Home » The 2025 Toyota Crown Signia Will Get The Job Done

The 2025 Toyota Crown Signia Will Get The Job Done

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The 2025 Toyota Crown Signia is part of a new era for the manufacturer. Gone are the Avalon sedans and Venza SUVs, and in their place is a single brand name: the Crown. The Crown is Toyota’s longest-running nameplate worldwide at roughly 70 years old, but to a lot of U.S. buyers, it’s new.

The Crown Signia doesn’t just demonstrate Toyota’s commitment to the Crown nameplate in America, it also continues to give us a look into our hybrid- and SUV-laden future.

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[Full disclosure: Toyota flew me out to San Diego to drive a bunch of cars on an off-road course and street routes. Toyota provided travel, accommodations, and food. I had a chocolate milkshake with sprinkles. -AK]

What Is the Crown Signia?

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The Toyota Crown brand will be a family of cars, kind of like how the Ford Mustang is now a muscle car and an electric SUV. In the Crown family, “Signia” is just a fancy way to say “SUV.” The Crown sedan came first, replacing the Avalon. Now, it’s time for the Crown Signia to take the Venza’s crown.

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Avalon Crown Venza
Out: Avalon and Venza. In: Crown sedan and Signia.

The Signia is the Crown family’s first SUV, featuring a 240-horsepower, hybrid-only powertrain and all-wheel drive on all models. Toyota describes the Signia as having a “long, sweeping roofline, monochromatic grille, and wide front and rear fenders,” which was enough to make a few auto journalists optimistically toss the term “wagon” around at the drive event.

2025 Toyota Crown Signia Limited Stormcloud 015
Toyota

Toyota only has only two available trims for the Crown Signia: the XLE (which starts at $43,590 base, plus fees) and Limited ($47,990 base, plus fees). Standard features include leather-trimmed seating, the Toyota Safety Sense 3.0 driver-assistance suite, a 12.3-inch infotainment touchscreen, a heated and telescoping steering wheel, and more. Toyota says the Signia can tow up to 2,700 pounds.

Toyota mentioned during a walkaround of the car that the higher base price and limited options are meant to make building and purchasing the car easier. If people have what they need and can drive off the lot without waiting for another car with a tiny spec-sheet difference, Toyota can move more cars and have fewer sitting around.

2025 Toyota Crown Signia Limited Stormcloud 334
Toyota

The Signia’s hybrid powertrain is not a plug-in, which means the car’s battery charges while it drives. While a plug-in hybrid like the RAV4 Prime gets 42 miles of electric-only range, the Signia’s EV mode is limited to low-speed driving — basically, if you’re gliding around a parking lot, you can do so solely electrically. If you accelerate much past that, the gas motor kicks on.

Like the new Toyota Camry, which is also hybrid-only, the Crown Signia’s all-wheel drive system sends power to the rear wheels through a dedicated rear electric motor, providing additional traction when you need it, while the electric motor-assisted gas engine powers the front wheels.

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Let’s look at the Crown Signia’s basic specs:

  • Price: $43,590 (XLE trim) and $47,990 (Limited trim) plus fees 
  • Engine: 2.5-liter four-cylinder 
  • Transmission: Electronically controlled continuously variable transmission (eCVT)
  • Drivetrain: Standard electronic on-demand all-wheel drive (AWD)
  • Horsepower: 240
  • Fuel Economy (mpg): Manufacturer-estimated 39 city, 37 highway, and 38 combined
  • Body Style: Five-seat crossover
  • Curb Weight: 4,210 pounds 

What It Looks Like

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The three most striking parts of the Crown Signia’s exterior, in my opinion, are the long roofline I mentioned earlier, the nose, and the headlights. The nose is different because it goes against the “make the grille as big as possible” trend we’ve seen for a long time now, instead wearing a body-colored nose panel with diamond-shaped holes.

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The headlights follow the Toyota lineup’s new “hammerhead” front end, where the hood lines, grill, and lights combine to look like a hammerhead shark. The lines blend elegantly and give the Toyota lineup a recognizable face, but I’m still not in love with that face yet.

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What About the Inside?

The Signia’s interior is pleasant but conservative; itdoes not take risks with interior design and materials choices like, say, modern Hyundais and Kias do. It’s livable but unmemorable in standard trim, but makes a stronger impression with the optional panoramic glass roof that makes the car feel spacious and airy inside.

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There’s also plenty of rear legroom. I’m 5-foot-8, and with the passenger seat scooted far back, I still had about 5 inches between it and my knee. The rear cargo space (24.8 square feet with the panoramic roof and 25.8 without) is massive – I could get my entire body inside and roll around.

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Rear passengers get USB-C charging ports and seat heaters, but they don’t have their own climate controls. Front passengers have wireless Apple CarPlay and a 12.3-inch screen, which is a nice size and easy to use.

