Home » Holy Crap, The 2025 Honda Civic Hybrid Is Expensive

Holy Crap, The 2025 Honda Civic Hybrid Is Expensive

2025 Honda Civic Sedan Sport Hybrid Ts
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The 2025 Honda Civic Hybrid rolls into American showrooms today, and it’s likely to be both economical and an extraordinarily pleasant car to live with. However, if you’re looking for a truly cheap and cheerful hybrid sedan, the Honda Civic Hybrid might not be your first choice because it starts at more than what a loaded Corolla Hybrid costs.

To get into the lowest-cost 2025 Honda Civic Hybrid, you’re looking at the Sport Hybrid trim, which retails for $29,845 including freight. While that does include some lovely creature comforts like dual-zone automatic climate control, a moonroof, and heated front seats, that’s still a substantially more expensive entry point compared to the competition.

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For example, if you want a high-spec Corolla Hybrid, like the XLE trim with leatherette, a moonroof, heated seats, and wireless smartphone charging, you’ll be looking at a sticker price of $28,345 including freight, or $1,500 less than the entry point for a Civic Hybrid. Even if you add the $600 JBL audio system, you can still have a nice vacation for the difference in price between the Corolla and the Civic.

 

Honda Civic Hybrid Sport

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OK with fewer features? No problem, the Corolla Hybrid range goes all the way down to the $24,595 LE trim. While fairly basic, it includes wireless Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, power windows, single-zone automatic climate control, LED headlights, and sensible 16-inch wheels with reasonably priced tires. In this end of the market, many consumers are looking for affordable transportation rather than premium aspirations, so a $24,595 relatively basic hybrid sedan holds huge appeal, as does a sporty SE trim in-between the LE and XLE and the option of all-wheel-drive.

Toyota Colrolla Hybrid Se

 

Of course, the Corolla Hybrid isn’t the only competitor to the Honda Civic Hybrid. Hyundai will sell you a brand new Elantra Hybrid for as little as $27,400 including freight, and while that trim doesn’t include heated seats or a moonroof, it does include a 10.25-inch touchscreen infotainment system with navigation, dual-zone automatic climate control, blind spot monitoring, and a surprisingly handy hands-free proximity-based trunk release. That’s not a bad tradeoff at all considering savings of $2,445 over the cheapest Civic Hybrid.
Hyundai Elantra Hybrid

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Alright, so the Civic Hybrid does have more power than either the Corolla or the Elantra, but fuel economy — the figure that really matters — isn’t a decisive win for Honda. The Civic is rated at 51 mpg city, 47 mpg highway, and 49 mpg combined, the Corolla Hybrid XLE is rated at 53 mpg city, 46 mpg highway, and 50 mpg combined, and the Hyundai Elantra Hybrid is rated at 51 mpg city, 58 mpg highway, and 54 mpg combined.

Honda Civic Hybrid Sport Touring2

 

Hang on, if the 2025 Honda Civic Hybrid starts at $29,845, where does it go from there? That would be the Sport Touring Hybrid trim, which stickers for $32,845 including freight. It adds new wheels, Google built-in, leather seating, a 12-speaker Bose sound system, a nine-inch touchscreen with wireless Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, and a wireless smartphone charger, but that doesn’t seem like an overwhelming amount of equipment for a $32,845 compact car, especially when the loaded $30,600 Elantra Hybrid Limited adds the luxury of ventilated seats.

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Honda Civic Hybrid Sport Touring

 

Will the 2025 Honda Civic Hybrid be good? Probably. We already like the refinement and upscale materials inside the outgoing Civic, and the hybrid system in the current Accord impressed us. At the same time, we recognize that people looking for an entry-level hybrid vehicle are often shopping value. No matter how you slice it, $29,845 is a lot of money, and Honda would do well to offer the hybrid powertrain in less expensive trims.

(Photo credits: Honda, Toyota, Hyundai)

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Bob Boxbody
Bob Boxbody
1 month ago

I’m a fan of Honda and Toyota, but in this case, ventilated seats would certainly make me glance in the Hyundai’s direction.

Dodsworth
Dodsworth
1 month ago

Just getting rid of the sunroof would save about $1200.

