Home » You Can Buy An Aston Martin Rapide For The Price Of A New Honda CR-V

You Can Buy An Aston Martin Rapide For The Price Of A New Honda CR-V

Gabel Rapide Ts2
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Before the crossover SUV started to dominate the war on the sedan, several high-end brands decided to experiment with sedans. Lamborghini had the magnificent Estoque concept that was killed in the global recession, Bugatti floated the concept of a sedan in the form of the 16C Galibier concept, Porsche launched the Panamera, and Aston Martin made a four-door of its own happen. The Rapide took what everyone loved about the DB9, stretched it out, added two doors, and unleashed it on the world’s wealthy.

We’re talking about a 5.9-liter V12 engine up front, generating 470 horsepower and sending it all through a six-speed ZF automatic transmission. The zero-to-60 mph dash was dispatched with in a reasonable five seconds flat, while the Rapide lived up to its name with a top speed of 184 mph. Plenty enough thrust to rival the Maserati Quattroporte Sport GT S, although the price tag was out of this world.

Vidframe Min Top
Vidframe Min Bottom

In 2010, the Aston Martin Rapide carried a suggested retail price of $199,950, while the Quattroporte Sport GT S stickered for just $134,700. That’s a $65,250 delta in 2010 dollars. However, if you want an Aston Martin Rapide these days, you won’t pay even close to $65,250 for the entire vehicle. In fact, you can pick up a Rapide for less than the price of a new Honda CR-V. Here’s proof, along with some reasons why you probably shouldn’t attempt to ball this hard on a CR-V budget.

How Cheap Are We Talking?

Grey Aston Martin Rapide Profile

No, for real, some early Rapide models are now up for sale at prices cheaper than a new Honda CR-V. Granted, the most expensive new CR-V you can buy, the Sport Touring Hybrid, is $41,550 including freight, but anything under that figure is fair game, right?

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Right off the rip, here’s a 2010 Aston Martin Rapide that sold earlier this month on Cars & Bids for $28,250. Yep, $28,250. Sure, it had 124,000 miles on the clock and a hit on its Carfax, but this is a genuine V12 ultra-sedan for less than $30,000. Perhaps best of all, it’s a southern car, so it won’t have been exposed to the ravages of rock salt. Not that it matters too much given the car’s bonded aluminum construction.

White Aston Martin Rapide 1

Alright, maybe 124,000 miles is a lot for something made by an exotic carmaker, even if its V12 is based on two Ford V6s. No worries, for here’s a 2011 Aston Martin Rapide that sold on Cars & Bids back in July of 2023 with 78,300 miles on the clock. If we use the patent-pending Autopian method of rounding, which involves two cases of Schlitz and someone who doesn’t know how to use an abacus, that’s nearly half the mileage of the last one I showed you. Don’t whip out your calculators, just go with me here.

White Aston Martin Rapide Interior

This white-on-black car may be of a relatively boring spec, but it has a clean Carfax, rear seat entertainment, and enough dings and scratches to make you not give a shit where you park it. Now that’s freedom right there. The best part? A sale price of $36,000. That’s fairly cheap for a modern V12 anything, let alone an Aston Martin.

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Black Aston Martin Rapide 1

Over on the typical used car classified sites, Rapides continue to be cheap. If you still think murdered-out cars are cool, here’s a 2011 Rapide with 84,802 miles on the clock for $37,499. Sure, it looks like something you haven’t yet unlocked in a video game, but that’s nothing a few hundred dollars worth of alloy wheel refinishing and window tint removal can’t fix.

Maybe Don’t

Grey Aston Martin Rapide Engine

When it comes to owning depreciated cars, I’m not a role model. I own two cars that aren’t driven in winter and zero cars that are. Both of those cars are aged, both are German, and both have their widely-reported foibles. However, if I’m saying you probably shouldn’t buy an Aston Martin Rapide for Honda CR-V money, that means something. Here’s why.

Let’s ease you into things with a minor annoyance: Every Aston Martin of this vintage suffers from lifting interior leather, which, if left unchecked, will make it look like the dashboard is upholstered in finely-tanned scrotums. If the prospect of spending the money to have the leather fixed properly doesn’t sound appealing, you really aren’t going to like what else lies ahead.