2025 Toyota Crown Signia Limited Stormcloud 302
Toyota

I wish the buttons under the infotainment screen were fancier — they’re plasticky and dull — but I liked the two-tone caramel and black interior my Crown Signia had. It made the conservative styling more interesting, and the little bronze accents (like the dashboard trim and door handles) made the inside feel elegant.

How It Drives

The Signia drives like a nice commuter car, but it’s still a commuter car. There’s not a lot of wind noise at high speeds, and road noise varies. On less rough surfaces, the sound of the radio can easily cover the noise. On rougher ones, I noticed during my short drive some amount of drone.

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The engine also drones around 55 mph, and the car feels billowy at high speeds on tight, squiggly roads. It felt like a lot of weight transfer in the corners, a feeling that made me slow down for stability reasons. (I don’t think this is a terrible thing. As cars in general get more capable, I’d actually prefer people not drive faster than they’re capable of due to false confidence.)

2025 Toyota Crown Signia Limited Finishlinered 206
Toyota

The steering wasn’t too light or too heavy, and both the steering and pedals responded well to inputs. The pedals weren’t squishy or light; they had good tension without being heavy.

The most important part, though, is the hybrid system. Toyota is going all-in on hybrids, and while I think the company should make more fully electric models, hybrids are the perfect cars for current American infrastructure. They allow people to lightly transition to electrification — and get better fuel economy — without experiencing the range anxiety or general uncertainty they would with full EVs. That creates a lower barrier to entry for electrification, exposing more people to it and slowly moving us toward a more electric society.

A non-plug-in hybrid system like the Signia’s is even more friendly; buyers don’t have to change anything about their daily lives or relationship with their car in order to use it, yet they still get the benefits of hybrid driving and the limited EV-only mode.

Conclusion

Toyota Crown Sedan Toyota Crown Signia 003
Toyota

If Crown Signia shoppers have never driven or owned a hybrid or fully electric vehicle, the “hybrid-only” moniker might scare them at first. The terms “hybrid” and “EV” come with the connotation that the car owner has to do something new and different — plug the car in — but I think having volume-sellers like the Camry and Crown Signia offered as hybrid-only (note: The Venza was also Hybrid only) is a step forward for all of us.

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2025 Toyota Crown Signia Limited Finishlinered 100
Toyota

Popular hybrid-only models make gas-car buyers more comfortable with the future, and show them the benefits the electric future provides. I wrote more about that in my Camry review, so I won’t bore regular readers by saying it all again.

The Crown Signia does a lot of things right. It looks decent, drives well, has quality materials, and it continues to push our country as a whole to be more comfortable with electrified vehicles. Is it particularly exciting? No. But does it do the job, well and in style? Yes. That’s all most car buyers need, and it means this car will be a hit. At least, when compared to the Venza it replaces.

Second Opinion Split

I Also Drove The 2025 Toyota Crown Signia, And It Seems Promising

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Thomas Hundal here. I, too, have driven the new Toyota Crown Signia, and I have thoughts. Like the generous grandparents with kind smiles who gift their grandkids $100 bills every Christmas, or the first songbird you see as the calendar flips around to spring, its image can do no wrong. It’s supposed to be a moderately sumptuous two-row crossover for well-heeled yet grounded empty-nesters, and you know what? It does more than alright on that front.

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The 2.5-liter four-cylinder hybrid powertrain is plenty potent enough to keep up with traffic and indulge in the occasional overtaking maneuver. Suspension tuning, a hit-or-miss proposition on many mainline Toyotas, is effortlessly settled. Stereotypical Quebec pavement fails to perturb the chassis beyond the occasional hushed murmur making its way through the sound deadening, even as the cornfields start to blur.

Img 4900

In addition, the JBL premium audio system goes properly loud, there’s loads of space for people and their things, the centre console accommodates pack rats, wind noise is generally hushed, and the front turn signals just look sharp. In fact, the whole vehicle does. Add in the perfectly toasted caramel textiles wrapped around the door cards and dash trims, and you get a package that could tempt people away from the current Lexus RX because it just feels like a more thoughtful experience. This isn’t a Toyota Outback, it’s something else entirely.

Nits to pick? Sure. There are some on every car. If you like a low driving position and have long legs, the Crown Signia isn’t the car for you. Try as I might, I simply couldn’t get comfortable behind the wheel. In addition, the digital gauge cluster is rather busy, and the steering wheel-mounted controls for the stereo, cluster, and driving assist systems must’ve been arranged by Jackson Pollock. Thankfully, there’s still a volume knob, and that’s all you really need. Oh, and the panoramic moonroof doesn’t open despite being a two-panel design. Strange, that.

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Still, minor quibbles aside, the Toyota Crown Signia is the sort of car a small group of people have been craving for years. First-generation Venza owners will have a collective orgasm when they realize how thoroughly and utterly pleasant the Crown Signia is, and how it fulfills all of their wishes. It’s a handsome, well-crafted, surprisingly economical, utterly composed midsize hybrid crossover without any snob factor. It’s a nice thing that doesn’t lord its status as a nice thing over others.

