SUV With A Small Bed

It’s a compromise sure, but for most daily purposes, for most people, the SUV aspect is a good thing. The Maverick is based on Ford’s C2 platform, which is the platform for the Escape and slightly modified for the Bronco Sport. It’s been further tweaked for the Maverick to accommodate the longer wheelbase and the demands of a truck. In my experience, it comfortably accommodates four people, with better spacing and ergonomics than a Toyota Tacoma TRD. It’s pleasant enough to drive, handling moderately rough roads with ease without ever feeling like it’s trying to beat you up. Oh, and the bed itself has been life-changing.

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On a trip to Wisconsin last year for the Bristol Renaissance Fair, a store in downtown Kenosha was holding a going-out-of-business sale. My significant other spotted two bookshelves she thought would be perfect for her classroom. All I had to do was drop the gate and strap down the shelves, and we were good to go. The memes I’ve previously seen with Miata owners and having infinite space for storage apply here, but it’s actually practical. That’s something I never would have considered doing before the Maverick.

Con 1: A Cheap Ride That Feels Cheap

It’s budget-friendly, which is great for consumers, but Ford aggressively cut corners. While the Ford-branded screws add a rugged touch, much of the interior is hard plastic, especially the center dash insert. I have remarked to many an Autopian that this looks like it’s straight out of a Fisher-Price playhouse. Just because a car is affordable doesn’t mean the interior has to feel cheap.

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A floor model Maverick XLT at the 2021 Motor Bella.

GM has managed to strike the right balance with models like the refreshed Chevrolet Trax and the Buick Envista. My 2018 Hyundai Elantra GT was also an economy car, but the interior looked nice at a glance, with soft-touch areas and a dash that resembled pleather. Plus, it didn’t easily scratch.

2018 Elantra Gt
This is the Sport trim with red accents, different pedals, and nicer seats, but otherwise the same as the base model.
Photo: Hyundai

By comparison, the plastic in the Maverick scratches by just looking at it, and the dash aggressively squeaks in the cold. Oh and don’t get me started on the rotary dial. While it saves Ford money not to have a handlebar shifter, I’d much prefer something like the one in the F-150–which uses the same plug–or just put the damn shifter on the dash or steering column to claw back more space.

Pro 2: The Gas Mileage Is Outstanding

The Ford Maverick is a truck that actually lives up to the promise of hybrid fuel efficiency. I’m looking at you Tacoma and your I-Force technology’s 21 mpg. While it could be more aerodynamic, it performs admirably on country roads. It easily reaches mid-40 mpg or better on 55 mph highways, outside of winter. The hybrid system also helps reduce the usual penalties in stop-and-go traffic and the small 1.1 kWh battery occasionally accommodates electric-only driving, either when gently accelerating or at constant speeds below 60 miles per hour.

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Yeah, the plastic is a dust magnet.

It’s a fun game to see how far I can go on electric power alone on empty backroads. For the price point, there’s nothing else on the market with this level of utility that offers such efficiency.

Con 2: It’s Not A Capital ‘T’ Truck

While this SUV-truck hybrid is a major plus, there are times when being in between is limiting. The max towing capacity for the hybrid model is 2,000 lbs. That’s great for small U-Hauls and tiny campers, but I’ve had to make additional trips during moves due to those restrictions. It’s also a limiting factor for the toys one could haul with it. In a perfect world, I’d love a 16-foot Scamp fiberglass trailer with a bathroom. Stories of awful leaks have made me quite apprehensive about campers built with traditional materials, so fiberglass or thermoplastic sounds incredibly appealing. However, owners of 16ft Scamps report a dry weight of 2,400-2,600 lbs.  depending on options.  Toyota has already demonstrated with the RAV4 Prime that plug-in versions can handle more, I’d love for Ford to answer the bell with a PHEV Maverick.

