Home » Here Are Seven Unforgettable Cars That’ll Put A Smile On Your Face: Mercedes’ Marketplace Madness

Here Are Seven Unforgettable Cars That’ll Put A Smile On Your Face: Mercedes’ Marketplace Madness

Mmm 051724 Copy
ADVERTISEMENT

Welcome back to Mercedes’ Marketplace Madness! One of my favorite pastimes is searching for rare and weird vehicles for sale online. I’m always looking for something cool to look at and maybe buy, so I have a hilariously long list of vehicles just gathering virtual dust on my computer. I don’t always know what I’m looking for. Sometimes I find a Volkswagen Touareg V10 TDI and buy it, and sometimes I find a lightly-used Boeing 757, but that’s the beauty of the internet.

Mercedes’ Marketplace Madness cracks open a morsel of my search history to show you the vehicles I’ve been looking at, lately. Some of the vehicles are affordable, after all, I do try to buy some of them, while others are better fits for a collector like our Beau Boeckmann.

Vidframe Min Top
Vidframe Min Bottom

This week, I’ve decided to search for cars you don’t often see for sale if you’ve even seen any for sale at all. Not every car is going to be something you haven’t heard of, but let’s see if you know about what I’ve found!

1963 Goggomobil T300 – $5,422 – $7,049

Image (27)
Classic Car Auctions

We’re big fans of microcars at the Autopian. Not only are they so cute and so handy, but they’re an affordable gateway into classic car ownership, too. Goggomobil is a famous one and our friends at the Lane Motor Museum has the scoop on the Goggomobil T300:

Hans Glas and his son Andreas began producing scooters in their agricultural repair shop in Germany shortly after World War II. Their first product, the Goggo scooter, named for Hans’ youngest son, was an instant success as it met a demand for low-cost vehicles in the economically depressed country. This success helped pave the way for a line of Glas automobiles. Glas’ first prototype featured a front-opening door, like the BMW Isetta; however, it was replaced by conventional side-opening doors in 1955, when the first Goggomobil T250 was introduced. The Goggomobil T300, a model with a more powerful engine, began production the following year. The Goggomobil was well received in Germany as well as other European countries and even in the United States. The T300 came from New South Wales, Australia. The father and son team tried expanding their business, developing larger cars for an unfortunately unresponsive market. The company was sold to BMW in 1966; production of the Goggomobil continued until 1969.

I have good news and I have bad news. The good news is that you can bid on this sweet car in an auction lasting the next 18 days. The bad news is that if you win, you will have to figure out how to get the car from the Netherlands. But hey, the high-end auction estimate for this little car is just $7,049, so it’s not exactly an arm and a leg.

ADVERTISEMENT
Image (a28)
Classic Car Auctions

Classic Car Auctions says this example has been dormant for years, so you’ll have to revive the car once you get it over here. At least the car comes with export papers, so it’s ready to find a new home. Once you get the car running, you’ll get to experience the ravenous power of a 293cc twin-cylinder two-stroke making 15 HP bolted to a four-speed manual. Not fast, but fun! The Lane says you might be able to hit a top speed of 60 mph. However, with a power output so low, this is certainly dependent on whether you had lunch before taking a drive.

If that doesn’t deter you, head over to Classic Car Auctions to place a bid.

1994 Mitsubishi FTO GR – $9,000

436857288 8288230427870363 38415
Facebook Seller

Here’s an often-forgotten Japanese import. If you’re like me, you grew up driving the Mitsubishi FTO in video games. Now you can have one in real life! Here’s what Mitsubishi has to say:

The FTO sport coupe was launched in October 1994. Anteceded by the Galant FTO launched in 1971 as a younger brother of the Galant GTO, and as a younger brother of the GTO that debuted in 1990, the new FTO was developed as a model that gave ready access to sports car performance. A nimble coupe, the FTO was instantly identifiable as a sport model by its very, for a Mitsubishi Motors’ model, curved design and by its long deck, wide track and short wheelbase proportions. Front and rear overhangs were pared to the minimum and overall height was kept low to achieve superior driving dynamics and present a road-hugging appearance. Top trim levels used a 2.0 L V6 MIVEC engine that powered it to a “fastest machine in its sport car class” label at the time. This was mated to Mitsubishi Motors’ new INVECS-II Sport Mode automatic transmission that employed Learning Control feature to tailor gear shifting timing to the preferences and driving abilities of individual drivers. It also featured Japan’s first Sport Mode on a Japanese-built car allowing enthusiast drivers to shift up and down as if it was a manual gearbox. A car that delivered fun-to-drive qualities in abundance, the FTO was selected 1994-95 Japan Car of the Year.