Now, will the Toyota Crown Signia forge a strong presence among the crossover extravaganza that is the current Toyota lineup? While models like the RAV4, Highlander, Grand Highlander, and even the weird Crown sedan likely won’t see a ton of cannibalization, you can’t help but get a strong sense that Toyota will sell every Crown Signia it sends to North American dealerships. It’s a Toyota crossover, people will buy it regardless, but it helps to know that it’s on a mission to satisfy.

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Huja Shaw
Huja Shaw
1 month ago

 the Toyota Crown Signia is the sort of car a small group of people have been craving for years.

Small but over-indexes on the number of keystrokes pounded while commenting on car enthusiasts’ sites.

TheHairyNug
TheHairyNug
1 month ago

Japan gets an AWD PHEV Crown Sport. I would like one of those please

Scruffinater
Scruffinater
1 month ago
Reply to  TheHairyNug

Ditto

I Could but Meh
I Could but Meh
1 month ago
Reply to  TheHairyNug

Exactly. I don’t understand why they would bother making a non-plugin version.

Vic Vinegar
Vic Vinegar
1 month ago
Reply to  TheHairyNug

Problem is it would probably be $60k+ here the way Toyota prices the PHEVs. Probably too close to the RX plug in for this market.

TheHairyNug
TheHairyNug
1 month ago
Reply to  Vic Vinegar

I think it would be right around $60k. It has a higher base trim than something like the RAV4, so starting prime at ~$55k is possible. Not that $55k is exactly terribly cheap…

DialMforMiata
DialMforMiata
1 month ago

TIL that Toyota’s still making the Venza.

Red92svx
Red92svx
1 month ago
Reply to  DialMforMiata

The newer Venza looks way better (and has some nice premium touches) than the old Venza. Funny that a lot of the review for this car could apply to the newer Venza as well.

Taargus Taargus
Taargus Taargus
1 month ago

Seems like a decent semi-premium option for people wanting something a little less lame than the typical midsized crossover. I don’t hate it.

Anything that slowly brings down the height of the average vehicle is fine by me. It’s no wagon, but we’re getting closer.

Autopizen
Autopizen
1 month ago

Agreed, but as the roof line comes down, the belt line does not (I know: crash tests). Modern windows are starting to look like gun slits. Maybe intentionally.

Meanwhile the ridiculous grille design language Toyota refuses to abandon (at least they made it body colored) consumes too much of the front end.

Not my cuppa I guess.

Taargus Taargus
Taargus Taargus
1 month ago
Reply to  Autopizen

Yeah the new faces of these next generation Toyotas doesn’t do much for me either. And yes, I hate the Costanza-level shrinkage that afflicts modern windows. The vast amount of glass in my van and my wife’s Forester are some of our favorite features of those cars.

Autopizen
Autopizen
1 month ago

Totally agree. A van is good, the best greenhouses for their capacity.

Our old Forester & Fit have great greenhouses. Plus the Forester has a huge glass roof.

Taargus Taargus
Taargus Taargus
1 month ago
Reply to  Autopizen

We went for the base instead of the premium. The premium was in retrospect an incredible deal for the equipment you got including the panoramic sunroof.

Church
Church
1 month ago

chocolate milkshake with sprinkles

Pics next time, yeesh.

Der Foo
Der Foo
1 month ago

Is there still going to be a Hybrid Max system?

I’m not seeing information on it in the latest reviews. Not sure how much the Max system costs, but if Toyota stays the course for configuration, it will only be in the top trim with a premium price hike.

TheHairyNug
TheHairyNug
1 month ago
Reply to  Der Foo

No. This uses the last gen hybrid tech from Toyota. I really, really doubt that they’ll integrate a whole new generation power train into it

Der Foo
Der Foo
1 month ago
Reply to  TheHairyNug

The current Crown sedan has it. Not sure why it wouldn’t be offered outside of a business decision around balancing out offerings to maximize profits.

TheHairyNug
TheHairyNug
1 month ago
Reply to  Der Foo

Throttle House is saying there are no plans

Last edited 1 month ago by TheHairyNug
Der Foo
Der Foo
1 month ago
Reply to  TheHairyNug

Oh well. The sedan with Max is too expensive for me anyway and if the Signia had it, same.

Last edited 1 month ago by Der Foo
Mr. Fusion
Mr. Fusion
1 month ago
Reply to  TheHairyNug

As far as I know, it is the current-gen hybrid system, just not the Hybrid Max. Toyota has two powertrains in what they call the “5th generation” hybrid system, the one seen in the new, more powerful Prius (and this Venza, as far as I know), and the Hybrid Max, seen in the Crown Sedan and Grand Highlander.

Anyway, I agree that it is a massive mistake for Toyota to not offer the Max version in this car.

TheHairyNug
TheHairyNug
1 month ago
Reply to  Mr. Fusion

Throttle House is usually pretty accurate with their facts despite also being wildly entertaining. I’m just going off of what they said in their new video

Timbales
Timbales
1 month ago

it looks like a larger Corolla Cross with a more modern front end.

