Home » Here’s How Far My 134,000 Mile BMW i3 Drove On A Single Charge Of Its New Battery

Here’s How Far My 134,000 Mile BMW i3 Drove On A Single Charge Of Its New Battery

David Electric Adventure Post
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My 134,000 mile BMW i3 had only 48 miles of estimated range when I first test-drove it. “Oh boy, I think the battery is toast” I worried before asking the BMW dealer to do a battery health check. He refused. “You’ll have to buy it first or someone else will probably snag it. Only then will we check the battery,” the dealer told me. I took the risk, and the battery ended up being toast. Sadly, BMW’s battery warranty is just eight years, 100,000 miles; my new i3 is nine years old with 134,000 on the clock. So I was screwed; or so I thought.

If you’ve been following my i3 saga — my very first foray into the world of electric cars, and one that involved me, a man who tends to buy old Jeeps, falling in love with a little carbon-fiber car with an incredibly beautiful interior — then you know that the California Air Resources Board saved my ass. Specifically, it did so via this rule, which oddly only applies only to plug-in hybrids/PZEVs, and not to fully electric cars:

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My i3 is equipped with a “Rex,” or “range extender.” It’s a little two-cylinder, 650cc gasoline motor built by Taiwanese company Kymco and normally found in a BMW C650 GT scooter. With the car’s 1.9-gallon tank, the engine is there to help you get to a charging station once you’ve driven all 72 miles of EPA-estimated all-electric distance. In my case, the motor had an even more important role: It made me eligible for California’s 10 year, 150,000 miles warranty, which the dealer honored.

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The EPA’s rating is 72 miles of electric-only range.

I will say I was skeptical at first. The dealer had initially told me it would take six to eight weeks for the new battery to show up from Bavaria, then it called me 10 days later to say the job was done. After my first, rather tame drive saw the car going 86.2 miles, I was convinced the battery had been replaced; but I have lots of questions still: Is this battery the same as the one that originally came in 2014 i3s? Is Samsung still making the same, older pouch cells? Are my batteries brand new or have they been reconditioned in some way? Surely they haven’t been sitting in a warehouse since 2014.

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I likely won’t ever know the answer to these questions, but what I can do is test the battery and see the maximum number of miles it can propel my i3 on a single charge. So that’s what I did.

I’m not sure “hypermiling” is technically the right term here, in that I didn’t try to draft behind vehicles on the freeway, I didn’t tape up certain features or pump my tires up to a high PSI, and I didn’t focus hard on steady-state cruising. Plus, I did take a drive through a canyon road, which didn’t help things; also, the temperature was pretty high on day two, and then you could argue that spreading this across two days wasn’t great since on day two the battery had to condition itself for a second time to maximize its efficiency. But nevermind all that: This test is me driving as carefully as possible to maximize range from this mystery battery that a BMW dealer chucked into my i3 thanks to California’s consumer protection rules.

Driving with efficiency in mind in an EV is a little different than doing so in a gas car; gas cars love highways — their engine speeds are steady and low in high gear, they’re going a long distance over a short period of time, and they’re not wasting gas idling while not moving. EVs are oftentimes not most efficient on the highway; it takes a bit of time to get used to the fact that your most efficient route may be your most miserable one: traffic.

I kind of like this, since with a gas car your misery sitting in gridlock is joined by more misery at the fuel pump, whereas in an EV you can at least enjoy a little efficiency win while laying on your horn on the 405. And it makes sense why EVs do so well in town and so poorly on the freeway: Electric cars don’t have to idle, since their motors make lots of torque even when not rotating. I’m sure you’ve all heard that in car reviews before: “EVs make max torque at zero RPM.” But what does that mean? Well, it means that when that motor isn’t spinning at all, it can create a bunch of rotational force (this is technically not the right term, but for the layperson, that’s a good way to think of torque); imagine grabbing an electric motor and stopping it. Maybe you have a remote control car, you pick it up, and turn it on — imagine taking those spinning wheels and stopping them so they cannot rotate. You feel that force your fingers? Those wheels twisting your skin a bit as they try to rotate? That’s what it means by “electric motors make torque at zero RPM.” Your remote control car’s motor is not spinning — it’s at zero RPM – but you can feel that it’s making torque, trying to spin.