Rav4 Towing Unmarked
Photo: Toyota

Pro 3: It’s Handsome As Hell

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Ford nailed the design. Unlike the Hyundai Santa Cruz, the Maverick’s design has been universally praised. It’s unmistakably an American truck. I’ve been stopped multiple times by people who were curious about it. Its slightly aggressive lines convey that it’s a trucklet that can be treated like a truck, to an extent. Plus, the bed is cleverly designed with cutouts for dividers, and an adjustable tailgate that can help panels sit flat on the wheel wells,  making it convenient for everything from runs to the hardware store to camping.

Con 4: The Infotainment System Is Lacking

The Maverick’s budget-friendly nature extends to its infotainment system. Lariat models use Sync 3 but the XL and XLT trims use “Connected Touch Radio”,  which is slow and prone to freezing. Hard resets have become second nature to me, but it’s not ideal, especially in the middle of a road trip when you need maps for upcoming turns.

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2022 Ford Maverick Hybrid Xlt
“You’re music’s bad and you should feel bad!” is what it feels like Ford is trying to tell me every time the Connected Touch Radio freezes up.  Photo: Ford

The system also struggles to decide whether to play the radio, a basic feature that works seamlessly in other cars I’ve driven. And don’t even get me started on the backup camera. It’s laggy and has low resolution, which is a major safety concern. At times it feels like it was added on to meet government mandates rather than being a useful feature.

Pro 4: The Perfect Footprint

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A third-gen Ford Ranger and a 2023 Ford Maverick. Like two brothers.

The Maverick is almost identical in length to the third-gen Ranger (199.7″ vs. 203.6″)  but it’s capabilities as a daily driver are more well-rounded. One of the best parts about driving this around compared to a modern Ranger or F-150, I’m not scared trying to navigate tight neighborhoods in major cities like Detroit and Chicago. Parking is also a breeze.

And There’s So Much More

There are a lot of random, small charming features about the Maverick. I’ll quickly list those below just to reinforce how much the good heavily outweighs any annoyances. Those include:

  • The XLT’s charming navy blue and orange color combination is featured throughout the interior and on the seats. Perfect for Tigers country.
  • Cupholders. Cupholders everywhere. There are six usable spots for water bottles accessible from the front seats alone – two per door and the cupholders in the armrest. Add in the backseat’s flip-down armrest, the rear doors’ cupholders, and a FITs cupholder, and you’re going to stay well hydrated.
  • The FITs system opens up nifty little add-ons with 3D printing. In addition to the cupholder, I’ve seen hooks for grocery bags, a mini garbage bin, and cable organizers. But with Ford openly sharing the schematics from the start, the only limit is your imagination.
  • There’s storage under the backseat. The entire space is fully usable on the EcoBoost models. There’s slightly less on the hybrid version with the 12v battery taking up part. I use this compartment to store a socket wrench set, duct tape, a battery jump pack, and a mini 12v tire inflator.
  • There’s a frickin bottle opener on both sides of the tailgate. Completely unnecessary but it’s delightful to have while tailgating.
2022 Ford Maverick Flexbed™
Photo: Ford
  • While the screen is small the cubby is cute. It fits the truck’s overall ethos of smartly utilizing space.
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My Grogu cubby-buddy.

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Hugh Crawford
Hugh Crawford
1 month ago

Almost the utility of a car sized station wagon except the stuff in the way back gets snow, rain, and dust on it.

I like the minimalist vibe though. How about a car version?

Reasonable Pushrod
Reasonable Pushrod
1 month ago
Reply to  Hugh Crawford

Truck beds are fantastic for tall items and anything dirty, sharp, or smelly that you wouldn’t want in an interior space. Ford is absolutely missing an opportunity to sell a Wagon version of this though.

TDI_FTW
TDI_FTW
1 month ago
Reply to  Hugh Crawford

They make a cap for it, if you want it to be a station wagon just get that. Added benefit is that you get both options, and you get the sedan-like function of a separate zone to keep smelly stuff in.