Parsko
Parsko
1 month ago

How is this not a wagon????

And, yes, I want one. Also agree it should also option as a PHEV. The Crown (in any form) is on my short list right now.

Der Foo
Der Foo
1 month ago
Reply to  Parsko

“Wagon” doesn’t sell. “SUV” is copacetic.

E.g. The Subaru Outback is categorized as an SUV on pretty much every site. IRL, it checks more boxes as a wagon than an SUV. The point that carries a inordinate amount of weight is that it is ‘lifted’. If the Volvo V60 Cross Country was a few inches higher, it to would be an SUV.

The Crown suffers from looking, in many ways, similar to GM’s Blazer et al, which is an SUV (b/c it’s name is from a SUV and GM says its an SUV). Thus, the Crown without a trunk is an SUV. The Crown with a trunk is a sedan. You change one will thing and it is something else entirely.

Just my take on it.

Last edited 1 month ago by Der Foo
Parsko
Parsko
1 month ago
Reply to  Der Foo

I guess we both agree this is a wagon then? It seems tall to me, but still a wagon.

Mr. Fusion
Mr. Fusion
1 month ago
Reply to  Der Foo

The Outback is a little bit taller than the Volvo V60 Cross Country. The V60CC is my ideal height — not lifted as high as an SUV, and not rubbing the ground like most sedans. My 500L was also at that perfect height.

Andrew Martin
Andrew Martin
1 month ago
Reply to  Parsko

To my eyes, it’s a wagon – which is awesome!

Carbon Fiber Sasquatch
Carbon Fiber Sasquatch
1 month ago

If I was looking for a family hauler, this would be top of my list. No, it’s not exciting but it’s the right shape, power and mpg to have as the dedicated family car. It’s a Toyota so it will run for years with just standard maintenance. This is the ultimate non-car enthusiast car.

NephewOfBaconator
NephewOfBaconator
1 month ago

In what way would it be a better family car than the Highlander it shares so much with? They both have the same 112.2″ wheelbase, and the Highlander is available with the same powertrain if you like the hybrid. But the Highlander gives you the flexibility of a small third row in the event you need to cram in some extra kids, or with it folded down you have more cargo space than the Crown Signia. And the Highlander’s second row can both recline and slide forward/aft as necessary where I believe the Crown Signia’s second row appears fixed. Also in the press images it doesn’t look like the Crown Signia has rear HVAC controls, which the Highlander has. The Crown Signia has more style but the Highlander seems like a better family car.

Carbon Fiber Sasquatch
Carbon Fiber Sasquatch
1 month ago

See, I think the Highlander is the odd man out in this discussion, the middle option that doesn’t quite make sense. If you need a third row, the Grand Highlander or Sienna does a better job of that and comes in hybrid too.

I see this as a slightly larger Camry wagon, you still only need two rows but need more space for Brayden’s La Crosse gear. I know it’s a “crossover” but that’s marketing. This is the upgrade from the Camry without going to Lexus

Davey
Davey
1 month ago

My thoughts exactly. As a previous Camry wagon owner the only thing I would have changed was slightly higher ground clearance for camping and winters. Mission accomplished.

Carbon Fiber Sasquatch
Carbon Fiber Sasquatch
1 month ago
Reply to  Davey

Right? It’s just twin rear window wipers away for me from being amazing

R53forfun
R53forfun
1 month ago

I was one of the dozens of us looking forward to Alanis’ review of this rig.
I’ve got mad respect for Alanis.
Unfortunately for me, though, her lack of enthusiasm about the vehicle is both hilarious and palpable. That headline for starters lol.

Thanks to Thomas for trying to put a more positive spin but I’ll consider my expectations tempered ahead of actually seeing one IRL and forming my own opinions.

Last edited 1 month ago by R53forfun
BenCars
BenCars
1 month ago

I like how the header picture includes “WITH ALANIS KING” like a show crediting a superstar (which she is, admittedly).

Nick Thomas
Nick Thomas
1 month ago

I would have found this compelling if it came in PHEV form. I like the styling on this way better than the Rav4 prime. But really want a PHEV for my next car.

The 2025 Mazda CX-50 is supposed to come with a Toyota-made hybrid system (and maybe even the RAV4 PHEV system? I forget the exact details). This I’m so-so on. But a car with Toyota reliability and Mazda styling and driving dynamics? Count me in.

TheDrunkenWrench
TheDrunkenWrench
1 month ago

While I am definitely not the market for this thing, I have to say that my fellow Canadian really has the best literary descriptions in vehicle reviews. Even mundane family haulers are interesting to read about through your eyes, Thomas.

Also, why is there no clip of Alanis doing her token trunk test?

Frankencamry
Frankencamry
1 month ago

“Videos of girls being put in car trunks” is a special membership level. You get a pretty interesting drawing from Torch, too.

TheDrunkenWrench
TheDrunkenWrench
1 month ago
Reply to  Frankencamry

That seems like a google search that ends up with you on watchlists. I’ll stick to the written reviews.