437081010 8288230111203728 11055
Facebook Seller

This FTO is a GR model and it sports a 2.0-liter V6 making 168 HP. That reaches the front wheels through a five-speed manual. The seller says nothing about its condition, but the car looks to be in decent shape with the equivalent of 54,860 miles on its odometer.

It’s $9,000 from the seller in Grand Rapids, Michigan.

ADVERTISEMENT

2003 “ScootSki” – $3,300

Screenshot (1002)
Facebook Seller

Here’s one that would be in my collection today if it weren’t in Texas. Several years ago, some enthusiasts discovered a way to reuse all of those disposed of BRP Sea-Doos and Kawasaki Jet Skis littering Facebook Marketplace. Why not put a motorcycle underneath? Sure, the PWC will never float again, but you end up with a motorcycle or scooter producing more smiles per mile than perhaps any normal car.

While I could not find the first-ever “ScootSki,” I have found that people have been doing this since at least 2010. At least one guy even turned a stand-up PWC into a street-legal scooter! There are videos on how to make your own, but if that doesn’t sound like a project you want to take on, just buy one that already exists like this ScootSki in Texas.

432469967 8006741962672798 48350
Facebook Seller

Like many builds, this ScootSki combined a cheap Kawasaki Jet Ski hull with a cheap scooter. In this case, there’s a 2003 Jonway 250cc scooter underneath. Jonway, along with countless Chinese brands, used to make a clone of the Honda Reflex. The engine should be a 249cc water-cooled single attached to a CVT. The scooter should make something like 16 HP, which would have been good for about 75 mph in stock form.

The seller of this ScootSki doesn’t mention a top speed, but confusingly, says the scooter “runs almost over 60 mph really well.” The ScootSki has the proper lighting and mirrors to make it legal, plus an aftermarket coolant temp gauge in case the scooter underneath gets a bit hot with its new suit on.

It’s $3,300 from the seller in Sherman, Texas.

ADVERTISEMENT

1964 Chrysler New Yorker Town & Country – $36,000

Dsc 0792 Tiny 1200x0
Pcarmarket Seller

If you like your roofs long and your steel vintage, this might be one for you!

The Chrysler New Yorker enjoyed a long run. It was introduced in 1938 as the New York Special before becoming the New Yorker in 1939. Chrysler then kept the name alive in some way for decades until 1996. As Hemmings writes, K.T. Keller was at the helm of Chrysler and the climate wasn’t great. The Airflow, despite its forward-thinking, was a sales flop. One series launched in response was the C-23, which matched the Imperial with its 125-inch wheelbase. They also had some luxurious features for the era like an illuminated speedometer, a powered clock, and hydraulic brakes.

Dsc 0744 Tiny 2048x0
Pcarmarket Seller

The New Yorker grew to become Chrysler’s top mainline luxury model. New Yorkers designed under Virgil Exner enjoyed large fins, curvaceous taillights, and stunning pillarless doors. Elwood Engel became Chrysler’s design head in 1961 and took the firm’s cars in a different direction. The fins were left in the past and bodies became squared off with slab-sides.

This white over red example came from the factory with air-conditioning, power windows, power brakes, power steering, an electric clock, and more. Power comes from a 413 cubic inch Firepower V8 making 340 HP gross. Recent work includes an upgrade to fuel injection and an air-conditioning system overhaul.

It’s $36,000 or best offer from the seller in Montréal, Canada. The vehicle has 66,077 miles showing on a 5-digit odometer.

ADVERTISEMENT

1941 Studebaker M5 – $30,000

142686721
Hemmings Seller

Here’s a classic truck you won’t see every day if you even knew it existed!

Studebaker was founded as a wagon builder in 1852. The marque would expand into electric cars in 1902 before assembling gasoline cars in 1904. In those formative days, Studebaker had partners in the Garford Company and Everitt-Metzger-Flanders and sold their vehicles. Studebaker would finally start marketing its own cars in 1912. Its first commercial vehicle was a delivery car and between 1914 and 1915, the company began building trucks and buses.