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Like any Aston Martin with the 5.9-liter V12, there’s the very real possibility of engines going kaboom. I’ll let Floren, the author of a glorious piece we ran titled “I Bought A ‘Flood-Damaged’ Aston Martin And It’s Taking Over My Life”, explain, as this failure happened to his DB9.

One of the connecting rods broke in two pieces, destroyed one piston and now was trying to escape through the sides of the engine block. On one side the piston made it all the way out, on the other side it only pierced the internal liner. You can see what was left of the offending piston.

Apparently, this is not actually that uncommon! What kind of design would result in this kind of issue happening with any frequency? Because of the size of the block, and the fact that it has 12 pistons, apparently the last two can suffer from oil starvation, which seems to be exactly what happened here.

Replacing an engine is expensive enough in a regular used car, but it’s downright diabolical on something exotic. A quick search on car-part.com reveals that a second-hand good replacement Aston Martin V12 engine will run you about $21,000. Yep, a two, followed by a one, followed by three zeroes. That’s without shipping, labor, replacement gaskets, new engine mounts, you name it. On a sufficiently high-mileage V12 Aston Martin, engine replacement could mechanically total the car.

Scuderia Car Parts AM Brake Pads

However, the biggest problem by many country miles is the Rapide’s boutique status. Small-batch cars often require small-batch parts, and small-batch parts can be astronomically expensive. If a rear damper on a Rapide starts leaking, a quick price check on Scuderia Car Parts reveals that replacements are only sold as a spring-and-damper assembly, and cost $1,758.95 each. Wear out a tie rod end? That’ll cost you in excess of $100 just for the part. Need to replace the front brake discs? You’re looking at $802.45 per brake disc. The pads? A scarcely believable $1,064.37 for the front set. Even without labor, shipping, tax, what have you, new front brake discs and pads will run you $2,669.27 just in parts. Better have pockets deep enough that James Cameron wants to send his submarine into them.

Should I Buy A Dirt-Cheap Rapide?

Let’s see, are you a certified technician with Aston Martin experience and six figures in the bank? If so, you have the right credentials to buy a cheap Rapide. However, if you don’t fit that description, don’t buy a cheap exotic car of any sort. Sure, they look cool, but service costs rarely ever depreciate.

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Kia Stinger Gt

However, if you want a powerful sedan with a bit of style and a fastback profile, you aren’t out of luck. A gently-used 2020 Kia Stinger GT is worth about as much as an early Aston Martin Rapide, is roughly a decade newer, has widespread parts availability, comes with more gadgets, and is just as quick. Sure, it’s an anticlimactic conclusion, but let’s be honest — would you have clicked if this article was titled “You Can Buy A Kia For The Price Of An Aston Martin Rapide”?

(Photo credits: Cars & Bids, CarGurus seller, Scuderia Car Parts, Kia)

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Defenestrator
Defenestrator
28 days ago

This era of Astons is such a mixed bag for parts and reliability. They’re a mix of Ford parts-bin including Volvo and JLR, and bespoke Aston. For standard stuff like spark plugs, O2 sensors, EGR valve, etc you can usually find the exact same part from the exact same manufacturer without an Aston label stuck onto it for a fraction of the price. But then there’s random stuff like headlights and some interior trim pieces that are just absolutely extortionate.

The other problem is that a lot of otherwise-DIYable work on it requires a $20,000 AMDS computer. That also means independent Aston mechanics are fairly uncommon, and even for a 2010 you might find yourself paying dealer prices for anything more involved than an oil change.

Simon Staveley
Simon Staveley
1 month ago

even if its V12 is based on two Ford V6s

Why do people who should know better keep perpetuating this myth? The block, head, and crankshaft designs are completely different from the Ford engines. The V12 might have used some component from the V6 (I believe pistons and some of the valvetrain assembly) but that’s about it.

It’s not like the JLR supercharged 3.0 V6 which literally is the V8 block casting with the back two cylinders blanked off…

Taxi maniac
Taxi maniac
1 month ago

This is a great article.

