Home » BMW Z3 M Coupe, Plymouth Valiant Signet 200, Royal Enfield Diesel: Mercedes’ Marketplace Madness

BMW Z3 M Coupe, Plymouth Valiant Signet 200, Royal Enfield Diesel: Mercedes’ Marketplace Madness

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Welcome back to Mercedes’ Marketplace Madness! As you know, I love picking up dirt-cheap cars, motorcycles, and campers, and then telling you lovely readers about the dumb things that I do with them. I’m always looking for the next deal, but most of the time, I’m left empty-handed. At the same time, I love building a list of cars, trucks, and motorcycles that I would buy if I had the money.

Mercedes’ Marketplace Madness turns the long list of vehicles I’d love to buy into something for you all to enjoy. Some of them are cheap and some of them are not. Some of the vehicles I find are purely window shopping for everyone other than a collector like Beau or Myron.

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Vidframe Min Bottom

According to my records, it’s been almost a whole month since the last Marketplace Madness entry. Between my vacation, the Los Angeles Auto Show, and the holidays, I had to pass up writing another entry. Admittedly, it takes a lot of time to research nine completely different vehicles, so these stories take a while to compile. But fear not, because I am back! This week, I’ve decided to stick to a price ceiling of $20,000, with one vehicle allowed to go slightly over that.

Let’s take a peek!

1971 GAZ-22 – $15,450

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Facebook Seller

GAZ, which is said to translate to Gorky Automobile Plant, was formed in 1929 after the Soviet Union signed a deal with Ford. In this deal, the Soviets bought $13 million worth of Ford cars and parts and in exchange, Ford would lend its expertise in helping the new brand get off the ground. According to the GAZ Museum, the Soviets sought to build 100,000 cars a year. In 1931, the first Ford kits left the Nizhny Novgorod factory.

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The GAZ-22 was built in Nizhny Novgorod. What you’re looking at here is the wagon version of the GAZ-21. News publication Radio Free Europe described the GAZ-21 as the first Soviet car to rival the tech seen in the western world. The car, called Volga, would have styling inspired by American cars plus features such as a cigarette lighter, a heater, a radio, a reclining front seat, and a windshield washer. Most of those were options on American cars back in those days. Of course, these were luxuries for buyers in the Soviet Union.

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Facebook Seller

The car sat high on an independent front suspension and rear live axle. And given the rough environments of the Soviet Union, that suspension was built to take a beating while the body had some rust protection. According to local press, these cars found roles in taxi and police duty due to their durability. This GAZ-22 comes from the third and final series before the Volga was replaced with the GAZ-24. It’s powered by a 2.5-liter inline four making 75 HP and it’s shifted through a three-speed on-the-tree.

It’s $15,450 from the seller in Issaquah, Washington.

1947 Frazer Manhattan – $11,000

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Facebook Seller

Formed in July 1945, Kaiser-Frazer combined the strengths of shipbuilder Henry J. Kaiser and auto executive Joseph W. Frazer. As Curbside Classic writes, the two men were powerhouses in their industries. Reportedly, Henry J. Kaiser was responsible for what would become the world’s first articulated bus. During World War II, his shipbuilding might was demonstrated with 1,490 ships constructed for the Navy and the Merchant Marine. Joseph W. Frazer carried his own impressive resume, including stints at Chrysler, Maxwell, Willys-Overland, and more. As Hemmings notes, Kaiser-Frazer saw early success in selling vehicles across a range of price points.

What would become the Kaiser-Frazer was originally just a model designed by Darrin that, reportedly, was expected to be something for Frazer to show investors as he tried to build cash for the company. Instead, Frazer tossed the design over to John Maxwell Associates, where Darrin’s work was tweaked into a mass-production vehicle. That car went into production in 1946. The automaker quickly ran into a problem. It had a car but it didn’t have the resources to design more. That’s where Carlton Spencer came in. Spencer used the resources available to create a vehicle with more luxurious materials, trim, and interior. The resulting vehicle was the Manhattan.

