Home » What Tools Do You Wish You’d Purchased Earlier In Life?

What Tools Do You Wish You’d Purchased Earlier In Life?

Ww David Impact Ts
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Manuel Verissimo
Manuel Verissimo
29 days ago

Rolling tool chest.

That’s a god dang game changer. No more lost tools, no more walking miles in the shop looking for that specific tool you need once a year, no more lost bolts that you just throw about.

Get one.

Last edited 29 days ago by Manuel Verissimo
Rockymountainhigh
Rockymountainhigh
1 month ago

Could be auto related one day. I’ve rented the augers from Home Depot and they never work for post holes, especially if your terrain is in CO and rocky like my backyard… I’ve bought several pair of “post hole diggers – clam style” and those blow.

I finally bought a 69″ Husky post hole digger and tamping bar. It was like $40. This thing, it’s heavy and you just sort of drop it in the ground and jam it around. It loosens dirt and rocks and anything buried like a champ, and in minutes you’ve got holes for posts! I’ve also used it as a long wedge to break apart some pallets, tamped down some loose grass spots, used it as a long lever to hold up a sagging shed door to fix the hinges, pried up a lot of flagstone…and the list goes on. One day when my truck gets old enough I can see using this thing as a long leverage tool for removing stubborn rusted parts, shocks, etc!? Anyway that’s my tool contribution lol, should have bought this years ago

Scott Sabinson
Scott Sabinson
1 month ago

Rivet nut setter. I tried the DIY way for a few years with it working about 50% of the time. For $50 from Harbor Freight, it was worth twice that amount in frustration and time saved.

Tall_J
Tall_J
1 month ago

I’ve got a few.

1) Electric Ratchet. I finally got one last year and its been a game changer. I’ve dealt with ratchets that slip gears or pop from one direction to another for years. Now, I can just toss on the electric ratchet and boom. A job is done pretty quick.

2) Extendable handle ratchets. I can’t tell you how many times I’m in the middle of a project and realize i need a breaker bar for this one stubborn bolt or nut, which results in a run back to the tool box, digging around for the 1/2in breaker bar I have, inevitably, trying to find the 3/8ths adapter, and then going back to the project at hand. Its so good to just be able to extend the handle and get that extra bit of leverage without needing to run back to my tool chest.

3) An actual mechanics tool chest. I had a small one for a few years that was never enough storage and was a mess (partially my own design). This meant I had my small tool chest with wrenches, a tool box with specialty tools under my work bench, my mechanics tools in the box they came in, hammers in a cabinet….yeah you get the idea. I scored a narrow but tall Craftsman stackable tool chest at Lowes for a song (like 75% off because it was a floor model) and its changed me. I finally have everything in one place, including all of my speciatly tools, air tools, etc. And its organized! The big bonus is that I have a battery charging area, so I can keep my power tools in there too and have ready access to everything I need for a project. Bonus, for big projects, I can just wheel it over next to what I’m working on.

Theotherotter
Theotherotter
1 month ago

Tools I already have:
1)ratcheting wrenches, like the above. I’ve had them for a long time, but when I first got them I was like, “where have you been??”
2)Power tools, see above.

Tools I still don’t have:
1)Air, air, air.

Uglyduckling
Uglyduckling
1 month ago

Nitrile gloves. About a decade ago, I was visiting my mechanic friend Dan, who swore by nitrile gloves, ever since he was changing his brake fluid without gloves, then tasted the fluid in his mouth, apparently carried by his blood circulation. Worn them ever since.

Rapgomi
Rapgomi
1 month ago

So many good ideas and tools here!! I tend to think I have a solid tool collection, but now I have a list of new items to check out.

One thing I would recommend is watching comparison reviews of the tools you are considering buying. Since making that a part of my buying process, I have discovered many new quality brands, often at lower prices than I was prepared to spend.

There are may good utube reviewers, but the one I trust the most is Project Farm.

https://www.youtube.com/@ProjectFarm

Ben
Ben
1 month ago

A cheap dead blow hammer. Much safer than whacking stuff with a regular metal one, both for whatever you’re hitting and for yourself.

A Dremel. It’s amazing how many PITA situations a Dremel can get you out of.

Dudeoutwest
Dudeoutwest
1 month ago

A motorcycle lift. After 35 years of crawling around on the ground, $400 for a Harbor Freight bike lift table has been transformative.

Similarly, Quickjacks have made working on my car about a million times easier than placing jack stands and executing three separate lifting actions to get the car on them.

Also: electric ratchet and a NoMar motorcycle tire changer.

Myk El
Myk El
1 month ago

Getting power tools that all share the same basic battery pack. So not only are they cordless, but means I basically always have a backup battery ready.

Turbotictac
Turbotictac
1 month ago

Electric ratchet 1000%. Also ratcheting wrenches

PlatinumZJ
PlatinumZJ
1 month ago

Not strictly car-related, but it took me an embarrassingly long time to buy a cordless drill. I think I was put off by complaints about battery life and/or discontinued battery packs, but when I decided it was time to install a doorbell camera and realized the only thing holding me back was my lack of desire to deal with extension cords, I finally bought a cordless drill. What a game changer…it’s amazing how much more stuff you’re willing to tackle when you don’t have to worry about locating an outlet. And of course the battery packs are compatible with the manufacturer’s other cordless tools, so I’ve added even more neat stuff to my collection.

Dudeoutwest
Dudeoutwest
1 month ago
Reply to  PlatinumZJ

I now have M18 1/2″ impact, a 1/4″ impact driver for woodworking, a light, and an electric ratchet. I was like you, largely dubious of cordless after some bad experiences in the late 90s.

It gave me the confidence to buy an Ego leaf blower, which has been way better than the corded or 2 stroke leaf blowers I owned before.

Jeff Diamond
Jeff Diamond
1 month ago
Reply to  Dudeoutwest

Same here, bad and expensive experience in the 90s put me off battery powered tools for 2 decades. Relocated about 5 years back and started upgrading my tools. So far, have found Dewalt 20V XR tools to be excellent and am now standardizing on that platform. But, even the much less expensive 20V Craftsman drill I bought 5 years ago to evaluate the cordless’s situation is still hanging in there.

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