Bongo Friendee Harvey Park
Bongo Friendee Harvey Park
1 month ago

Matt Hardigree is crying in a corner

ProudLuddite
ProudLuddite
1 month ago

Most of the minuses I don’t care about except the plastic scratching easily. Might have to check one of these out in a few years.

P.S. Are there still supply problems? I don’t see many of these on the road.

Last edited 1 month ago by ProudLuddite
Morgan van Humbeck
Morgan van Humbeck
1 month ago
Reply to  ProudLuddite

Definitely a couple months ago dealerships couldn’t get them. Don’t know how it is now

The48thRonin
The48thRonin
1 month ago
Reply to  ProudLuddite

I see a bunch up here, especially on the highway. Although it is the midwest..

ProudLuddite
ProudLuddite
1 month ago
Reply to  The48thRonin

I am in the Midwest too, Nebraska, tons of full sized trucks, but Mavericks are still pretty rare. I think I see more Santa Cruz’s than Mavericks

Spikersaurusrex
Spikersaurusrex
1 month ago
Reply to  ProudLuddite

For what it’s worth, I haven’t had any trouble with the plastic in mine scratching easily, but maybe that because I keep the scrap metal and bricks in the bed…

Gene1969
Gene1969
1 month ago

Thanks for the update. I was thinking, have you tried sanding scratches in the plastic with 500 grit sandpaper or higher to smooth it out?

I always thought that the Maverick is the large end of the funnel for new pickup truck owners. It’s a great alternative for an Outback, Forrester, Prius, or other adventure vehicles or commuters. Yes, it has its own compromises that other vehicles beat but it all evens out in the general look. The subtleties are what decide the final choice.

Like you, I also think that the Hybrid should have a higher towing rate. To be honest, it should be the same as the 2.0 engines.

Just for reference, That Ranger in the picture is narrower than the Maverick and has a smaller footprint do it would need to get a slightly higher mpg to be legal today.

Matt Dieter
Matt Dieter
1 month ago
Reply to  Gene1969

If you read the Maverick forums, the hybrid is more capable than Ford rates it to. The trans is all gears, so no clutches to slip, and brakes are the same. Some of the guys will run them with a trans temp monitor through forscan, and have towed 3k+ lb no problem.

Not that I have either or anything…

Gene1969
Gene1969
1 month ago
Reply to  Matt Dieter

I figured Ford was being conservative to keep people “in the acceptable range” when they do tow because so many tow past the stated limit.

VanGuy
VanGuy
1 month ago

Damn, 2,000 pound towing capacity?
That’s roughly the tow rating of my Prius once I add a bolt-on hitch.

BolognaBurrito
BolognaBurrito
1 month ago
Reply to  VanGuy

I thought Toyota claimed the Prius has no tow rating in the US.

VanGuy
VanGuy
1 month ago
Reply to  BolognaBurrito

Maybe when tested at the US standard of 80 mph…

Either way, at worst all I’d ever use it for is the smallest enclosed U-Haul trailer or up to 300 pounds tongue weight on a small cargo platform.

More just making the comparison–the fact it’s possible is a wild comparison if that’s all certain Mavericks are rated for.

BolognaBurrito
BolognaBurrito
1 month ago
Reply to  VanGuy

Look, I understand the argument of US vs European tow ratings, and that the Prius isn’t rated likely due to an abundance of caution, but the Mavericks rating and lack of one on a Prius isn’t roughly the same at all.

Baja_Engineer
Baja_Engineer
1 month ago
Reply to  VanGuy

that’s weird considering Toyota will also sell you a Rav4 Hybrid with only 1500lbs tow rating. Want an extra 1000lbs? You’ll need to step up for a Prime (PHEV) model

VanGuy
VanGuy
1 month ago
Reply to  John Gustin

Nah, I’m in Pennsylvania.
Mine’s a 2012 v, so maybe that’s why I’m finding bolt-on hitch receivers claiming that much.