I like Aston Martin’s but I know it’d be a bad bad idea, but i don’t feel like I lived the experience so maybe I should just buy one to experience the adventure of it all? I’m a handy guy I got some skills. I tend to have good luck. I can manage this…..

Nope def not.

But now I feel like I’ve experienced the adventure without any of the pain and self esteem crushing defeat it would involve in making this incredibly foolish decision.

Lally Singh
Lally Singh
1 month ago

So a 2018 Tesla S with 68k miles is $31,200 around here. Would that compare?

Dinklesmith
Dinklesmith
1 month ago
Reply to  Lally Singh

$1,000 door handle replacements, $3,000 screen replacements galore on those. All of them need their door and hatch seals replaced which can be frustrating. Plus tail lights all allow moisture intrusion.
Tesla also eats suspension parts.

They had the battery and drive train sorted by then at least. A used Tesla with a decent battery is honestly a decent buy if you have your eyes wide open about those common problems

Last edited 1 month ago by Dinklesmith
Torque
Torque
1 month ago
Reply to  Dinklesmith

The Model S door handles were redesigned to be more durable. Looks like going price (quick search) is $200 – $260

Given the Model S is the only Tesla that at least Gruber is willing to fix the hv battery pack, which could actually make it a reasonable long term ev

Harvey Park
Harvey Park
1 month ago

> A gently-used 2020 Kia Stinger GT

Does anybody cross shop a big V12 with a Stinger GT? Those are radically different driving experiences.

Cheap Bastard
Cheap Bastard
1 month ago

“A quick search on car-part.com reveals that a second-hand good replacement Aston Martin V12 engine will run you about $21,000. Yep, a two, followed by a one, followed by three zeroes. That’s without shipping, labor, replacement gaskets, new engine mounts, you name it. On a sufficiently high-mileage V12 Aston Martin, engine replacement could mechanically total the car.”

So just literally half-ass it and throw in a junkyard Duratec V6.

Job done! Kinda.

LarsVargas
LarsVargas
1 month ago
Reply to  Cheap Bastard

Or get two of ’em and a case of Natty Light. Invite a friend with a welder over and have a weekend of fun making a V12 from scratch. That’ll pretty much re-enact what Ford did

Pedro
Pedro
1 month ago

Boooring…I’ll hold out for the Nissan GT-R for less than a Hyundai or something. A little swagger!

Amberturnsignalsarebetter
Amberturnsignalsarebetter
1 month ago

Where can I get a CR-V for $28,250? Cheapest inventory in my neck of the woods is over $32k

Last edited 1 month ago by Amberturnsignalsarebetter
Morgan van Humbeck
Morgan van Humbeck
1 month ago

I very well might have clicked on the article if it was titled “you can buy a Kia for the price of an Aston”. It goes against type! Always a way to make something interesting

Willin58
Willin58
1 month ago

As an ’07 DB9 owner, articles like this bother me. Anyone who reads this site would do their homework before buying one… The PAG-era Astons have proven to be quite reliable, in both V8 and V12 forms. Sure, there are documented issues to look out for, but most cars do. The leather issue only affects cars that have baked in the sun without proper (any) leather care. The V12 oil starvation issue was resolved via recall back in 2008. And finally, no one buys parts from Scuderia unless absolutely necessary. Porterfield pads are relatively cheap, for example. I knew of all these issues (including the dreaded V12 tick), before becoming the 3rd owner of mine and I don’t regret it one bit.

Morgan van Humbeck
Morgan van Humbeck
1 month ago
Reply to  Willin58

Thanks for sharing. I deeply dig that alternate perspective. Mostly because I could never bring myself to buy a Kia instead of an Aston, no matter how life destroying a choice it might be

JC Miller
JC Miller
1 month ago
Reply to  Willin58

The fix was actually hilarious! They literally gave everyone a shorter dipstick

Willin58
Willin58
1 month ago
Reply to  JC Miller

Yup, crazy, right? From 11 qts to about 13 full. At least it’s Ow40, which is also cheap.