Mr. Fusion
Mr. Fusion
1 month ago

Wait, so which came first, Alanis’ trunk tours, or Alex on Autos’ Trunk Comfort Index? (Which he sadly does not do anymore.)

TheDrunkenWrench
TheDrunkenWrench
1 month ago
Reply to  Mr. Fusion

As I don’t know who the latter is, I don’t have an answer.

Vic Vinegar
Vic Vinegar
1 month ago

Well this is underwhelming. I say that as someone who was fired up for the idea of a Crown wagon (although not really a “wagon” I guess).

I can’t say this enough, but enough with the piano black trim. I guess this is better than the useless black trim piece on the doors of the Crown that assure I’d only consider buying one in black, but it still isn’t good.

The brown interior is a plus. Toyota seems to keep those to as few cars as possible, when brown is a superior color. Bonus of they offer the Crown’s excellent looking cloth.

I don’t get the limited functionality sunroof. I want a sunroof in my next car, I miss having one, but it is so I can open the roof. If it can’t do that…not sure why it is there.

I guess I’d have to drive one to see if the materials, comfort level is worth the scratch. Otherwise, I am wondering why I don’t spend my $45k on a RAV4 Prime that appears to be similar enough in size.

And when listing the price of a Toyota, be sure to add the pile of port installed junk that seemingly every Toyota is saddled with these days. $2k worth of floor mats, “door edge guards”, USB cables and wheel locks. All the stuff that used to collect dust in the dealer parts department is now apparently installed by Toyota on the sticker.

Never mind if you are shopping in the Southeast and get to swallow the extra $1k in BS Southeast Toyota adds to each car. Or my local dealer that claims to sell at MSRP but adds $1500 for an “appearance protection package” and window tints. Guess who I don’t want doing my window tint? Whoever the car dealer hires to do it.

Brandon Forbes
Brandon Forbes
1 month ago
Reply to  Vic Vinegar

Dimensions have this nearly identical to a V90, Toyota may not admit it, but this is a wagon.

IRegertNothing, Esq.
IRegertNothing, Esq.
1 month ago
Reply to  Brandon Forbes

Wagons are low key coming back as the in-between option. My parents’ Niro is about 2 inches taller than their Accord and barely has more ground clearance. They classify it as a crossover and even threw on a little cladding for good measure, but come on. That’s a wagon.

Brandon Forbes
Brandon Forbes
1 month ago

I’ve always looked at the niro as more of a hatchback. It’s very similarly sized to a golf I think, it might be bigger but they look very close to me.

IRegertNothing, Esq.
IRegertNothing, Esq.
1 month ago
Reply to  Brandon Forbes

The rear door is more upright than what you see on a modern hatchback, but it’s not like an old school longroof wagon where you can fold the rear seats and load up 8 foot long materials without going between the front seats. I don’t think those will ever make a comeback sadly.

Last edited 1 month ago by IRegertNothing, Esq.
Brandon Forbes
Brandon Forbes
1 month ago

Fair. I forgot there was a second gen Niro, the first gen is the only one I have ever examined up close.

Autopizen
Autopizen
1 month ago

Love the usrenaem.

Thevenin
Thevenin
1 month ago
Reply to  Brandon Forbes

V90: 195″L × 75″W × 58″T
Signia: 194″L × 74″W × 64″T (based on prototype)

Same footprint, but 6″ taller. It’s a much closer match to the Honda Prologue, Blazer EV, and (to a lesser degree) Polestar 3… are we calling those wagons, too?

(Edit: genuinely asking, not a rhetorical question)

Last edited 1 month ago by Thevenin
Brandon Forbes
Brandon Forbes
1 month ago
Reply to  Thevenin

Oh that’s my bad, I googled dimensions for the Crown Signia and didn’t notice it was listing the specs for the normal Crown at 61″, the V90 is showing up as 61 as well for me so I thought it was basically identical. That’s unfortunate, I really like the idea of a cheaper V90, but if it’s as tall as every other crossover then yeah I am not really interested. No, I do not call any of the others you listed wagons.

Andreas8088
Andreas8088
1 month ago
Reply to  Vic Vinegar

I can’t say this enough, but enough with the piano black trim.

Completely agree. It just makes things look cheap and chintzy. Plus it scratches like mad.

Huja Shaw
Huja Shaw
1 month ago
Reply to  Vic Vinegar

This is like the wagon-equivalent of a speakeasy. You have to know the location, secret knock and publicly say your testing out an SUV.

Cerberus
Cerberus
1 month ago
Reply to  Vic Vinegar

Don’t understand the point of a non-opening glass roof, either. Cool, extra solar gain and weight!

Andy Individual
Andy Individual
1 month ago
Reply to  Vic Vinegar

The glass roof is to appease the climate deniers. “No, we definitely aren’t experiencing more hail storms these days”.