As I said–not planning to push that to its limit. And I’m guessing a Maverick will do better in terms of towing and hauling simultaneously, especially if it can come from the factory with that capability.

Last edited 1 month ago by VanGuy
VanGuy
VanGuy
1 month ago
Reply to  John Gustin

Right, I have seen that. The bolt-on hitches themselves are typically showing 3,500 pounds or more, but limiting to 2,000 for the car. Similar for tongue weight.

TDI_FTW
TDI_FTW
1 month ago
Reply to  VanGuy

Your hitch receiver should be rated for more than your tow rating. This allows you to be slightly off on your CG of your trailer and have a higher tongue weight. I sure as hell am not going to go to the scales to get it perfect.
For example, my car has a 1k tow rating, but the hitch I got has a rating of 2k. This allows the tongue weight to go to 200 lb before the receiver will have issues.

Autopizen
Autopizen
1 month ago

The perfect truck is a Toyota T100 or 1st gen. Tundra, if you can find one. If not, early 2000s Tacoma. Just saying.

Jacob Rippey
Jacob Rippey
1 month ago
Reply to  Autopizen

T100’s are so underrated. Built on HINO’s assy line and was the last Toyota pickup sold in the US that was assembled in Japan. Incredible longevity and build quality.

pizzaman09
pizzaman09
30 days ago
Reply to  Autopizen

On the same topic, the Jeep Comanche is a perfect truck. I cross shopped the Comanche with the Maverick, in the end the Maverick was larger, had less payload, but acceled in fuel economy. I went with the Comanche as I wanted a small easy to maneuver truck and the Maverick’s back seats and shorter bed just weren’t all that useful to me. The Comanche I found has a 4000 lb towing capacity, 4×4 with an LSD and a fun to drive 5 speed manual attached to the bullet proof AMC 4.0L.

The vintage Toyota trucks you mention are awesome, I have a coworker with a manual T100 and I quite like it. I’ve driven a few Tacos and the only thing they lack is power, otherwise they are perfect too!

Eggsalad
Eggsalad
1 month ago

I wanted an XL Hybrid. But right now, the price is the same as a base Prius. And to be fair, the base Prius has a lot more “stuff” than a Maverick XL. They’re entirely different form factors, which makes it seem like a weird comparison. But is it, really? Toyota wins hands down on durability and reliability and lack of recalls.

For $22k, the Maverick was a good choice. But at 27.5k, it isn’t.

pizzaman09
pizzaman09
30 days ago
Reply to  Eggsalad

The new Prius is also the best looking vehicle on sale today! I can totally see cross shopping them is light hauling isn’t really a need.

Crank Shaft
Crank Shaft
1 month ago

Go Grogu! (that’s my favorite part of the story.)

Fuzzyweis
Fuzzyweis
1 month ago

Glad the Matt cleared up the slant on the previous article. I love seeing Mavericks around, I’ve got a 2000 Ranger so as the French in Monty Python say, we’ve already got one.

But if they came out with a PHEV Maverick I’d be really tempted, think they don’t as they’re selling those as Escapes, gotta have some reason to buy an Escape instead of a Bronco Sport or Maverick.

I’m surprised by the plasticky interior but also some weird other choices, base models didn’t even have cruise control, but that’s just like a button now, just a bizarre choice.

Last edited 1 month ago by Fuzzyweis
Dead Elvis, Inc.
Dead Elvis, Inc.
1 month ago
Reply to  Fuzzyweis

Glad the Matt cleared up the slant on the previous article.

I missed that – got a link?