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Facebook Seller

The $2,250 Manhattan’s competition included cars such as the Chrysler New Yorker and Packard Deluxe Eight. This example is said to be a clean car from Texas. A restoration was done about 25 years ago and it seems to be holding up ok. Power comes from a 226.2 cubic inch six rated for 120 HP, that’s bolted to a three-speed manual. It’s $11,000 from the seller in Willoughby, Ohio with 46,000 miles.

2011 Acura TSX Sport Wagon – $12,000

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Facebook Seller

Honda says the Acura TSX was created in 2003 to complement the 3.2 TL and 3.5 RL. Back then, Honda said the car was designed to compete with European competition including the Audi A4 and BMW 3 Series. The TSX was also sort of an opportunity to own forbidden fruit in the USA. From Honda:

The TSX is based on the sophisticated European Honda Accord, a completely different and more performance-oriented vehicle than U.S. Accord models. This lineage makes perfect sense for Acura, because the European Accord is a high-line, high-performance vehicle that directly competes with the German luxury brands. In Europe or the U.S., as the European Accord or TSX, this vehicle competes with the same European origin sedans.

The successor to the original TSX was released in 2008. This car was based on the eighth-generation Accord that was sold in both Japan and Europe. Honda says the second generation TSX was designed to be “more Acura” than its predecessor, which seems to imply it’s a little more American than before. Once again, Acura’s target demographic was the young professional, specifically the kind of young professional who might otherwise find themselves in an Audi A4 2.0T, BMW 328i, Infiniti G37, Lexus IS 250, or Mercedes-Benz C300.

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Facebook Seller

For the 2011 model year, Acura decided to give us a long roof version with the TSX Sport Wagon. Sadly, Acura missed out on a few critical parts. The wagon was locked out of the manual transmission offering and it also couldn’t be had with the 3.5-liter V6, which made 280 HP. Instead, wagon buyers got the base 2.4-liter K24 four making 201 HP and 172 lb-ft of torque connected to a five-speed automatic. For sure, this wagon isn’t really for the person looking for thrill but for a handsome modern wagon.

It appears that any TSX Sport Wagon without body damage is $10,000 and up. This example in Hamburg, Pennsylvania appears to be in good shape and the seller states it’s not rusty. Options include the Technology Package and modifications include an LED light conversion and exhaust tips from the Honda S2000. It’s $12,000 with 132,340 miles.

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1962 Plymouth Valiant Signet 200 – $13,500

Valiantvaliant
Facebook Seller

Some time ago, David taught me a valuable lesson. If you want an affordable classic car, find something that isn’t popular. Scroll past those Tri-Five Chevys and those top-spec Challengers and find yourself a classic car with four doors or a classic car that’s been eclipsed by far more famous cars. I think the Plymouth Valiant fits that latter category. You’re looking at a top-of-the-line classic here, but for a price cheaper than a Mitsubishi Mirage.

David thinks the biggest plus about the Valiant is its slant six engine, fondly called the Leaning Tower Of Power by Mopar fans. This packaging triumph is also a durable powerplant. I’ll let David explain:

That’s the nickname for the most unkillable American motor in history: The Chrysler slant six — so named for the 30-degree angle that its cylinder bores make with the Z-axis (Aside: in the auto engineering world, the X-axis runs the length of the car, Y-axis runs cross-car, and Z-axis goes up and down). By modern standards, this is an old-school engine, though in 1960, it was replacing flathead motors whose valves were in the engine block. In a flathead engine, the pistons move down and take air in through a carburetor perched atop an intake manifold. Once through the carb, that air goes through the manifold and up through the intake valve, then flows laterally across the engine, down the bore, back up during the piston’s exhaust stroke, across the the engine again, and then down through an exhaust valve. The exhaust is expelled through an exhaust manifold and exhaust pipe.