Mr. Fusion
Mr. Fusion
1 month ago
Reply to  Vic Vinegar

That RAV4 would definitely be more cramped inside than this.

NephewOfBaconator
NephewOfBaconator
1 month ago

I know it’s cliche to point out the huge selection of CUV/SUVs that Toyota sells, but I just wonder where this fits in. Like, when the Toyota salesperson sees someone come in and they’re deciding what car to show them?

If it’s a guy wearing Carhartt, show them the 4Runner
If it’s a guy wearing Patagonia, show them the Land Cruiser
If it’s a young person who looks like they don’t have a lot of money, show them the Corolla Cross
If it’s a nerd wearing a NASA shirt, show them the bZ4X
If it’s a family with a kid or two, show them the Highlander
If it’s a family with 3 kids, show them the Grand Highlander
If it’s a family with 3 kids and Dad is wearing Patagonia, show them the Sequoia
If you’re not sure, just default to showing them the RAV4

So, who are we showing the Crown Signia to? Relatively meager cargo space makes me feel like this isn’t a family-focused vehicle. I guess it’s leaning on style, so maybe couples who want something stylish, but they want to save a few bucks compared to a Lexus RX? Seems like a pretty small niche.

JKcycletramp
JKcycletramp
1 month ago

The Crown Signia is for couples that arrive wearing Banana Republic and brought their corgi along.

IRegertNothing, Esq.
IRegertNothing, Esq.
1 month ago

If they show up wearing personalized cufflinks, tell them the Lexus dealership is across the street.

Tim R
Tim R
1 month ago

We would be in the target audience for this. Recent empty nesters with an aging Highlander. But I don’t think it quite does it for us. A non-opening sunroof is just stupid and a dealbreaker. Interior is nice but I’d want/expect Avalon-level quietness on the road if you’re not going to make the drive exciting.

Huja Shaw
Huja Shaw
1 month ago

So, who are we showing the Crown Signia to? 

DINKS who want something more refined than an Outback and don’t want to fuss with the reliability of a Euro wagon.

Grey alien in a beige sedan
Grey alien in a beige sedan
1 month ago

The big miss here is that they are still using the upside down sombrero instead of the JDM Crown badges. WTF?!? Whoever in their marketing department made that decision needs fired, STAT!

Next we need at least a TRD trim that lowers and tightens up the suspension and adds a ground effect package. Then, we need the real deal – a GR variant with the real go fast bits added. We’ve already got a rather large engine, just throw a couple of turbos on it and make this a wagon with some panache and some actual curb appeal. Also, I want 17″ wheels on the GR because I’ll go through a bunch of tires and this size is almost affordable.

If they made a GR variant, I’d gladly give them every penny I work for to have it. Also, because I’m a crotchety old, grown-ass man, I’d get a hello kitty wrap on it – just because. That’s how you Toyota my friends.

Last edited 1 month ago by Grey alien in a beige sedan
Brandon Forbes
Brandon Forbes
1 month ago

I do not think I have ever agreed with a comment this wholeheartedly. Yes. A million times YES! I had an imported 90s Crown and loved the emblems on it! It still had the sombrero on the back, but crowns on the front and on each D pillar and it was so awesome. I loved those and feel like there has to be an easy retrofit for these.

A TRD would be fun, I don’t need a full on GR, a hot wagon is more than I need, but a warm wagon would be amazing. Or actually, a Prime version that is a PHEV with extra power and an all electric range would be great too! 240 hp isn’t bad, but up that to a 300 and let me get 50 miles without the engine and I am sold! A GR variant would be interesting, going toe to toe with Volvo R wagons or even aiming for an AMG E wagon, I see that being too far out of my price range though.

Brandon Forbes
Brandon Forbes
1 month ago
Reply to  Brandon Forbes

Actually, it doesn’t even need TRD or GR badges, there already is a 340hp crown sedan, just offer that powertrain here. Weird that they wouldn’t. I still want a Prime more than that though honestly.

Tbird
Tbird
1 month ago

Agree, I’m probably the target market for this (late 40’s empty nester) and would consider buying one. Always liked wagons and my current Toyota hybrid ownership experience has been stellar. A wagon that gets the same economy as my Camry with an upgraded and more lux interior? I’m in.

Squirrelmaster
Squirrelmaster
1 month ago

It is certainly a much better looking vehicle than the Venza it is replacing, but the starting price is simply too high for what it is – a problem the regular Crown has as well. At least in my area, this won’t be a big seller unless they offer discounts to tempt people away from cheaper competitors.

V10omous
V10omous
1 month ago
Reply to  Squirrelmaster

I thought this as well until I sat in one.

The materials quality is simply better than most of Toyota’s (or other mainstream brands’) regular offerings.

It’s possible it will still be a slow seller if people don’t recognize the value, but a reliable 40 mpg crossover with Lexus-grade furnishings doesn’t seem out of place at $45-50K.