Fuzzyweis
Fuzzyweis
1 month ago

This one, came across like he intentionally gamed the system when Mavericks were backordered up the wazoo. And one of his first articles here so wasn’t too warm a welcome.

https://www.theautopian.com/i-ordered-two-identical-trucks-from-two-different-dealers-heres-why-this-turned-out-to-be-a-genius-move/

Dead Elvis, Inc.
Dead Elvis, Inc.
1 month ago
Reply to  Fuzzyweis

Sorry, I wasn’t clear – I’d read the original article, but managed to miss where Matt addressed it. Just now realized I’d skipped right past his editor’s note above.

Slow Joe Crow
Slow Joe Crow
1 month ago

I’d seriously consider a Maverick if I had the money, but it would replace the Mazda CX-5 and not the old F150. The Mazdas cramped rear seat and high belt lines make it the replacement candidate. I live in a semi rural area so I have room to park a great big truck for occasional use, and that’s what my F150 is for, hauling big stuff, towing and occasional stand-in duty when the car isn’t available.
Also nagging in the back of my mind is the stone like reliability of Mazda versus recent Fords. The CX-5 is the same platform but the Skyactiv G and conventional automatic just work unlike the Ecoboost and Powershift.

Jacob Rippey
Jacob Rippey
1 month ago
Reply to  Slow Joe Crow

The EB engines don’t come with a dual clutch Powershift; they come with conventional 8 speed autos, which have been pretty decent reliability-wise

Geoff Buchholz
Geoff Buchholz
1 month ago

John, glad to see you’re enjoying the Mav! Were I to buy one, it’d probably be that spec … so your thoughts, especially re interior quality, are appreciated.

Also, kudos to you and Hardigree on your transparency about the decision-making tied to the earlier piece. That level of reflection and responsiveness is refreshing, and is one of the things I appreciate about this site.

Also also: who is that nice doggo?

John E
John E
1 month ago

I’d buy a hybrid version if Ford wasn’t artificially choking supply to keep their margins up. And since they raised the base price by $5k, they can shove them where the sun is seldom seen. People think these are such a “bargain” but conveniently forget these were introduced to replace the Fiesta and Focus, $15k-$22k cars. If Toyota produces a competitor, they’ll be WORSE. They’ll announce a $22k base price but you’ll be hard pressed to find one less than $30k on lots. Millennial and genZ buyers have only themselves to blame for being priced out of the market. They don’t have the slightest idea of delayed gratification. It’s all “I want it now, price be damned” and car manufacturers are pleased to oblige.

The Mark
The Mark
1 month ago

How do you keep Grogu in his cubby when you accelerate?

Detroit Lightning
Detroit Lightning
1 month ago

Had a complete base model XL hybrid a few years back that I stumbled into with the person ordering not wanting it. It was a great vehicle, but ultimately not quite what I wanted.

Having something that plugs in is probably a requirement for me when I’m shopping again in ~2 years, so we’ll see what the market looks like then. But if Ford can release an AWD hybrid, I’d strongly consider it.

Totally agree on the hard plastics – the scratching was a real issue.

As many have mentioned, I’m still shocked that nobody else has made an effort to complete in this segment. I parked next to an older single cab S-10 the other day and couldn’t believe how tiny it seemed…there’s room in this market for more options!

DialMforMiata
DialMforMiata
1 month ago

I love everything about the Maverick but that blue oval. It’s such an appealing package but I just can’t bring myself to trust Ford these days, not until they get their QC issues sorted.

Speedway Sammy
Speedway Sammy
1 month ago
Reply to  DialMforMiata

The service queue at my local Ford store always has a huge lineup. Lights are on late at night during the week too, double shifts. Ford spent almost 5bil on warranty in 2023. Plenty of work if you’re a Ford service tech.

Spikersaurusrex
Spikersaurusrex
1 month ago
Reply to  DialMforMiata

It’s not been a big deal, really. My dealer gives free car washes, so every time I get a recall, the truck gets washed. It’s the cleanest truck I’ve ever owned (because it spends so much time at the dealership, in case it’s not obvious).

The recalls really are annoying, but otherwise it’s a great little trucklet.