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Facebook Seller

Though in the late 1950s many vehicles also had “F-head” designs in which one valve was directly above the cylinder bore, this still wasn’t as efficient as the purely overhead valve setup that really caught on in the 1950s and that dominates the auto industry today (though today’s engines also have camshafts above the cylinders, and are called “overhead cam” engines; “overhead valve” usually refers to cam-in-block pushrod engines, but this is getting into the weeds a bit).

The engine was a big deal when it came out, and so was its debut-vehicle, the Valiant, which wasn’t officially called a Plymouth until 1961. The Valiant was Chrysler’s compact sedan meant to compete with Chevy’s Corvair and Ford’s Falcon. Designed by the man who played a big part in the proliferation of humongous tail fins in the 1950s, Virgil Exner, the first-gen Valiant was an odd-looking machine, but it was popular. It offered AC, a push-button automatic transmission, unibody construction, multiple body styles (two-door, four-door, wagon), and became a mainstay of American vehicular transport for decades.

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Facebook Seller

If you’re interested in that classic David Tracy engine deep dive, head over to the old site and enjoy. This Plymouth Valiant Signet 200 comes from the vehicle’s first generation and this one comes equipped with that fabled slant six engine. In this vehicle, the slant six is a 145 HP 225 cubic inch unit. Signet 200 signified the top-end hardtop model. It had some special appointments such as a black grille, pleated bucket seats, deep-pile carpeting, and more period luxuries.

This Valiant Signet 200 is said to have a three-speed column-shift manual and numerous original parts. Apparently, the trunk lid isn’t original, but you do get the original one in the sale. It’s $13,500 from the seller in Shrewsbury, Massachusetts with 64,000 miles.

1957 AJS Model 16MS – $5,000

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Facebook Seller

This 1957 AJS Model 16MS isn’t a huge motorcycle, but it looks like a lot of fun. You’re getting 348cc single good for 16 HP and a top speed of around 78 mph.

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Here’s some history from the UK’s National Motor Museum:

The Stevens Screw Company Ltd of Wolverhampton started manufacturing motor cycles under the A J Stevens (AJS) name in 1909. In 1931 financial difficulties led to a takeover by Matchless and production moved to London. From 1937 the parent company traded as Associated Motor Cycles Ltd.

Introduced in 1945, the Model 16M was the AJS version of the wartime military Matchless G3L. The models only differ in the position of the magneto, in front of the cylinder on the AJS and behind on the Matchless. The frame is a conventional rigid design with ‘Teledraulic’ forks. First registered in February 1946, this bike remained with one family from 1947 until 2010.

The Matchless G3/L was developed in 1939 for use in the British Army. An evolution of the G3, the G3/L was a lightweight model that fit the British War Office’s demand for a motorcycle with off-road capability. An innovation brought on by the development of the G3/L was the telescopic fork. Ultimately, the War Office went with Triumph’s military motorcycles, but Matchless was called into action after Triumph’s factory was destroyed in 1940.

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Facebook Seller

Associated Motor Cycles sent 80,000 motorcycles into World War II and after the war, surplus motorcycles were sold to the public. Production of the Model 16 also continued. Over the years, the Model 16 got evolutionary updates such as a dual seat and a new transmission. The Model 16MS represents another development. Until 1949, these motorcycles had a hard tail. The MS variant has a rear suspension.

This 1957 AJS Model 16MS looks to be in good condition, but it hasn’t run in a few years and it needs a kick start spring. The seller appears to be open to negotiation on the $5,000 price. You can get it from the seller in Las Vegas, Nevada.

2000 BMW Z3 M Coupe – $22,800

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Facebook Seller

This performance coupe is nicknamed the “Clown Shoe” by its beloved fans. Look up and the vehicle basically explains itself. The Z3 Coupe is the work of engineers who built the car in secret before presenting it to BMW management. The man running the Z3 Roadster program, Burkhard Göschel, thought the Z3 deserved to be more than just a cushy convertible. So he and the rest of the engineering team added a roof, creating a car 2.6 times stiffer than the roadster. The car also had to be cost-effective to produce. As a result, most of the body panels are shared between the Z3 Roadster and the Z3 Coupe.