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A gasoline car, at zero RPM, makes essentially zero torque. I say “essentially” because the starter motor does temporarily create torque in order to rotate the engine up to an RPM that allows its pistons to squeeze are (build compression) just enough to facilitate combustion, which pushes a piston down and gets the car idling to the point where the starter is no longer needed. Most modern cars do shut their engines off in the city, and use beefed-up starter motors to turn them on just before you need to take off from a light, but many have to sit at stop lights and idle — burning gas to travel no distance whatsoever. It’s pure waste, and electric cars don’t have to do it. At a stop light, an EV is using as much electricity as it would be while off, plus whatever is needed to run accessories and maybe your AC.

What’s more, in city driving, you’re often on your brakes. In a gas car, brakes are literally a mechanism that turns your car’s kinetic energy into friction/heat. That’s literally their job. In an EV, and especially in my i3, letting off the accelerator pedal slows the car down dramatically, but this deceleration isn’t a production of friction braking, it’s actually the resistance associated with the electric motor acting as a generator to recharge your batteries.

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So in the city, EVs don’t idle, and they leverage stopping at lights to recharge the battery. What about on the highway? Well, on the highway, they deal with a lot of the same challenges as an ICE car — rolling resistance, aerodynamics, bearing friction, powertrain inefficiencies, etc. But the biggest one of all challenges is that second one: aerodynamic drag, which follows the equation: Drag equals one half times air density times velocity squared times drag coefficient times frontal area.

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Notice that the velocity is a squared term, meaning your drag goes up with the square of your speed. So imagine going from 25 mph in the city to 75 on the highway — you’ve tripled your velocity, so your drag has gone up nine-fold! Just intuitively, you can imagine pushing a big car at 5 or 10 mph — maybe you’ve had to do so while trying to give someone a roll-start in their old VW Bus. That’s not too hard, right? Especially with the i3’s reasonably light weight and skinny tires, that motor isn’t doing much pushing the little carbon fiber car down the street at low speeds. Now imagine pushing that same car, but with a 75 mph wind gust blowing against you — that’s the same thing that the car has to deal with on the highway. It’s quite a lot harder to propel that car forward, and thus, it’s why the i3 tends to fall on its face when traveling at high speeds. (There are also implications associated with motor gearing, but that’s really less important here).

For these reasons, I kept the i3 in town. Obviously, because regenerative braking isn’t perfectly efficient, stop-and-go traffic is still less optimal than steady-state cruising at low speeds, and high temperatures are less optimal than low ones since the car’s active thermal management will have to work harder to keep the cells where they want to be (which is about the same temperature as humans — speaking of, all of us in the car were boiling when driving in the valley). Still, this was a good test of the i3’s capability.

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The trip began with the i3’s Guess-O-Meter estimating a range of 98 miles in Eco Pro + mode, which dulls the car’s acceleration, limits its top speed to 56 MPH, and shuts off access to air conditioning or heated seats.

Somehow, I convinced my two friends Jeb and Giulia to join me on this rather hot adventure; I even put down towels so they wouldn’t sweat on my i3’s wool seats, which are extremely hard to clean. Notice how, after driving just 14 miles in the city, the computer recalculated its expected range: It expected the car to manage another 96 miles, for a total of 110 miles!

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The range estimates on the Guess-O-Meter moved around a lot, as the car recalculated how it expected me to drive based on my pedal inputs. Going up a steep grade made it think I was going to continue driving like a jack-hole, so it dropped the range estimate. Coming back down the steep grade made it think I was going to keep driving like a grandpa, so the range estimate went up. The highest total range estimate we saw was 113 miles. My goal was to hit 100, so this seemed like decent margin.