Hoan
Hoan
1 month ago

Kenosha, not Genosha

DialMforMiata
DialMforMiata
1 month ago
Reply to  Hoan

A Genoshan renaissance festival would be pretty wild, though.

DialMforMiata
DialMforMiata
1 month ago
Reply to  John Gustin

Yeah, their last festival didn’t end so well.

Gene1969
Gene1969
1 month ago
Reply to  DialMforMiata

Hey! It was the ultimate Burning Man festival.

beachbumberry
beachbumberry
1 month ago

Great article! I REALLY like the maverick and I’m going to be in that TINY minority that would love a small bench up front. I have 4 kids. I need 6 seats. But for my back and forth to work, I don’t need it all the time (the expedition max is the family truck and tow rig). Being able to fit everyone in a fuel efficient, practical vehicle when needed would be awesome! I had a 1st gen Colorado crew cab and never had an issue fitting 6 people with the bench in a pinch. Just need that.

For that matter, a bench in the power boost f150 or lightning would be great too.

Box Rocket
Box Rocket
1 month ago

@John: Thanks for sharing, and providing more content, especially after the unfair knee-jerk reaction the commentariat had on your last article. I look forward to more!

@Matt Hardigree: Thanks for taking ownership of the editorial decisions. I think it was a lesson in maybe not using as much if any hyperbole and sensationalistic verbiage, especially for headlines. Autopian already has a bit of a reputation for this (e.g. is everything a “holy grail”?). Yes, we want the site to succeed and clicks are required for that, but we don’t want the bad parts of the old gawker-owned site. Quality content is stronger than “click-bait”.

Gene1969
Gene1969
1 month ago
Reply to  Box Rocket

This.

Last edited 1 month ago by Gene1969
Col Lingus
Col Lingus
1 month ago
Reply to  Box Rocket

Yeah same here. Appreciated your articles John. Did not appreciate the showing of asses by some of the others here. Context is a thing. As is not being a half wit asshole, especially if you don’t have all the facts.

Judgement can be a double edged sword guys.

Last edited 1 month ago by Col Lingus
Jack Trade
Jack Trade
1 month ago

Are the analog gauges physical? That’s what it looks like but it’s hard to be sure.

The “cheap feel” con is interestingly a problem my Focus has. A ton of hard plastic, and I always get nervous about cleaning the plastic gauge cover. Mine goes for racy sleek instead of blocky functional, but the overall effect is exactly the same. Seems to be something Ford really struggles with.

Box Rocket
Box Rocket
1 month ago
Reply to  Jack Trade

I believe the gauges in all the modern Escape platform models are digital only. There’s a bunch of Maverick owners who have swapped their gauge clusters for upgraded versions (bigger screens with more functions) from other Ford products.

Jack Trade
Jack Trade
1 month ago
Reply to  John Gustin

Cool. There’s something fitting, at least for now, about a pickup truck having at least a few analog things.

Rabob Rabob
Rabob Rabob
1 month ago

Still surprised that nobody outside of Hyundai has tried to build a competitor. These things are everywhere in SoCal despite Ford botching the delivery process and being supply constrained for so long.

Box Rocket
Box Rocket
1 month ago
Reply to  Rabob Rabob

Stellantis is developing the Rampage, but I haven’t heard that it’s definitely coming to the US/Canada. Given FCA’s record with small vehicles (Fiat 500 models, Renegade, compass, Cherokee, hornet, tonale, etc.) I’d give it quite a wide berth until proven otherwise.

Roofless
Roofless
1 month ago
Reply to  John Gustin

Oh, Toyota.

Build a small truck -> make it bigger -> make it bigger -> make it bigger -> see market opportunity for small truck -> build a small truck (we are here) ->

Jacob Rippey
Jacob Rippey
1 month ago
Reply to  Roofless

If Toyota can pull off a small mini truck a la Maverick (instead of Santa Cruz), I’d be all about that. Make it look like a truck. Give it some off road cred without making it useless as a daily. Decent fuel economy.

