Home » Start Your Day With A Cappuccino, Served Under A Case: Cold Start

Start Your Day With A Cappuccino, Served Under A Case: Cold Start

Cs Cap Combine 1
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Personally, I think there are lots of under-appreciated advantages to driving genuinely tiny cars. There’s the maneuverability, ease of parking almost anywhere, efficiency, fuel economy, fun car-as-motorized-pants feeling, and, perhaps most importantly, the ability to, if needed, drive unimpeded underneath a an agricultural sprayer, like a a Case-IH Patriot 3250. That’s what we’re seeing here, with my friend Attila wonderful little Suzuki Cappuccino, parked cozily between the wheels of this large sprayer.

The Cappuccino is a fantastic little car – made from 1991 to 1998 this was Suzuki’s diminutive halo car, a Kei-class vehicle that wasn’t designed to maximize space and utility within the restrictive volumes of the Kei class, as is usually done, but instead was part of that small subsection of Kei cars like the Honda Beat or the Autozam AZ-1 that instead tried to wring as much fun as possible out of that minuscule Kei envelope and all 660cc of engine. And that engine was a dual overhead cam 12-valve three-cylinder with an intercooled turbocharger, making the maximum allowed Kei power of 64 hp.

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There’s so much to like about the little Cappuccino; it’s a front-mid engine layout, with perfect 50/50 weight distribution when at full capacity of two, the smallest possible plural number, rear-wheel drive and weighing only about 1600 pounds. It’s the Miata for people who just can’t abide the bulk of a Miata.

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I really like these pics that Attila took of his car, because it shows the scale in such a nice dramatic way, and immediately forces your mind into imagining the yet-to-be-made movie that involves a car chase where a Cappuccino is being pursued across some Kansasian farmscapes and manages to evade its pursuers with some slick driving under a few of these sprayers.

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Hopefully there would be a sprayer in motion that the Cap would drive under at just the right speed to hide from the chasing baddies, whomever they are.

You know what else is fun about a Cappuccino? The roof! There’s so many ways to configure that roof! Pure convertible, targa style, T-top – here, someone made a video showing all of it; I think the coolest part is how the rear window drops behind the seats so seamlessly:

These are so much fun. Oh, and get this – the Cappuccino may also hold the record for the highest ratio of brochures to cars sold, ever. You see, the Cappuccino was really only made for the Japanese domestic market, though some were sent to the UK, where the right-hand-drive design also worked. There was never an intention to sell the car in left-hand-drive markets.

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For whatever reason, Suzuki decided to show the Cappuccino at the 1993 Amsterdam Motor Show, and, unsurprisingly, it generated a lot of positive attention, though all the excited journalists lamented that they’d never get the car there, something that’s very familiar to non-Japanese people when talking about Kei cars.

But those journalists were wrong! Sort of! Suzuki decided what the hell, let’s sell some Cappuccinos to the Netherlands, and by some I mean 25. Incredibly, for an entire Dutch inventory of 25 cars, Suzuki printed a whole, full-color brochure, in numbers far beyond the amount of Cappuccinos sent to the Netherlands.

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It seems ridiculous, right? The car was able to meet Dutch standards, but was a RHD car in an LHD country and was really expensive compared to other cars on the market. It’s all sort of madness, which is why it’s also so wonderful.

There was a more rational reason, of course: the Cappuccino was a halo car, designed to bring positive attention to Suzuki. And it did that. Here’s a whole little video about this Dutch brochure:

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Amazing, right? Halo car goals aside, this still has to be the most brochures ever made for the least amount of cars.

Anyway, if you’re expecting to be chased by people in an area with a lot of large agricultural sprayers and need to be sure you can get away, I suggest looking into importing a Suzuki Cappuccino. You’re welcome.

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Freelivin2713
Freelivin2713
18 days ago

I love the Cappuccino! It’s basically my favorite name for a car and want one someday

Elhigh
Elhigh
22 days ago

I’ve seen pix of cars under sprayers before, but this is the first time it looked like the car was driven under there and then the driver successfully got out of the car. There’s room to spare.

Banpei
Banpei
23 days ago

Wow, that’s a throwback! I made that video more than seven years ago!
I’m glad you enjoyed the video and it’s contents!