Felix Tannenbaum
Felix Tannenbaum
1 month ago

the current civic is one of the best looking cars honda has made in some time, but the addition of the ant-eater snout is bad bad bad.

sad. 🙁

Myk El
Myk El
1 month ago

I was a bit disappointed there isn’t a more basic trim on the Civic Hybrid. I very much want a hatchback and a hybrid as the next car. So I’m probably cross-shopping with the Prius. I hate that I can’t get the hybrid without a roof that opens. I intentionally got it with one car. Realized I didn’t use the feature much, but other creature comforts only seem to come on the trim with the opening roof. Not just a Honda thing. I know the fewer variations supposedly keeps costs low, but it does annoy.

MAX FRESH OFF
MAX FRESH OFF
1 month ago

Comparing the Hybrid to the Si: same HP, more torque, available hatchback, better MPG, has a lower MSRP (and probably won’t have as much ADM/TruCoat dealer add ons).

Bob Boxbody
Bob Boxbody
1 month ago
Reply to  MAX FRESH OFF

I haven’t seen if this hybrid will have an LSD; that and the gearbox are what make the Si fun. It’s not about the power.

Shinynugget
Shinynugget
1 month ago

I’m going to defend the Corolla a little, at least the version I own. I bought a 2021 Corolla Hatchback SE 6MT a little over two years ago. Yes it is good basic transportation. But it is certainly not a penalty box. I’ve been in the current gen Civic and while I think the interior design is better looking, the materials are very comparable. Feature for feature they are very similar as well. The entry level models depart on their engines though. The base engine for the Civic is way under powered at 158hp and 138lb-ft of torque. The Corolla has 169hp and 151lb-ft of torque. The Toyota CVT has a mechanical ‘launch’ gear and makes a huge difference in how the car drives. With a manual though, the Corolla is the epitome of having fun driving a slow car fast. I haven’t driven the base Civic with a manual but I can tell you the Honda CVT with that anemic engine is a SNOOZE.
Now credit to Honda, the turbo version of the Civic engine is WAY better than the Corolla. And you can get a manual still in 3 of the 4 hatchback trims. But now you are at the Sport Touring level which is a good $7K more than the entry model. For that money I would totally get the Civic Si with the 200hp engine. Boo to Toyota for killing the manual Corolla Hatchback.

These ‘entry’ level cars today have features only available on high end cars not that long ago. I’m a Gen-Xer so I remember cars that didn’t even have A/C or FM radios standard. Even economy cars today are luxurious by comparison.
My Corolla SE has leather steering wheel, lane keep assist, radar cruise, 6 speaker stereo, Apple Carplay/Android Auto, Auto Climate control, Proximity Key/Push Start, ABS, Power Windows w/one touch open close, power locks, power mirrors, tons of airbags and good crash ratings from IIHS. I’ve taken it on long roads trips and the noise levels are more than acceptable, while getting 40+ MPG. You can call the Corolla basic, but it has everything I need and want out of a car.
Now excuse me while I take my wife’s MDX to dinner tonight. 🙂

MaximillianMeen
MaximillianMeen
1 month ago

Even if you add the $600 JBL audio system, you can still have a nice vacation for the difference in price between the Corolla and the Civic.

Damn, Thomas, where are you going for vacation on $900? That barely covers a single domestic round-trip flight plus 1 night in a hotel. I think you and I have different definitions of a nice vacation.

Cameron Showers
Cameron Showers
1 month ago

Honestly driving my Corolla to Florida from where i live and a fairly inexpensive airbnb for a few days I’m able to make that 900 into a pretty decent trip. But it totally depends on where you’re from for sure.

Jj
Jj
1 month ago

Thanks, I thought the same thing. It’s going to cost me $160/day to board my dogs when I go away this fall.

Younork
Younork
1 month ago
Reply to  Jj

Take the dogs on the vacation?

Mr. Fusion
Mr. Fusion
1 month ago

Personally I would never cross-shop the Civic and the Corolla. Although they started out as direct competitors, I feel like that is not where they have ended up. Toyota is still aiming for basic, affordable transportation, and they give you the driving experience, interior, and NVH to match. Honda is aiming for a more premium, enjoyable experience. I see the price difference as appropriate.