Squirrelmaster
Squirrelmaster
1 month ago
Reply to  V10omous

When my family was car shopping earlier this year to replace our minivan (which we decided to keep for a few more years), we spoke with the Toyota sales folks who expressed that while they thought the Crown sedan would be a big seller because AWD, it isn’t. They said the price has been a huge problem, and also said they doubt the “Crown SUV” Toyota had shown them would steal any sales from the RAV4 hybrid or Prime, but rather the opposite. I’m with you on Lexus quality at a lower price being a selling point, but I’ve only seen two Crown sedans in the wild, so it doesn’t seem compelling enough for those voting with their wallets.

V10omous
V10omous
1 month ago
Reply to  Squirrelmaster

I think the Crown sedan looks weird enough to turn people off before they even see the interior. This is an inoffensive looking CUV, if it can’t sell then something really is wrong with the price/value.

Squirrelmaster
Squirrelmaster
1 month ago
Reply to  V10omous

Yeah, I’m with you. I think the article is correct that existing Venza owners will probably love it, but the question now is if it will get non-Venza owners to love it too and convert them from their Outbacks, Pilots, CR-Vs, and Highlanders.

J Hyman
J Hyman
1 month ago
Reply to  V10omous

So much this. The random black inserts all over the sedan exterior manage to outdo the last gen Civic in tastelessness, no mean feat.

V10omous
V10omous
1 month ago
Reply to  J Hyman

That is why my dad bought his in black

TDI in PNW
TDI in PNW
1 month ago

(yells at cloud) To me, SUVs are like trucks and minivans; I find them useful but I really don’t want to daily an SUV, no matter how nice. I don’t like the sense of being up high, dragging a room behind me. I’m sure the Crown Signia is a fine vehicle that I’d totally borrow from a friend/relative.

Mr. Fusion
Mr. Fusion
1 month ago
Reply to  TDI in PNW

Fortunately for you, this is a wagon!

Nathan Hartley
Nathan Hartley
1 month ago

My wife just got a Toyota Highlander Hybrid as a company car. The Crown Signia sounds very similar, just minus the foldable (useless) 3rd row in the Highlander.

However for both of these to be a “Crown” there isn’t much of a connecting visual feature between them.

Michael Beranek
Michael Beranek
1 month ago

If you like a low driving position and have long legs, the Crown Signia isn’t the car for you.”
I was going to forward this review to my wife… until I read this. It almost looks like a real car.

Nsane In The MembraNe
Nsane In The MembraNe
1 month ago

I love the way the Signia looks and love them on paper…but man, the packaging is a real disappointment. These have less cargo space with the rear seats up than a RAV4 and they’re about as long as a Highlander. The wife and I were eager to look at one for her, but this is too small on the inside for family duty.

I remain perplexed by how manufacturers continue to somehow make cars that are bigger and heavier but smaller on the inside. This is probably a car best served as a daily for empty nesters who’ve gotten used to the form factor of an SUV. If you actually need space just get the Highlander…

Brandon Forbes
Brandon Forbes
1 month ago

I mean that’s pretty typical for a wagon vs a crossover. The cargo space here is comparable to a Volvo V90 which I feel like is more the class it fits in. The V90 is similarly about the same length as a Highlander, but much lower. I would much rather have this or the Volvo than a Highlander because I don’t want something that tall, I like lower cars and the Signia is 61″ tall vs the Highlanders 68. I like wagons and would pick a wagon over SUV/Crossover every time.

Nsane In The MembraNe
Nsane In The MembraNe
1 month ago
Reply to  Brandon Forbes

I mean I’d rather have a wagon too but I’m not going to be able to sell my wife on one, unfortunately

Brandon Forbes
Brandon Forbes
1 month ago

You say that, but then complain that a wagon has less space than a crossover haha. My point is that your initial comment was comparing apples to oranges as this is more of a wagon than the cars you were comparing it against.

Tbird
Tbird
1 month ago
Reply to  Brandon Forbes

Wagons always sacrifice cargo height over SUV’s. Dad’s old Colony Park could handle any length object, but was vertically limited. My current 2005 MDX is pretty well rounded in terms on capacity with good length and height. Minivans are truly the best overall for hauling.

Carbon Fiber Sasquatch
Carbon Fiber Sasquatch
1 month ago

I’d wait to see the cargo area in person. The way cargo is measured favors tall crossovers but they don’t often have it as usable as wagons do. I have a feeling that these have a huge trunk, especially since Alanis said she could roll around in it

Frankencamry
Frankencamry
1 month ago

As others have noted, listed cargo space and usable cargo space are different.

On a recent vacation our “large” rental vehicle was a Honda HR-V. On paper it has 24.4 cubic ft of cargo space with the seats up. My wife’s Accord that we took to the airport has 16.7. The Accord fit all our luggage in the trunk without incident, as the larger suitcases could lay flat. The HR-V was a complete failure that had them stack nearly to the ceiling and made the rearview mirror useless. We had to immediately reconfigure them to put smaller bags on the bottom so they wouldn’t slide off in a fast stop and land on a child.

It mostly reinforced that people by and large buy horrible vehicles with claims of “utility.”