Last edited 23 days ago by Banpei
Morgan Thomas
Morgan Thomas
23 days ago

The Leyland P76 Force 7 Coupe may have the biggest ration of cars sold to owners manuals produced – 56 built, 10 sold (the rest were crushed). But over the years hundreds of owners manuals have popped up on eBay ads.

Last edited 23 days ago by Morgan Thomas
CUlater
CUlater
23 days ago

Family Truckster II and logging truck, anyone?

Col Lingus
Col Lingus
23 days ago

Hiding from the Tornado.

Amberturnsignalsarebetter
Amberturnsignalsarebetter
23 days ago

I think the market is ready for a cappuccino reboot – I’ll take a Suzuki double-shot espresso, please.

MaximillianMeen
MaximillianMeen
23 days ago

In the US, of course, we would get an Americano – a bigger, watered-down version.

Thomas Metcalf
Thomas Metcalf
23 days ago

I have been tempted to try to drive under a sprayer with my MGB. It would probably surprise the hell out of the sprayer driver.

Chemodalius
Chemodalius
23 days ago
Reply to  Thomas Metcalf

I got stuck behind one of them in my Miata recently. I’ve never come so close to letting the intrusive thoughts win.

Lizardman in a human suit
Lizardman in a human suit
23 days ago
Reply to  Chemodalius

Growing up in farm country, and getting stuck behind them a lot, I can tell you, the temptation was STRONG!

A. Barth
A. Barth
23 days ago

The second pic gave me a Spyhunter vibe. Instead of going into an 18-wheeler, the hero would drive his car under the high-wheeled support vehicle, which would then articulate some arms to pick up the Cappuccino and add the oil slick apparatus, caltrops, etc. before placing the car-of-coffee back on the road.

Collegiate Autodidact
Collegiate Autodidact
23 days ago

And if there aren’t any large industrial sprayers around but there are 18-wheeler trucks around you could emulate Mark “Skid” McCormick with his Coyote X (at about 0:32 in this video https://youtu.be/hPT6Y_kIj-Q?si=yeDEWBuK2fT2QKbZ) though when Hardcastle and McCormick was made most trucks didn’t have those aerodynamic fairings on the sides so such a maneuver might not be possible today, alas.

Elanosaurous
Elanosaurous
23 days ago

Morning of May 28, 2024:
All other automative websites: New hybrid 911!!!!!!!!!
The Autopian: Here’s a kei car underneath a giant tractor

MATTinMKE
MATTinMKE
23 days ago
Reply to  Elanosaurous

This is why I start my day here!

Canopysaurus
Canopysaurus
23 days ago

When you spend close to half a million dollars for a piece of farm equipment, the least they can do is throw in a free Cappuccino.

StillNotATony
StillNotATony
23 days ago

If you combined that sprayer with a house on stilts, you could survive a zombie apocalypse by simply being above it all.

V10omous
V10omous
23 days ago

Every single person who lives in a farm state has made this mental calculation at least once while stuck going 20 mph behind a sprayer.

Musicman27
Musicman27
23 days ago
Reply to  V10omous

now what would happen if one rolled into a Californian car show?

Drew
Drew
23 days ago
Reply to  V10omous

I’ve seen a couple videos with Viper steering wheels where the person behind the wheel was talking about intrusive thoughts and a LOT of comments saying that a Viper definitely fits. Can you confirm or deny that a Viper can make that maneuver?

V10omous
V10omous
23 days ago
Reply to  Drew

Height-wise there’d be no concern as the roof is barely taller than the Suzuki pictured.

I’d be pretty concerned with the width though; the Viper is as wide as a truck.

The only time I ever considered this in semi-seriousness is when I had my MR2 Spyder.

Drew
Drew
23 days ago
Reply to  V10omous

Yeah, I thought width might be pushing it. Probably at least lose a mirror to the ladder at the front, but you’d risk a lot worse.

MR2 would probably make it unscathed.

Frankencamry
Frankencamry
23 days ago
Reply to  Drew

That ladder is only there because it’s parked. It lifts out of the way in operation.

Probably would still be questionable on the Viper, but I’ve been under these in much larger vehicles than the Cappuccino. Many a joke about “spraying for bugs” was made with a picture taken with a VW Beetle under one.

Flyingstitch
Flyingstitch
23 days ago

I have thought so many times about doing that with a tiny car. Usually when I’m behind one of those beasts lumbering down the road.

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