As Hemmings writes, Studebaker was late to get into the lucrative truck market. Its first attempt came in 1937 when it made the car-based Coupe Express. That truck looked awesome and was even featured on a previous Mercedes’ Marketplace Madness, but didn’t really make Studebaker into a major truck player. Sales were poor, but Studebaker didn’t give up on the car-based pickup.

142686700
Hemmings Seller

Next came the Studebaker M5, which was based on Champion car, but was styled more like a truck. The truck kept the Champion’s dashboard and its 169.6 cubic inch L-head straight-six. That engine pumped out 80 HP to the rear wheels. To save on development costs, the running boards were the same on both sides of the truck and the fenders up front were the same as the fenders in the rear. Differences from the Champion include a leaf spring suspension and a straight front axle where the Champion had an independent front suspension.

Trucks were pretty basic in those days and options included a heater, radio, clock, windshield washers, and more. Yep, you didn’t even get to wash your windshield or heat yourself up in the standard truck. Even dual taillights were an option.

ADVERTISEMENT

This 1941 Studebaker M5 was restored in 2013 and still has its original drivetrain. It cost $660 new in 1941, or the equivalent of $14,676 today. The seller, Litchfield, Connecticut, wants $30,000 for the truck today.

1960 Fiat 1100 D – $8,000

435922153 2419572568250605 76835
Facebook Seller

Here’s a small Italian family car that’s oh so adorable.

Back in 1937, Fiat introduced a small family car known as the Fiat 508 C and the Balilla 1100, later renamed to just the 1100. It was refined for its day with an independent front suspension and an overhead valve engine. Fiat continued to sell this car after the end of World War II, but the company soon got to work on its replacement. That car would come in 1953 as the 1100.

435942305 2419572614917267 90520
Facebook Seller

This new car departed from the old pre-war car’s design by moving to a unibody construction from a body-on-frame construction. Reportedly, Fiat worked with America’s Budd Company on the body stampings, and by going to unibody, the new car benefited from an 11 percent weight loss from the previous generation. Yet, the new car was also slightly larger on the inside. The new 1100 also came just three years after Fiat’s first unibody car, the 1400. Reportedly, Fiat’s engineers worked on a V4 to go into this car, but fears of delays meant that the project got shelved.

This 1100 D is said to run and drive, but it needs some work to be perfect. Power comes from a 1.2-liter four making around 48 HP SAE and those ponies reach the rear wheels through a manual transmission.

ADVERTISEMENT

It’s $8,000 from the seller in Missouri City, Texas.

1969 Oldsmobile 442 Convertible – $39,999

139895332
Weisco Motorcars

Here’s a beloved classic car you probably do know about, but I want to feature it, anyway. Just picture yourself riding down Detroit’s Woodward Avenue with the top down in this bad boy.

As Mac’s Motor City Garage writes, the Oldsmobile 442 was introduced in 1964 in response to the smashing success of the then-new Pontiac GTO. The first 442s were packages applied to the F-85 and Cutlass. These featured tuned 330 cubic-inch V8s with 310 horsepower and a beefed-up suspension. Noteworthy was the name of the package. While Pontiac nabbed its name from Italy, the 442 described the vehicle’s build. That “442” translated to a four-barrel carburetor, a four-on-the-floor transmission, and a dual exhaust system. As the 442 was upgraded, it later came to mean a four-barrel carburetor, a 400 cubic-inch engine, and a dual exhaust.

139895369
Weisco Motorcars

However, observers in our audience will be quick to point out that later 442s had two-barrel carbs, single exhausts, and engines nowhere near 400 cubes. Eventually, 442 came to signify a performance version rather than anything specific. GM’s marketing was also sort of sloppy, as you’d see the vehicle stylized as “442,” “4-4-2,” or “4.4.2” depending on what ad you read.

This 1969 Oldsmobile 442 is not a numbers-matching ride, but it does look sweet. The seller says the engine under the hood is a 365 HP 455 cubic inch V8 from the 1970 442. Other modifications include Hooker headers, Edelbrock intake, Edelbrock carburetor, and MSD ignition.

ADVERTISEMENT

It’s $39,999 from Weisco Motorcars in Denver, Colorado with 80,222 miles on the odometer.

That’s it for this week, thank you for reading!

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on whatsapp
WhatsApp
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on reddit
Reddit
Subscribe
Notify of
33 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Torque
Torque
1 month ago

I mean yes though it is kind of like a scooter playing dress up, similar to the Fiata sports car, though maybe the Fiata wears it better?