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Here’s what BMW says about the Z3 Coupe:

The design of the Z3 M Coupé consciously echoes one of the great BMW historic sports cars: The line of the roof is reminiscent of the BMW 328 Mille Miglia from the 1940s. Besides the wider track and four-pipe exhaust, the top model had exclusive, characteristic accents like oval overtaking mirrors, chrome gills that recall the legendary BMW 507 Roadster, and special air intakes in the front spoiler. The powerful, unmistakeable appearance of the M Coupé was underlined by its proportions: long wheelbase, long bonnet, wide track and short rear end. Introduced by a striking line at the rear and arching towards the back, the roof left a strong impression. The M automobile makes it absolutely clear to the observer: This is a sports car for individualists

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Facebook Seller

Power comes from BMW’s 3.2-liter S52 straight six making 240 HP and 236 lb-ft torque. The selling dealership says this example is rust-free and is lowered on a set of coilovers. Allegedly, all maintenance is current. It’s $22,800 from Prime Auto Group in Anoka, Minnesota with 75,045 miles.

1966 Pontiac Bonneville – $17,000

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Facebook Seller

Here’s a classic that appears to be frozen in time. It’s as if someone parked it in a garage and then forgot about it for decades. The seller says this Pontiac Bonneville is mostly original. It’s unclear how often this car was driven, but the seller says the car is riding on 40-year-old rotted bias ply tires.

The Pontiac Bonneville was introduced in 1957 for the 1958 model year. Prior to its launch as a standalone model, the Bonneville name appeared on the 1957 Star Chief as well as a concept. The Star Chief Bonneville was notable for its luxury and mechanical fuel-injection system. This car comes from the Bonneville’s fourth-generation. By now, Pontiac had established itself as GM’s performance car division, and the vehicles reflected this. The Bonneville was Pontiac’s most powerful full-size model on the market at the time.

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Facebook Seller

This Bonneville sports a 389 cubic inch V8 rated at 333 HP Gross and a Turbo-Hydramatic 400 transmission. I found a video about this car on YouTube, where Cam Racing explains what has been done to the vehicle. The Bonnie’s brake lines have been replaced and the engine bay has been freshened up, including new paint. There is some minimal rust, but nothing too bad.

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It’s $17,000 from the seller in Naperville, Illinois with 56,000 miles.

1972 Royal Enfield Diesel – $1,681

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OLX Seller

If you couldn’t tell by my history pieces, I have a fascination with diesel-powered motorcycles. I’d love to bring one home, but they always seem either too expensive or too far away. This 1998 Royal Enfield Diesel sits in that latter category. It’s Rs.140,000, which apparently translates to just $1,681. I’d buy that motorcycle today! However, it’s in Vadanappally, India. I know how to get a car from Japan to the United States. I’ve even found a person to help me get cars from the UK. I have no idea how to get something like this motorcycle into America.

Here’s some history from my retrospective:

When the Taurus was introduced, a Bullet 350 made about 18 horses from its 346cc four-stroke single. This was good for a top speed nearing 70 mph, depending heavily on conditions. Royal Enfield’s history page doesn’t say why the Diesel was put into production, but DriveSpark reports that it had to do with fuel prices at the time. Diesel was reportedly about half of the price of gasoline back then, making a diesel-powered bike compelling, even if the motorcycle was more expensive upfront.

Housed in the familiar Bullet frame is something different. The Taurus ditched spark ignition for a 325cc diesel single made by Greaves Lombardini in Italy. This air-cooled industrial engine is good for 6.5 HP and 10.7 lb-ft torque. As you could imagine, these are slow and top speed hovers around 49 mph. That makes its performance about on the level of a 125cc gas motorcycle. According to an owner’s manual that I found, these weigh in at a heavy 370 pounds as well.