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I drove Jeb and Giulia around the valley a bit, then to Santa Monica on the coast, where, mercifully (especially for Giulia, who has no window to roll down — that’s right, the i3’s rears don’t go down!), the temperatures dropped.

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From Santa Monica, I headed to Topanga Canyon, which maybe wasn’t the most efficient move, but I was careful. The i3 was a lot of fun to throw around turns; its tire are skinny, but it’s a lightweight(ish) car, and a BMW:

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Eventually, as the distance climbed, and we entered our fourth hour trying to exhaust the i3’s battery (something that would have been very quick to do if it’s maximum efficiency occurred on the highway) our GoPro batteries started to die, as Chris — Galpin’s incredibly talented director — is explaining below:

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Darkness fell, which gave us all a break from the terror of that bright yellow ball in the sky, but now I was running late for a commitment I had made, and Chris was growing tired, too. This was a Friday night; the weekend had begun, and we were driving around in traffic for hours on end with dying GoPro batteries and full memory cards!

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Jeb and Giulia were kind and patient, Chris and I were the former but less so the latter. Here’s me pointing out how the expected mileage left increased from 37 to 38 while just sitting at a stop light. This was maddening:

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Eventually, it was 8 P.M., I was in a bit of hot water regarding my commitment, and Chris was done. So he and talented cameraman Carlo both ditched us. Here they are speeding away, disgusted by the longevity of my BMW i3’s battery:

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Jeb, Giulia, and I met up with the person to whom I’d made my commitment, and after apologizing, we had dinner. Then we went home, and I continued testing the following morning, when it was really, really hot near my Studio City Apartment:

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As you can see, I started the day having put 89 miles on the battery pack — well above the EPA-rated 72 miles! But I wanted to hit 100, and with only 13 miles on the Guess-O-Meter, I all of a sudden had almost no margin.

So I drove slowly on my way to an EV car show at California State University at Northridge. It was 16 miles away, so I wasn’t expecting to make that. But 100 miles? Surely, right? I mean, the Guess-O-Meter had told me 113 at one point, and was regularly estimating over 105 pretty much all the previous day! Now I had an estimated 102 miles of overall range, and yet, no matter how slowly and carefully I drove, the estimated remaining range seemed to drop more quickly than the miles traveled rose.

My heart started beating fast. “Come on. How?! We had this!” I exclaimed, lightly pressing on the rightmost pedal with my big toe. “100 Miles was in the bag!” No matter what, every mile I drove took more than a mile away from the Guess-O-Meters range estimate. I tried slowing down, but nothing changed! Then my range dropped to four miles after having driven 95.8 miles. That’s a total of 99.8 miles. “No!!!” I continued exclaiming while staring at the Guess-O-Meter like a hawk. Then it happened:

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The estimated remaining range dropped from four miles to zero. And in short order: “Popopopopopopo” the gasoline range-extender under my rear floor fired up. The test was over:

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I’d driven 96.7 miles, or 24.7 miles more than the EPA’s rated all-electric range, and 10 miles more than I’d gotten out the battery in my previous test. Though I didn’t hit my target, it was a clear indicator that my battery was healthy, and that indeed, paying just $10,500 for this high-mileage i3 with a beautiful interior was the deal of the century. All thanks to one California emissions/consumer-protection law.

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EV Mastermind
EV Mastermind
6 months ago

My 2014 i3 Rex has 79k miles and shows 12.8 kwh batt kapa max on the hidden display. I am thinking about taking it to the San Diego BMW dealership for a battery test. Do you think it will fail? I hate to have to pay for the diagnostic fee.

Scott
Scott
11 months ago

David, I’m still shopping for an early i3 in/around LA, so may I ask?

Am I correct in my understanding that normally, an i3 battery is warrantied for eight years?