PaysOutAllNight
PaysOutAllNight
1 month ago
Reply to  JC Miller

They literally gave everyone a shorter dipstick

Which is directly opposite of the impression men are trying to make when buying an exotic car…

Lally Singh
Lally Singh
1 month ago

What do you think we’ll equipped men drive?

Hint: motorcycles.

YeahMoto!
YeahMoto!
1 month ago
Reply to  Lally Singh

I’ll make sure to show this to my wife.

Last edited 1 month ago by YeahMoto!
PaysOutAllNight
PaysOutAllNight
1 month ago
Reply to  Willin58

I’m glad you’re here. I’m hoping to have all in place to buy a used Porsche later this year or early next, and love the Panamera, but I’ve always liked the DB9. To me, the 4 door looks every bit as good. And I have plenty of time for research.

Bonded aluminum construction is a big deal to me, even if I never take it out in the snow. Was once shopping for an Audi A8, but truth is, I’d probably trust a used Aston Martin V12 over a used Audi 4.2l V8.

$260 a set for fronts pads and $179 for the rear set isn’t really all that bad.

Last edited 1 month ago by PaysOutAllNight
Torque
Torque
1 month ago

This AM IS attractive.
Getting this AM vs. any Porsche depends on your use case.

If you want something pretty as a weekend car either will do.

If you want a DD…
100% I would expect the Porsche would be up for the task. Porsches are the only more expensive brands where their products seem to actually be made to be driven daily.

And yes I would do my research to know how much I should include in an annual budget to keep up with the needed running costs. At least $2 – $3K seems light a good (minimum) place to start

PaysOutAllNight
PaysOutAllNight
1 month ago
Reply to  Torque

I’m not planning to daily drive either a Porsche or anything else I consider in its place. I prefer something efficient for that.

My daily is a Honda Clarity PHEV and that won’t change until the Honda dies or someone comes up with a PHEV convertible.

$25-30k purchase, and $3k annual is the budget, but I hope to keep both much lower than that.

Lardo
Lardo
1 month ago
Reply to  Willin58

Scuderia? that sounds $$$. the examples used are the most extreme and to prove the point.

Greensoul
Greensoul
1 month ago

I can only imagine what service costs would be on a Rapide. Damm good looking car though. Isn’t there a saying about buying a once very expensive car on the cheap….

Lava5.0
Lava5.0
1 month ago
Reply to  Greensoul

Actually, annual service on the my DBS with the same v12 was around 2400 dollars. Expensive yes for what they did but in terms of annual maintenance on a supercar it wasn’t astronomical. The problem is when issues arise because part shortage are a real thing. My steering wheel leather is worn for example, and there not another steering wheel in the country for sale (new). Also, don’t mess up the carbon ceramic brakes.

Cam.man67
Cam.man67
1 month ago

Things I trust more than a cheap Aston Martin (actually, any Aston Martin):

1: Subaru head gaskets at 50 pounds of boost.

2: RWD and summer tires in a blizzard.

3: Any politician.

4: Gas station sushi.

Shooting Brake
Shooting Brake
1 month ago
Reply to  Cam.man67

Gas station sushi ._:(´ཀ`」∠):_

Gubbin
Gubbin
1 month ago

That last sentence – I cackled.

Cerberus
Cerberus
1 month ago

I miss when this was Espada and Montreal territory, either of which I’d gladly deal with over one of these or any other contemporary AM or Maserati. These modern Tier 2/3 exotics do nothing for me. They’re fragile, expensive, high maintenance PITAs without the looks, mechanical connection, character, and they’re far from the appreciation curve. This is only slightly less than what I paid for a GR86 and I’d much rather drive that.

Geoff Buchholz
Geoff Buchholz
1 month ago

Oh, yeah, how IS Floren doing?

XXLTall
XXLTall
1 month ago

Buy it if it goes south just LS swap away from going again.

Collin B
Collin B
1 month ago

I hate to be that guy but the $65,250 between the rapide and quattroporte isn’t a “delta.” A delta is the change in a something, like the increase in GT-R MSRP over the past 15 years, not just the difference between any two numbers. Just an fyi for future reference.