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OLX Seller

Royal Enfield says Diesel production began in 1993 while some Indian motorcycle news sites say the Diesel was a product of the 1980s. So, it seems unclear when production began. It’s possible the seller here entered a typo when writing the model year. Or, it’s an older bike with the Diesel’s engine. Either way, I want it.

Royal Enfield claimed these motorcycles should return 200 mpg. The seller for this Enfield Diesel says this bike gets the equivalent of 258 mpg. Incredible. The seller also states that the motorcycle has been restored and bears new paint. It’s $1,681 from the seller on OLX if you can somehow get it over here.

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1988 Ford F-350 – $16,900

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Hemmings Seller

Here’s a single cab, dual rear wheel 1-ton truck with a long bed, cab lights, and some patina from use. It’s not a perfect truck, but I love the way it looks. This truck comes from the eighth generation of the F-Series, which ran from 1986 to 1991 in North America. Ford’s retelling is short and to the point: Eighth-generation F-Series features a more aerodynamic design, available electronic fuel injection, redesigned interior including instrument panel, and rear antilock brakes.

This F-350 is an XLT Lariat, which Ford says comes with a folding center armrest, a leather-wrapped steering wheel, color-coded carpet, color-coded headliner, door pocket storage, swinging mirrors, a tailgate applique, power door locks and windows, a cloth interior, and more.

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Hemmings Seller

According to the seller, this truck spent all of its life in West Virginia before heading over to Pennsylvania. Everything is said to work as it should, save for the fuel gauge when reading from the second fuel tank. Power comes from a 7.5-liter V8 rated for 225 HP and 390 lb-ft of torque. That’s backed by a five-speed manual transmission and 3.55:1 gears.

It’s $16,900 or best offer from the seller in Washington, Pennsylvania. The truck has 51,064 miles and the highest offer thus far was $10,000.

That’s it for this week! Thank you for reading.

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Shop-Teacher
Shop-Teacher
2 months ago

That Bonneville is so pretty!!!

Crank Shaft
Crank Shaft
2 months ago

FYI: Almost positive the BMW Clown Shoe is a salvage rebuild.

Seller mentions it’s from FL. Facebook reviews mentions previously undisclosed salvage title surprises. Check of VIN from seller’s website on Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles shows Cancelled titled with “REBUILDABLE” Salvage status.

Otherwise a very desirable car that got hurricane totaled.

Mike F.
Mike F.
2 months ago
Reply to  Crank Shaft

I was thinking that it was priced low for an S52 version.

Crank Shaft
Crank Shaft
2 months ago

I was genuinely tempted to buy it until said discovery. It sure is a coin toss, because I’m still tempted even knowing the salvage status. 😀

Unclewolverine
Unclewolverine
2 months ago

Mercedes, please convince the autopian overloards to send you to India to write a piece; “How many Royal Enfield diesels can I fit in a shipping container?” Then bring them back here for crazy diesel bike enthusiasts to enjoy!

Last edited 2 months ago by Unclewolverine
Torque
Torque
2 months ago
Reply to  Unclewolverine

I know a former logistics vp that did exactly this for trips to Italy. In which case he bought as many Vestas and sometimes Piaggio Apes that could fit in a shipping container and ship them hm to the US & sell them here. Not only would it pay for his trips, he’d make a profit each time.

Rich Hobbs
Rich Hobbs
3 months ago

The Valiant looks good to go. Two door with a stack? Fake spare tire cover on trunk? Exner at his best. Bucket seats? Damn skippy! Put Sniper efi on it, dual exhaust…maybe a four speed? Oh, to dream! Long as we’re dreaming, the Gaz wagon with an LS hear transplant, AOD trans, 12 bolt rear end… damn, I’m drooling..????

TOSSABL
TOSSABL
3 months ago

Mercedes finally found a motorcycle I actively want: classic looks and a clattery diesel. Good thing it’s in India. Were I to actually buy something here, the GAZ edges out the Valiant because obscure funky old wagon. I love that greenhouse.

