Home » This Aston Martin V12-Swapped Range Rover Can Get Absolutely None More British

This Aston Martin V12-Swapped Range Rover Can Get Absolutely None More British

V12 Range Rover Ts
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How do you make an original Range Rover even more British? I mean sure, you could colonize the world with it, but that’s generally frowned upon these days and takes an awful lot of effort. Instead, why not replace the Rover V8 with something a bit more special, like an Aston Martin V12? Well, that’s exactly what’s happened here, and while the visual treatment is a bit over-the-top, the effects of this swap are sure to be profound.

This creation’s been built by Range Rover specialists Bishops 4×4 out of Peterborough, an outfit with a history of taking these iconic off-roaders, stripping them down to bare shells, and building them up better than new. The auction listing claims this unit took the firm two-and-a-half years to complete, and it’s easy to see why.

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However, Bishops 4×4 isn’t holding onto this V12-swapped Range Rover. It’s being auctioned off by Iconic Auctioneers on May 18, and one lucky bidder should be going home with an astonishingly potent classic Range Rover. Let’s take a closer look, shall we?

Aston Martin V12 in Range Rover

Under the hood of this British off-roader beats the heart of a DB7 V12. Why that engine? Well, not only is it a reasonably priced V12 engine, it also puts out some proper kick. We’re talking 5.9 liters of displacement and 420 horsepower in a package that just wouldn’t fit in a stock Range Rover Classic engine bay. Hey, that’s what cutting and welding is for. As per the listing:

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The front portion of the chassis rails had to have cut-out sections put into them before re-welding with strengthening bars to compensate for the narrower rails. Due to the size of the V12, a significant proportion of the engine needed to sit under/through the scuttle in order to fit, which meant measuring, cutting and re-welding for weeks on end, with an emphasis on precision and tidiness, striving for a factory-like finish.

While that’s extensive surgery, it’s worth noting that the original Range Rover featured body-on-frame construction, which means the firewall and cowling can be modified without touching the actual frame. Although the front chassis leg alterations might have an impact on safety, given that the Mk1 Range Rover was engineered in the 1960s, the chances of modifications making crashworthiness substantially worse seems slim.

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Besides, measures are in place to aid the keen driver in not hitting anything in the first place. We’re talking six-piston AP Racing monoblock front brake calipers clamping down on 14.25-inch discs, along with 285/65R18 Toyo Proxes tires. That ought to add modern stopping power and grip, and mechanical awareness is equally modern. A digital dashboard lets the driver flip between Range Rover-aping layout in the standard drive mode and a skeuomorphic Aston Martin gauge pack in sport mode. Plus, there’s a four-speed automatic transmission on tap to quash any temptation of ill-advised clutch kicks. See? It’s safe-ish.

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Despite the digital dashboard and Aston Martin crystal start button, the cabin of this swapped Range Rover looks pretty much period, with a sharp-looking retrim in lovely brown leather, matching carpets, and a woodgrain dashboard. From the inside, it hasn’t lost any of its elegance, a key part of this SUV’s appeal.

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Aston Martin V12 Range Rover

While the British bulldog theme with the chrome mascot and waving flag paintwork isn’t to everyone’s tastes, you have to admit, this is a pretty cool Range Rover. Plus, with an auction estimate of £30,000 to £40,000, it’s far cheaper than a new one. The 5.9-liter Aston Martin V12 makes a brilliant noise, and to have that coming out the back of a Range Rover, well, that might be even better than the supercharged V8 ruckus of the old Range Rover Sport SVR. Anyone up for a soundcheck?

(Photo credits: Iconic Auctioneers)

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James Carson
James Carson
22 days ago

Does it come with a riding mechanic?

Matti Sillanpää
Matti Sillanpää
22 days ago

The paint is way too much. Not that the whole build is the epitome of elegance, so I guess it fits. And I’m a fan of RRC:s (own ’86).

Bizness Comma Nunya
Bizness Comma Nunya
23 days ago

Kind of a (more?) modern Jerrari!

I don’t care how dumb it is…. I love it for it’s craziness.

CTSVmkeLS6
CTSVmkeLS6
23 days ago

Maybe the pics are not doing it justice but this thing looks like an English version of a redneck K5 Blazer here in the states.

JDE
JDE
23 days ago
Reply to  CTSVmkeLS6

we would have used a larger displacement V8. I am sure the old 6.75 liter Rolls Royce v8’s are cheap by now and American transmissions bolt up, so New Process probably makes an adapter for a decent Low first gear trans and Alta 2 t-case.