Baja_Engineer
Baja_Engineer
1 month ago
Reply to  Jacob Rippey

My guess is they won’t bring any small truck to North America to not cut into their golden child’s (Tacoma) sales. Ford doesn’t sell many Rangers but Toyota sales a ton of high profit Tacomas

V10omous
V10omous
1 month ago

That one was on me because I angled it a little more towards ‘look at this flip’ than ‘here’s a random thing that happened to me I didn’t plan.’

I think it’s noble you’re falling on the sword here, but going to two dealers and ordering two trucks (knowing you will only keep one) isn’t random or unplanned, it’s flipping.

Of course it’s legal, capitalism, etc, all the defenses offered in the first article’s comments, but that doesn’t make it less distasteful.

Not going to draw this out or comment any further on something a week old, just want to complete my thoughts from then. Carry on.

Last edited 1 month ago by V10omous
V10omous
V10omous
1 month ago
Reply to  John Gustin

I appreciate the kind words and the response.

I’m legitimately glad the situation worked out well for you personally and you got a truck you enjoy.

My personal feelings on the matter are complicated by the fact that I’ve spent the better part of three years shopping (with varying degrees of seriousness) for limited production vehicles that have been egregiously and flagrantly bought up and flipped for tens of thousands over MSRP. I don’t expect anyone to feel sorry for me, but it does color my view of your situation, perhaps unfairly.

In any case, I enjoy your writing and will continue to read.

Goof
Goof
1 month ago
Reply to  V10omous

Yeah, kind of feel the same way. In this case I’m liable to give it more of a pass because this is someone who at least benefit from getting money towards something they’ll actually use, instead of just being opportunistic.

I’m in the boat where I’m supposedly getting demand release and actual allocation for something in ~4 months, and I’ve called a third of the dealers in the country and… I’m not paying less ADM than $40K, and most dealers want $50-70K. At least in the current market and I. Have. Tried.

Meanwhile, local dealers are selling this model, which were all “bridge cars” purchased by their usual palm greasers, who bought the cars to garage for 25 to 250 miles to sell it right back. So the dealers now put a $40-60K markup on something the first owner had zero interest in (aside from maintaining status with the dealer), and those who will actually own them have to pay over for a spec they had no say in (often with hideous choices).

Sadly, I actually count my blessings that I’m actually going to get to build my car, whether it’s from a relationship I’ve built over 15 years (only buying one prior car!) or another connection I’ve made. I played the game as cheap as humanly possible, but it’s still not cheap.

Rubbit
Rubbit
1 month ago

Where did you put your groceries? I’m not referring to small bag that everyone puts in the front seat. I’m talking about 10- 15 bags that you would not want to go flying.

Rabob Rabob
Rabob Rabob
1 month ago
Reply to  Rubbit

I have a single cab truck so even less space than a Maverick. I throw them in the bed if I got a lot. Sometimes they slide around. No big deal. I had a big plastic tub strapped back there for a while to catch misc things.

Box Rocket
Box Rocket
1 month ago
Reply to  Rubbit

Bed dividers allow for groceries to go in numerous places and not move around (much), and there are ways to cover the bed contents. Also the back seat (which is what I would use unless it were occupied).

86-GL
86-GL
1 month ago
Reply to  Rubbit

The back passenger area, with the seats flipped up or down is still the preferred delicate cargo spot, and the best thing about 4 door trucks in general.

That said, in the bed under a tonneau cover, with a couple of bins or insta-crates to keep the small bags in one spot works really well for those ‘big shops’. Even better if your grocery store keeps their cardboard produce boxes by the cash to pack your items in.

A mostly water-tight trifold tonneau cover really makes 4 door trucks function like a more versatile sedan, and is essential to unlocking the complete functionality of a truck like the Maverick.