Urban Runabout
Urban Runabout
1 month ago

It’s not like it’s was ever intended as a daily driver.
Keep it in an air-conditioned garage – plan on spending $3000 annually in maintenance – drive it gently to the Cars and Coffee every few months, no more than 1000 miles a year – and when it blows up, it’s a nice doorstop.

Harvey Park
Harvey Park
1 month ago
Reply to  Urban Runabout

The person who put 124k miles on theirs is my hero. These machines are made to be driven.

Mr Sarcastic
Mr Sarcastic
1 month ago

OK first flood damage exotic VS used exotic is a totally different level of stupid. Second if it is just 2 Ford V6s why all the trouble. Third is the $22,000 replacement engine redesigned to solve oil flow issue or is there a fix? I have heard larger input and smaller drain holes help this issue. Seems to me a well kept cheap body attached to a more reliable well kept donee make is a compromise. Like over a KIA Stinger?
And before any naysayers post it isn’t any more idiotic than a cheap AM.

Last edited 1 month ago by Mr Sarcastic
Mr. Canoehead
Mr. Canoehead
1 month ago

I’d get better service at a non-existent Aston Dealer over any of the Kia dealers in my city.

Manwich Sandwich
Manwich Sandwich
1 month ago

This story reminds me of the old story about James May talking about his Bentley T2:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?app=desktop&v=vJNvVXq76Es

Data
Data
1 month ago

Go ahead and buy that Kia, but don’t come crying to me when they quote you for the Ion flush. 😛

MikeInTheWoods
MikeInTheWoods
1 month ago
Reply to  Data

Better than Aston’s Account Balance Flush.

Squirrelmaster
Squirrelmaster
1 month ago

As a long-time Aston fan, I’ve dreamt of the day when I could pick up one for cheap. The problem is, I’m nowhere near wealthy enough to pick up a cheap Aston.

Mr Sarcastic
Mr Sarcastic
1 month ago
Reply to  Squirrelmaster

Well if you buy an AM cheap what you get is a cheap AM.

Sklooner
Sklooner
1 month ago

Yeah I don’t see this model on Rockauto for parts

Mr Sarcastic
Mr Sarcastic
1 month ago
Reply to  Sklooner

Unbelievable, Rockauto has everything. AAMOF my Isuzu VX has a rear cargo door not a trunk. But Rockauto offers the trunk lid, weatherstripping, trim, and all kinds of parts for the VX that the VX doesn’t have. So 2 takes from this Rockauto doesn’t have the rare parts it claims to have but it does have the common parts that don’t exist.
This is why I don’t use Rockauto or any site that uses the same auto search as the cheap junk providers.

Torque
Torque
1 month ago
Reply to  Mr Sarcastic

I’m sure FCP Euro got you covered 🙂

RataTejas
RataTejas
1 month ago

Truth. A wise man on the Aprilia Motorcycle forum, and Ferrari owner once said;

“You don’t buy a Ferrari when you can afford one. You buy it when you can afford six of them.”

That way nothing scares you when stuff has to be fixed.

Bill Garcia
Bill Garcia
1 month ago
Reply to  RataTejas

As a former Aprilia owner who had his bike towed 15x in one year due to mechanical issues, I can understand where the wise man was coming from.

16-year old me was not such a wise man (but he was in way better shape than me!)

RataTejas
RataTejas
1 month ago
Reply to  Bill Garcia

I’ve owned two, a 2004 Caponord and a 2004 Futura. Sold the Futura, and the Capo is currently garage art, but never had a problem with either. They can be fussy if you start having problems with the electrics.

Bill Garcia
Bill Garcia
1 month ago
Reply to  RataTejas

Mine was a “temperamental” RS 125. God bless the smell and sound of a high-strung two stroke!

RataTejas
RataTejas
1 month ago
Reply to  Bill Garcia

My wallet thanks me continuously that I’m too much of a fat ass to fit on that bike. Sooooo sexy, fast, amazing and fussy as hell. Perfect Italian.

Torque
Torque
1 month ago
Reply to  RataTejas

Or (same idea…)
Before buying a car that cost $200k new, you might want to have a boat or plane that similarly cost that new.

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