But an i3 with a REX falls under a different, California-specific (CARB) rule that makes the battery covered by the manufacturer for ten years?

So: a regular i3 (without the gas range extender) more than eight years old is now out of warranty, whereas a i3 REX will have its battery covered (if it meets BMWs rules about degradation) for ten years?

Is that how it works?

Also, do happen to know if they measure the warranty dates from date of purchase or the date of manufacture?

Thanks very much! 🙂

Manwich Sandwich
Manwich Sandwich
11 months ago

Somehow, I convinced my two friends Jeb and Giulia”

Quick question… how does your friend Giulia stack up in terms of reliability compared to the Alfa Romeo Giulia?

Archie Goodwin
Archie Goodwin
11 months ago

Thank you for the information. I bought an i3 end of last year and also love its very light gray interior. I too was disappointed by the dealer’s lack of accommodation during the purchase. Even though I had made an appointment the cheerful salesperson had just started with another customer and offered to work with both of us simultaneously. There was no time for a test drive so I just walked around and agreed to buy the car for cash (a reduction of $14,000 after 3 years). After waiting 30 minutes, I was summoned to a private office with a financial officer to sign documents. Despite paying cash the f.o. had to verify my credit rating and then offer me window tinting, clear wrap, and extended warranty. After I declined the extras three times I was allowed to leave the room. Then when I said good bye to the salesperson he said, “I want you to know we made around ten cents on your sale.” I hope I never have to visit a car dealership again.

Cayde-6
Cayde-6
11 months ago
Reply to  Archie Goodwin

Seems like dealerships are feeling the same price pressure as airlines. Internet price comparison tools are forcing them to reduce upfront price with the hopes of making the profit on the back end with services and extra fees

Gregory A Duncan
Gregory A Duncan
11 months ago

We are never doing away with petroleum but I prefer Toyota hybrid. Electric is either on with all it’s power or off with none. The best mileage comes gunning from red light and hit brakes hard at the light to recharge the battery. You use electric more than gas then. Getting a vehicle moving is where the most gas is used in a regular car.

D.B. Platypus
D.B. Platypus
11 months ago

Great video. Did NOT need to see DT’s nippers, though.

D.B. Platypus
D.B. Platypus
11 months ago
Reply to  D.B. Platypus

Autocorrect fail, but you know what? I’m leaving it.

NosrednaNod
NosrednaNod
11 months ago

Motorcycle engine, motorcycle tires.

Bendanzig
Bendanzig
11 months ago

I guess I am a little late to the discussion, but I don’t understand why it took so long to drive 89 miles before Chris and Carlos had to throw in the towel. Even if you toodled around at an average of 35 miles per hour, you would have gotten done within 2.5 hours and probably wouldn’t have been late to your “commitment”. Was there a long stroll on the beach in Santa Monica or is driving in LA so bad that you are sitting most of the time?

Cayde-6
Cayde-6
11 months ago
Reply to  Bendanzig

Tell me you’ve never been to SoCal without actually saying you’ve never been to SoCal.

DRFS Rich
DRFS Rich
11 months ago

I didn’t look closely at pictures but instead choose to imagine you loaded the former Governor of Florida and an Alfa Romeo (probably on fire) into the i3 for this trip.

Timohb
Timohb
11 months ago

Please lead with the headline. I already read all the previous articles. Thank you.

Frankencamry
Frankencamry
11 months ago
Reply to  Timohb

Yeah, someone should teach David how to link past articles rather than retype them or stop paying him by the word.

I’m starting to feel less bad about scrolling past big chunks of his articles to find the new info.

Yukonelele
Yukonelele
11 months ago
Reply to  Frankencamry

I was actually thinking of making a similar comment today. David Tracy, why do you start your articles by rewriting previous articles? Please stop doing this and change nothing else! Thank you and good day!

Peter d
Peter d
11 months ago

David,

Thank you for ruining my morning’s productivity – looks like you are doing well with the i3, and like others have suggested, it seems likely that BMW installed a larger battery than this car originally had installed.