Hamish48
Hamish48
3 months ago

There was a legend in the day of little old ladies being convinced by gas station attendants (remember them?) that their slant six engine was falling over and required immediate attention by their dealer.

Delta 88
Delta 88
3 months ago

I’m honestly surprised that DT calls the slant 6 the “most unkillable American motor in history” and not the Jeep 4.0. I mean, don’t get me wrong, it’s definitely a hell of a motor, but even my GM apologist ass has to hand the crown to the 4.0. I’d be interested in hearing his reasons.

Honorable mention to the Ford 300 inline 6

PaysOutAllNight
PaysOutAllNight
3 months ago

What a great roundup.

The Bonneville is an underappreciated classic, the clown shoe would be a blast to thrash, both bikes look like fun classics for sunny days, I’ve always loved the Manhattan, and the GAZ would be an exceptional slow cruiser to confuse the onlookers.

On the other hand, the Acura is one I have a lot of uses for right now. That’s the one I’d buy right now if I had space for it.

The Ford truck and the Valiant are the only ones that don’t spark real interest from me this week. I don’t want or need a dually, and early Valiants don’t speak my language.

Freelivin1327
Freelivin1327
3 months ago

Nice selection! I want that beautiful Bonneville so bad…what awesome condition. Well, going to start saving $ now…

121gwats
121gwats
3 months ago

The clown shoe is the obvious winner, everyone else can go home. Not even close. I’d nominate the Acura wagon for second place, but that was never offered in a manual.. fine, still second place by default. The Valiant looks like a caricature of a 50’s car with an unfortunate grill. I value my skin, so the bikes are out.

Goblin
Goblin
3 months ago

The most beautiful thing in the Gaz-21/22 was the speedometer. It was transparent/transclucent, with a light blue acrylic panel in the front and transparent in the back. By day, sunlight would get in from the back of the speedo, as it was a half-sphere-ish thing just sitting on the dash.

T’was beautiful.
Can be (sorta) seen here at 7m36s:

https://youtu.be/ceDMJmjLOIo?t=456

TOSSABL
TOSSABL
3 months ago
Reply to  Goblin

That’s a way cool detail: thanks!

Rich Hobbs
Rich Hobbs
3 months ago
Reply to  Goblin

The 55 Ford had very similar speedo. Clear window on rear of it to let the sun in. For whatever reason the 56 did not have this.

Turkina
Turkina
3 months ago

Although the TSX wagon never came with a V6 or manual, I always thought of it as something I’d love to run the tires off as a car to get from place to place, where places might be far away on windy roads. Holds my stuff. Has some cushiony bits. The beak? I can live with it since it isn’t too huge. I’d just have to figure out what to do with the ancient nav system. Does it also act as the stereo display? What does one do when that ‘modern’ technology becomes obsolete? At least on older cars, you can swap in a fancy double-DIN head unit that plays cat videos when you’re at a stoplight.

Geoff Buchholz
Geoff Buchholz
3 months ago
Reply to  Turkina

On my second-gen TL the nav system also handles some HVAC functions, so it can’t easily be swapped out. I had a double-DIN CarPlay receiver put in to replace the old head unit, so the nav screen usually just displays time.

Collegiate Autodidact
Collegiate Autodidact
3 months ago

Supposedly some of the designers of the BMW Z3 coupe were fans of the film Harold and Maude and drew inspiration from Harold’s Jaguar E-Type hearse. The similarities are undeniably strong and indeed pleasing. How cool is that??
http://imcdb.org/i006262.jpg

HOT_HATCH
HOT_HATCH
3 months ago

22K seems cheap for the clown shoe. I remember those being pricey just a couple years ago.

Mike Harrell
Mike Harrell
3 months ago

“…from the seller in Issaquah, Washington.”

Every now and then I am reminded that they are near me and that they have a variety of interesting vehicles for sale. Sigh.

https://tachanka.com/

Toecutter
Toecutter
3 months ago

I clicked on this link for the Clown Shoe. I don’t even like the way it looks, but it is on my list of dream cars.