Musicman27
Musicman27
1 month ago

“Seven Unforgetable Cars” *slips in a Motorcycle Jetski*

SurvivedAPintoCrash
SurvivedAPintoCrash
1 month ago

So the Goggomobile started as a scooter, same as the new Microlino!

TOSSABL
TOSSABL
1 month ago

Several decades back, a semi-retired farmer customer of mine still used his old Studebaker pickup as his goin’ ta town rig. Contrary to what one would expect from a depression-era farmer, he kept it in nice shape, and it always gave me a smile seeing him idle by at 25 mph leading a little parade of impatient drivers

Joe The Drummer
Joe The Drummer
1 month ago
Reply to  TOSSABL

“Goin’ ta town rig”? I see you, fellow VGG fan.

But him keeping his truck in good shape isn’t at all “contrary” to what I would expect – in my experience, the Depression-era mindset is, “I may never afford another one, so this one has to last.”

My grandma, born absolutely dirt poor in rural Alabama in 1918, drove the same 1973 Delta 88 all my life – not a cheap car, and quite a luxury for a country girl like her. Still, though my grandparents weren’t rich, they were secure enough that she could have traded cars at least a few times if she wanted, and my very traditional grandpa would have given his wife whatever she wanted. But she still owned it in 2007 when she died, and other than some deteriorated interior materials and split seams in the upholstery (understandable for 70s GM) and a few unfortunate dings from her driving later in life than she should have (understandable for a proud, stubborn old lady), it was in fantastic shape. The Rocket 455 was silky-smooth and fired up on the first turn of the key, it rode like a flying carpet, and the A/C blew cold enough to correct global warming.

So of course the old man’s truck was well kept. He was like my grandma.

Freelivin2713
Freelivin2713
1 month ago

These are all great and interesting vehicles that have personality! I smiled at all of them…wonderful selection

Joe The Drummer
Joe The Drummer
1 month ago

I could be a very happy man with that Studebaker truck and that droptop 442 parked under my carport. And the ScootSki just looks like ridiculous stupid fun that I am completely here for. College-age me might have wanted to drive it straight through the middle of a golf course, across a water hazard pond, and out the other side. Nowadays I would just want to watch a video of someone doing that.

Last edited 1 month ago by Joe The Drummer
Church
Church
1 month ago

Wow. What a haul this week. I am honestly not sure which one I would choose to purchase.

Gubbin
Gubbin
1 month ago

That Fiat is darling and could be fun for occasional grocery runs but the DIY dashboard and the seller’s comment comment that “it’s only good for show car so keep in mind” give me pause.

Freelivin2713
Freelivin2713
1 month ago
Reply to  Gubbin

Yeah, notice the metal piece (short fan blade or decorative metal?) hooked to the turn signal indicator w/ a hose clamp; and the cheap plastic cup/coin holder

TOSSABL
TOSSABL
1 month ago
Reply to  Freelivin2713

That little turn signal flourish is what caught my eye: I didn’t even see the modern gauges

DONALD FOLEY
DONALD FOLEY
1 month ago

Peter and Marlotte Backhaus, a couple from Germany, set out to travel around the world in their “Goggo.” Their account of the adventure was published as a book in 1957 and fascinating documentary film in 1964, Im Goggomobil um die Welt.

DialMforMiata
DialMforMiata
1 month ago

Random observations:

  1. I can already smell the oil leaking from the V6 in that FTO.
  2. The surfboards on that New Yorker wagon are a bit incongruous for Montreal, non?
  3. That Fiat 1100 is making me feel things. 50s Italian design is the best design.
  4. “Off-brand” pickups of this Stude’s era are so much more interesting than Fords or Chevies. Hudson in particular made some really handsome ones.
Joe The Drummer
Joe The Drummer
1 month ago
Reply to  DialMforMiata

I found out that Studebaker made pickup trucks by spotting my first one for sale in a parking lot. I was going to a store in a little strip mall, and I see this cool old truck with a for sale sign in the window out by the road. I made a mental note that I wanted to check it out on my way out. I didn’t recognize it. Then when I came out of the store, I saw the “STUDEBAKER” stamping on the tailgate. Wait, what? They did trucks?