Nsane In The MembraNe
Nsane In The MembraNe
1 month ago
Reply to  Frankencamry

Leave it to this commentariat to keep
me wagonpilled!

Cerberus
Cerberus
1 month ago

The problem with cargo volume numbers is that it doesn’t address how the cargo space is setup. My mk1 Legacy wagon had a ton of cargo space that was far more useful in the real world than its number on paper would imply as it was horizontal space. A lot of the S/CUVs have disappointing utility in terms of cargo space vs volume on paper because it’s more vertically oriented, which is harder to utilize (and to do so safely as anything stacked higher than the seats is a potential missile).

V10omous
V10omous
1 month ago

My dad just bought a Crown sedan last week and the thing that really stood out was just how nice the materials are inside. Comparing to my Sienna (also a fancy Limited trim), there’s much softer leather, much less plastic, tighter panel gaps, and generally a more premium feel.

This SUV does away with the somewhat awkward styling of the sedan, and if people compare side by side with Rav4, Highlander, etc, I think they’ll be pretty impressed.

BolognaBurrito
BolognaBurrito
1 month ago
Reply to  V10omous

What year is the Sienna?

V10omous
V10omous
1 month ago
Reply to  BolognaBurrito

2020, so the last year of the previous generation.

I haven’t spent extensive time in the current generation vans.

Taargus Taargus
Taargus Taargus
1 month ago
Reply to  V10omous

I think this has a chance to pull a lot of people from the regular Highlander by providing everything a small family wants in 2024, without being quite so bulky, ungainly, etc. When the primary driver checks out the interior and realizes that it roughly costs the same as a Highlander…

Mrbrown89
Mrbrown89
1 month ago

I got a 2024 Prius as a rental and I see the same steering wheel controls, on the week I had the car, I never got used to know what I was pressing, too many options in a weird arrangement.

Volume and changing songs should always be on the back of the steering wheel; cruise control, phone calls and screen options at the front and that’s about it.

BolognaBurrito
BolognaBurrito
1 month ago
Reply to  Mrbrown89

I hate almost any controls on the back of the steering wheel. Paddle shifters are the exception and hence the “almost”.

That being said, there should only be like 6 controls on the steering wheel (ignoring horn). Volume up, volume down, song/station backward, song/station forward, phone button (which should double as a hang-up button). Boom, that’s it. So actually just five.

Cruise control should be VW’s old system with the stalk; it was the best cruise control design that I’ve ever used and it didn’t result in 8 million buttons on the steering wheel. I don’t want lane assist or any of that shit, so I don’t need buttons for it on the steering wheel. Everything else I should be able to do through the console infotainment.

Last edited 1 month ago by BolognaBurrito
Musicman27
Musicman27
1 month ago
Reply to  BolognaBurrito

A 1st Gen Toyota Sequoia (2006 at least) had a Stalk Cruise control too.

Frankencamry
Frankencamry
1 month ago
Reply to  BolognaBurrito

Are you talking about VW’s stalk with the fiddly little switch on top for on/cancel/off? I currently have that system and had Toyota’s stalk on my old Camry. The VW system is a steaming pile of dog shit in comparison.

BolognaBurrito
BolognaBurrito
1 month ago
Reply to  Frankencamry

Yes. I never touched the damn on/cancel/off switch. Just tap the brakes to cancel and leave it on all the time. Tap the + for 1mph speed gain, hold it for a second for 5mph. It was fantastic.

Frankencamry
Frankencamry
1 month ago
Reply to  BolognaBurrito

Eww. Who wants to tap the brakes to cancel cruise control when every worthwhile system can do it by hand in a much smoother manner?

Clearly we are very different people.

BolognaBurrito
BolognaBurrito
1 month ago
Reply to  Frankencamry

When I say tapping the brakes, I don’t mean actually hard enough to engage them.

Michael Beranek
Michael Beranek
1 month ago
Reply to  Mrbrown89

Volume and changing songs should always be on the back of the steering wheel; cruise control, phone calls and screen options at the front and that’s about it.
FIFY.

Tbird
Tbird
1 month ago
Reply to  Mrbrown89

The old Toyota cruise control dongle is best – I will die on this hill. Once you learn it you never need to look at it and it is fully intuitive by touch.

BolognaBurrito
BolognaBurrito
1 month ago

The shifter looks like an uncooked cow tongue.

That is all.

StillNotATony
StillNotATony
1 month ago
Reply to  BolognaBurrito

I had to scroll up and look. You’re not wrong.

Musicman27
Musicman27
1 month ago
Reply to  StillNotATony

Holy crap your right!

Urban Runabout
Urban Runabout
1 month ago
Reply to  BolognaBurrito

Moo.

DaChicken
DaChicken
1 month ago
Reply to  BolognaBurrito

I won’t be unseeing that anytime soon.

Mr. Frick
Mr. Frick
1 month ago

Glad to know I can boast about spending 50K to help me lightly transition to electrification

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