Rad Barchetta
Rad Barchetta
3 months ago
Reply to  Toecutter

Me too, but mainly to see what’s wrong with it. I’ve learned to be very afraid of BMWs at bargain prices. The phrases “If it seems too good to be true, it probably is” and “There is no such thing as a cheap BMW” are interchangeable in my book.

Cryptoenologist
Cryptoenologist
3 months ago
Reply to  Rad Barchetta

They are known to have rear subframe cracking problems if IIRC. Different type of problem, but similarly deadly to IMS bearings in a 996. I think it’s both expensive and best done proactively.

Edit: it’s not a terrible job. But not cheap if you can’t do it yourself.
http://www.bimmerbrothers.com/z3-m-coupe-rear-subframe-reinforcement-part-1/

Last edited 3 months ago by Cryptoenologist
TOSSABL
TOSSABL
3 months ago
Reply to  Toecutter

The price does seem a bit low. Being a 2000, it should have the S52, not the S54 which keyboard warriors will say is the only one to have: that might be part of the reason. My BIL has one and installed a supercharger & steeper rearend gears. To my old ass, that thing goes fast, fast.

Steve Balistreri
Steve Balistreri
3 months ago

That’s actually a decent price for a clown shoe, those cars have gotten really expensive the last few years

Morgan Thomas
Morgan Thomas
3 months ago

The Valiant for me. would sit nicely beside my Australian-spec 1962 Valiant 4 door auto.

AlterId
AlterId
2 months ago
Reply to  Morgan Thomas

Just put this one on the left side to keep the driver’s doors from hitting each other.

What?

Oh, all right.

Tim Cougar
Tim Cougar
3 months ago

1966 was a good year for Pontiac.

I’ll take that Bonneville, the Frazer, and the GAZ (but I wouldn’t want to pay full price because it doesn’t have the beautiful leaping stag hood ornament). And that F-350 has a hitch for a 5th wheel so it could tow them all home.

CSRoad
CSRoad
3 months ago

The Valiant is interesting to me as a 1960 Valiant 4 door was my first car although not as fancy as this example. It does have the earlier fake spare trunk lid. I long desired the 2 door wagon to make into a drag car, but it never happened. As for the Clown Shoe I have a secret desire for one of those, I think that’s normal around here.

Vic Vinegar
Vic Vinegar
3 months ago

I really like the Valiant. Cool design, I don’t think I’ve ever seen one, price of entry isn’t bad.

The Bonnie is cool too if you could get it sorted since it sat for so long.

Squirrelmaster
Squirrelmaster
3 months ago

I’m liking that Bonneville and TSX wagon, but most of all the clownshoe. I am rather indifferent on the regular Z3, but love the Z3M coupe.

I also had a friend with the TSX wagon, and while it didn’t get the V6, the K24 still felt more than adequate and the car was fun. The biggest killer was the lack of manual transmission, but overall it was a nice, practical, and fun car.

TXJeepGuy
TXJeepGuy
3 months ago
Reply to  Squirrelmaster

I don’t think the TSX was ever available with the V6. Its based on the Euro Accord, smaller than our Accord, and not designed for the V6. They were all K24’s IIRC.

Squirrelmaster
Squirrelmaster
3 months ago
Reply to  TXJeepGuy

The V6 became an option sometime around 2010.

TXJeepGuy
TXJeepGuy
2 months ago

Good to know. I’m assuming Automatic only? Might explain why I didn’t know.

Iwannadrive637
Iwannadrive637
3 months ago

That Bonneville is so gorgeous it hurts. There’s another one I’ll never have. My parents had a 64 Bonneville and it was my pleasure to wax those massive chrome bumpers.

Doctor Nine
Doctor Nine
3 months ago
Reply to  Iwannadrive637

Yeah, the Bonneville, hands down. The interior is immaculate. My innate consumer purchasing desire is a roiling, thumping mass for that vehicle. OMG…

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