Studebaker was a seriously cool marque that was a sad loss for American motoring. Nobody but them could have ever made anything that looked like the Golden Hawk.
https://assets.rebelmouse.io/media-library/image.jpg?id=30864271&width=1200&height=800&quality=90&coordinates=46%2C0%2C46%2C0

DONALD FOLEY
DONALD FOLEY
1 month ago

Is that Chrysler New Yorker, located in Quebec, priced in US or Candian dollars?

Hamish48
Hamish48
1 month ago

I would love to hear Adrian Clark’s view of the New Yorker wagon

Bongo Friendee Harvey Park
Bongo Friendee Harvey Park
1 month ago
Reply to  Hamish48

Watch our or you’ll end up on The List.

TOSSABL
TOSSABL
1 month ago

I rather think that being on The List is a badge of honor for some 😉

10001010
10001010
1 month ago

I’ve been intrigued by the FTO since Jackie Chan jumped one onto a boat (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U4QZGLblYYE) but today I’d put my money on that Chrysler, I’m a sucker for wagons.

Boulevard_Yachtsman
Boulevard_Yachtsman
1 month ago

I’ll take that Grand Wagon-master, Yorker of New, Small City and Rural Space. Or whatever it was called, just give me the big ‘ol long-roof.

Mr. Canoehead
Mr. Canoehead
1 month ago

A friend of mine in high school had a 442 just like this one, but green. His dad bought it for him, I was pretty envious. His was an automatic with a 400/4BBL, so it matched the 400 cu in, 4 BBL, dual exhaust definition. He used to tell some story about how it was awarded to Miss Hawaii in 1969 but nobody believed him.

MATTinMKE
MATTinMKE
1 month ago

That Olds is a lovely shade of red.

ProfPlum
ProfPlum
1 month ago

While I like the coupe better than the convertible, the ’69 Olds 442 is one of my favorites. The ’69 Cutlass is one of the nicest-looking cars GM made at that time.

Jonee Eisen
Jonee Eisen
1 month ago

Goggomobils with that 300cc motor are pretty rare. That was the intermediate-sized engine slotted between the 250 and 400 and it pretty much served no purpose. 250cc’s and under gave you a tax break and you didn’t need a “real” driver’s license to drive one in Germany. Sort of like sans-permis cars in France. So there was no need to buy the 300 unless you thought that 20 horsepower was way too overpowered, but 13 was too little. 15 was apparently a sweet spot for a very small number of people. Here in America we only got the 400, of course.

Misplaced Aussie
Misplaced Aussie
1 month ago
Reply to  Jonee Eisen

well known in Oz from an old commercial for yellow pages https://youtu.be/2KCOd6Yt7dE?si=O39_uPvfnGhZlBvG

Torque
Torque
1 month ago

“It’s a wee rippa!…” love this

Rad Barchetta
Rad Barchetta
1 month ago

Che bella quella Fiat!

Squirrelmaster
Squirrelmaster
1 month ago

As much as I love the 442, which is a lot, I think I’d prefer the Studebaker truck.

Also, is it just me, or did the FTO not age nearly as well as some of its contemporaries?

Vic Vinegar
Vic Vinegar
1 month ago
Reply to  Squirrelmaster

The wheels on that FTO don’t help anything. A lot of these JDM cars I see for sale in the US seem to be the kind of used car you’d avoid if you saw a USDM Integra outfitted the same way.

Squirrelmaster
Squirrelmaster
1 month ago
Reply to  Vic Vinegar

That’s a good point, as those wheels do it absolutely no favors. I think the general design hasn’t aged super well since several vehicles have come along in the intervening years that poorly tried to borrow the design. Sadly, these days the FTO looks like the love child of an FD RX7 and the Hyundai Tiburon.

Bongo Friendee Harvey Park
Bongo Friendee Harvey Park
1 month ago
Reply to  Squirrelmaster

It’s you. That FTO is fire.

Gilbert Wham
Gilbert Wham
1 month ago
Reply to  Squirrelmaster

I don’t think I’ve even seen an FTO since the noughties. I regularly see a few Celicas and Shupras kicking about round here, as well as an absolutely cherry Nissan 200sx, but I genuinely cannot remember the last time I saw an FTO.

Last edited 1 month ago by Gilbert Wham
Torque
Torque
1 month ago
Reply to  Squirrelmaster

The exterior design kind of reminds me of an early 2000s Masarati Coupe

33
0
Would love your thoughts, please comment.x
()
x