CTSVmkeLS6
CTSVmkeLS6
23 days ago
Reply to  JDE

Ahh yeah, the turbo 400 was used for a long time. Now we’re cookin!

Lockleaf
Lockleaf
23 days ago

I wouldn’t blink if that was a ’72 Blazer with Old Glory emblazoned across the front end. Yet somehow, it just feels odd to see it done with a British flag. Counter-counterpoint, somehow its also just fine to put the Union Jack on the roof of a mini cooper.

Jj
Jj
23 days ago

“with an emphasis on precision and tidiness, striving for a factory-like finish”

Aim higher, guys.

Amberturnsignalsarebetter
Amberturnsignalsarebetter
23 days ago
Reply to  Jj

Damn you Jj, now I have coffee all over my keyboard.

Jj
Jj
23 days ago

Are you using a Lucas keyboard?

Alpine 911
Alpine 911
23 days ago
Reply to  Jj

QotD

Vetatur Fumare
Vetatur Fumare
23 days ago

Q-plates are usually for kit cars, aren’t they? Any Brits here with opinions?

Phuzz
Phuzz
23 days ago
Reply to  Vetatur Fumare

They are for kit cars, and also for vehicles “whose age or identity is in doubt.”, which can include modified cars, ex-military vehicles etc. It used to be that people would do their best to keep a standard numberplate (usually from whichever vehicle contributed the largest parts to a kit car, such as the engine), but it seems like it’s an option to request a Q plate, and as they’re pretty rare now* I can see that people might now find them desirable.

(*Registration numbers starting with a letter stopped in 2001, now we have the form AA00BBB)

Art of the Bodge
Art of the Bodge
23 days ago
Reply to  Vetatur Fumare

It’s likely that enough parts have been changed or modified that the DVLA doesn’t consider it to be the original vehicle any more. There’s points assigned to keeping the original (or standard replacement parts) and if it’s less than 8 then it can’t use the original plate. Info here: https://www.gov.uk/vehicle-registration/radically-altered-vehicles

BigRed91
BigRed91
23 days ago

They could’ve gotten at least 50% more for this if they skipped the hideous paint job and kept it green like every other Range Rover from this generation.

Captain Muppet
Captain Muppet
23 days ago

None more British? Not until it hates itself.

Greg
Greg
23 days ago

Now you can tip over at high speed! That outside is woof! Inside is nice as you stated.

I just don’t understand this one, and I am someone who can get behind stuff like this usually. I wouldn’t even want it for free, the amount to get it un-uglied would be equal to the cost of purchase.

MEK
MEK
23 days ago

I’ve never seen that quad headlamp arrangement before. Is that an ‘over the pond’ only thing?

Also, they worked on it for 2-3 years and it’s only going to 30-40k pounds? Not much of a ROI on this one, is there?

Also, also, that flag motif is friggin hideous. Is there such thig as a Redneck Limey?

Gilbert Wham
Gilbert Wham
23 days ago
Reply to  MEK

Kind of, yeah. We call them Gammons. Not quite the same except for the flag thing and the conservatism. But yeah. That thing needs a respray, stat.

Usernametaken
Usernametaken
23 days ago

This vehicle is the ultimate pedestal on which to display the reliability of the MAN medium duty flat deck tow truck

Jack Trade
Jack Trade
23 days ago

That flag makes it seem more American, not British. British would be a small Union Jack decal on the sides maybe, which even then would make some buyers uneasy.

Arch Duke Maxyenko
Arch Duke Maxyenko
23 days ago

Mmmm warm air intakes

Alexk98
Alexk98
23 days ago

Warm air intake for Warm beer-drinking brits!

Captain Muppet
Captain Muppet
23 days ago
Reply to  Alexk98

We don’t drink warm beer. I don’t even know where you’d get warm beer, unless you bought a cold one and left it outside on one of the eight days a year the weather is warm.

There is much to mock the British for (or, let’s be honest, it’s the English you’re mocking, the Scots, Welsh and Northern Irish are basically fine), but not the temperature of the beer.

MaximillianMeen
MaximillianMeen
23 days ago
Reply to  Captain Muppet

I think the warm beer trope comes from cask ales that are kept at cellar temp rather than refrigerated.

That said, cask ales are friggin glorious! Some of the best beer I’ve ever had, and I have had quite a few in my life.

V10omous
V10omous
23 days ago

Lol isn’t that V12 two Duratec Ford Taurus engines glued together?

I know when I think British, I think jellybean Taurus.

Taco Shackleford
Taco Shackleford
23 days ago
Reply to  V10omous

The Brits would prefer you say it was pasted together. It sounds more proper that way.

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