One thing I would like to suggest, though, is that you further embrace your new electricity-driven lifestyle and get an electric tea kettle for your home. Not only will the new ones heat the water faster than you think should be possible, they use less energy doing it and do not put pollution into your living space. Since you are in an apartment and therefore are unlikely to be able to switch to an induction stove, the tea kettle is probably your next best option for electric kitchen improvement. I happen to have the fancy Cusinart version with multiple temperature setting (https://www.cuisinart.com/shopping/appliances/tea_kettles/cpk-17p1/) but there are lots of options out there – plenty to choose from.

Frankencamry
Frankencamry
11 months ago
Reply to  Peter d

Good heavens, $100? The Hamilton Beach with selectable temps felt extravagant when I bought it, and it was on sale for $35.

Iain Tunmore
Iain Tunmore
11 months ago
Reply to  Peter d

I only recently learned electric kettles aren’t ubiquitous in the US, which seems wild to me as a Brit, here EVERY house has one.

When you move house and everything is in boxes, the two things you keep unpacked, for immediate access, are a toilet roll and the kettle.

When a house is having building works done and is gutted completely, there’ll be one live socket, with a kettle.

This might be THE biggest difference between America and the UK.

Cayde-6
Cayde-6
11 months ago
Reply to  Peter d

Sorry, but induction is f***ing terrible.

Harris K Telemacher
Harris K Telemacher
11 months ago

I’m guessing Jeb and Giulia are not your friends any longer. Or, at least if they’re smart, they shouldn’t be.

A. Barth
A. Barth
11 months ago

Giulia is clearly the Alfa of the group.

Manwich Sandwich
Manwich Sandwich
11 months ago
Reply to  A. Barth

And she’s about to get a lot less reliable…

Brau Beaton
Brau Beaton
11 months ago

Well done, but “deal of the century” at $10,500? Can’t buy that. That money can buy you a very nice (ICE) car that will last decades, well beyond the life of the i3’s new battery. You’ll need a new battery in about 100,000 miles, or five years as I drive.

Skurdnee
Skurdnee
11 months ago
Reply to  Brau Beaton

vehicles listed at $10,500 near me:

  • 2017 Equinox with a rebuilt title and 67k miles
  • 2017 Cruze with a rebuilt title and 78k miles
  • 2018 Elantra with a rebuilt title and 65k miles
  • 2017 Mirage with a rebuilt title and 19k miles
  • 2007 IS350 with 78k miles

I’d take an i3 with a new battery over any of these (other than the Lexus, but that’s still 16 years old)

Phantom Pedal Syndrome
Phantom Pedal Syndrome
11 months ago

The big story here for me is that the rear windows don’t roll down, at all.
So.. BMW was mimicking malaise era GM nearly ten years ago? Why does that not surprise me?
(Your getting cocky BMW)

“If there’s room for rear passengers said passengers should be in control of opening or closing some sort of window.”
(I read that in a Geneva Conventions pamphlet somewhere)

I get it that there might not be room in the door cavity for the windows to roll down back there, but c’mon.
Can we get a hinge up top and a latch at the bottom?
Malaise era GM gave us that at least.

I’ll bet the idea came up during the design, but marketing or penny pinchers squashed it.

BMW has an image to uphold.
I’m not sure what that image is anymore though.

It used to be “classy”.
Some latches on the rear windows would have been classy.

BMW doesn’t care about us anymore.

Cryptoenologist
Cryptoenologist
11 months ago

Counterpoint: how many two door or 2.5 door vehicles have rear windows that can be opened?

Phantom Pedal Syndrome
Phantom Pedal Syndrome
11 months ago

Not enough.
That’s not a good excuse.
My 2 door Ranger has them and there’s nothing but jump seats back there.

Last edited 11 months ago by Phantom Pedal Syndrome
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