Slow Joe Crow
Slow Joe Crow
1 month ago
Reply to  Rubbit

I carry groceries in the back seat of my extended cab. Way back when I owned a single cab Ranger they went in the bed on a,day without rain

Gene1969
Gene1969
1 month ago
Reply to  Slow Joe Crow

With the handles of the bags tied in a soft knot so things don’t spill out.

Isaac
Isaac
1 month ago

I have a 23 EB AWD. Everything you said is true, except I disagree on the radio struggling to work and the poor resolution back up camera.
All in all, I’ve been impressed with my Maverick! It serves as our family car for my wife and son and I now understand why people drive crew cab trucks as family cars. The bed cab swallow way more baby stuff than you’d be able to fit in a sedan or compact CUV. They only thing that has more versatility is a minivan.

Zipn Zipn
Zipn Zipn
1 month ago

We have A 23 bolt euv ( and 2 Miata’s) and also a company car. The company car ( currently a penalty Altima) is our go-to for road trips for obvious reasons plus the gas expenses are included. The Bolt (super bargain and surprising great little around town car) will get maybe 90 pct of the trips we take but it the ev charging infrastructure isn’t there yet for road trips. I retire at the end of the year and was pretty sure I would get a C8 to be our Grand Tourer but the practical part of me says I’ve already got fantastic sports cars (91 British Racing Green 5 speed SE stock Miata for the purist and a wicked-quick turbo-modified 2010 Miata 6 speed GT power hard top , both in great shape and very low miles).

My latest plan is to replace the POS Altima with a 25 Maverick as soon as the books open. Going hybrid as I rarely tow. We’ll make it our road-trip car. I assume the highway ride and noise will be acceptable. I hope the performance will be too. We’re going to order a top of the line lariat and expect the 25 refresh will include Sync4 and wireless car play, which will be a nice update. I like the great MPG, the lower initial cost and assuming lower insurance costs.

Any comments on ride and power on the hybrid?

Last edited 1 month ago by Zipn Zipn
Spikersaurusrex
Spikersaurusrex
1 month ago
Reply to  Zipn Zipn

I have a ’22 hybrid and I find it quite comfortable. It’s nowhere near as stiff as a circa 2010 bmw. The longest trip I’ve made was about 300 miles, all highway, and I wasn’t too tired when I finished. Also, it’s not overly loud at highway speeds. I don’t know the actual spec, but I’ve never had any trouble merging onto a 70mph highway either, even with traffic routinely exceeding the speed limit and short merge lanes.

RataTejas
RataTejas
1 month ago
Reply to  Zipn Zipn

We have a ’23 Lariat Hybrid, and have road tripped a fair bit. Longest from DFW to Nashville. Rides nice, seats are adjustable enough to find your sweet spot. NVH is better than what I was expecting. Performance is ok. Will toodle along as fast as you like. Sweet spot is 70ish. Once you hit 80, the fuel economy dives. At speed, you need to plan your passes, as the CVT will get you there, just not immediately.

10/10 would buy again. And get a hard tonneau.

Ariel E Jones
Ariel E Jones
1 month ago

People enjoy arguing over “What is a truck?”
Let’s skip that. Whatever you may or may not want to label this, it’s a great vehicle. It ticks a lot of boxes for a lot of people and does them well. Add in handsome styling and a really affordable price point and you have a winner.
I think there’s a lesson here for other manufacturers.

Footlongcone
Footlongcone
1 month ago
Reply to  Ariel E Jones

Exactly. I’m still hoping to look at a hybrid when we replace our old Mazda5. Similar overall size but better fuel efficiency, better cargo capacity (weight) with a bit more flexibility. It’s all the truck I’m likely to ever need/want short of a uhaul every 5-10 years.

Spikersaurusrex
Spikersaurusrex
1 month ago
Reply to  John Gustin

They’re more like guidelines. (To steal a line from Pirates of the Caribbean.)

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