Some people have said that maybe the Prius is a better comparison in terms of price/features, but even the Prius is still a more “tinny”-feeling car compared to the Civic.

But maybe I am the wrong person to be making this comparison, since the only reason I would consider the Civic in the first place is because they offer a hatchback.

Ross Fuller
Ross Fuller
1 month ago
Reply to  Mr. Fusion

so my ex had the 10th gen sport touring, and my brother has the 11th gen si; agree that they are nicer than corolla, but not about nvh thing.

civics have barely any sound insulation (main reason why they are so lightweight), these things can be downright *loud* depending on road surface.

Mr. Fusion
Mr. Fusion
1 month ago
Reply to  Ross Fuller

Yeah, you’re right that Hondas have a decades-long reputation for road noise. The article did not mention it, but the 2025 Civics have active noise cancellation for the first time. What took them so long? And what does Honda have against noise isolation anyway?

Steve P
Steve P
1 month ago
Reply to  Ross Fuller

Several YouTube folks doing test drives today noted that this model uses different tires that are much quieter. YMMV.

Epochellipse
Epochellipse
1 month ago
Reply to  Steve P

From what I’ve read the tires are quieter because of resonator inserts clipped into the wheels. I expect other makers to quickly adopt them, but obviously not in time for 2025 models.

Steve P
Steve P
1 month ago
Reply to  Epochellipse

That figures. These folks are more influencers than serious car critics.

Epochellipse
Epochellipse
1 month ago
Reply to  Mr. Fusion

If you’re the wrong person, then we both are. The Prius Limited is likely to be my next car. It looks like the Civic Hybrid Hatchback in top trim will be right at the same price. I like the Prius’s looks better, but it’s more of a liftback. I’d trade those looks for a true hatch with better build and the new Honda tire noise resonators. If the new Civic had ventilated seats too it would be a no-brainer for me.

Mr. Fusion
Mr. Fusion
1 month ago
Reply to  Epochellipse

For me it’s the lack of a heated steering wheel on the Civic that’s hurting. As I get older I’m realizing that that is my must-have. I’m in a nice climate so I barely use the heated seats in my car, but I use the heated steering wheel every morning during 3 seasons.

The Corolla Cross Hybrid is also missing the heated steering wheel. The Kona and Niro both have it, but both of those give me pause for various reasons.

Epochellipse
Epochellipse
1 month ago
Reply to  Mr. Fusion

I like heated seats because I’m old and have a bad back. I live in SoCal so that wheel heat just isn’t crucial to me, but when I use it on rentals it’s undeniably nice to have. I’m coming around on it. My ideal car has cooled seats but heated lumbar support at the same time. ONE DAY, ONE HAPPY DAY.

Daniel MacDonald
Daniel MacDonald
1 month ago

When did it become mandatory for every factory stereo system to be branded as coming from an speaker/audio company, especially in this case where it’s the base model.

Andrew Wyman
Andrew Wyman
1 month ago

I “feel” like this started popping up in the late 90’s-early 2000’s in the luxury brands, but that might be a false memory.

Daniel MacDonald
Daniel MacDonald
1 month ago
Reply to  Andrew Wyman

I think you’re right-I had a used ’98 audi years ago with a “bose” sound system. I’ve owned 2 cars with Bose branded sound systems and have ridden in a friend’s car with one and they all genuinely had great audio. BUT I think it’s stupid that it’s become the standard now, especially in the case of this car (and possibly others) where even the base model car has a branded stereo. Kind of makes sense to me on the premium stereo offering, but when you’re base car has a branded stereo it’s hard to argue that I should pay more to get Bose vs JBL-at least in my experience with home audio JBL stuff is pretty solid.

GreatFallsGreen
GreatFallsGreen
1 month ago

Do you mean base model as the entry level offering in the overall lineup or just the trim levels? Only the top Civic trims (former Touring/Sport Touring/Si) get the 12-speaker Bose, the lower trims are 4 or 8 speakers unbranded.

Even back in the early 90s, Nissan offered Bose audio in the Maxima, Honda offered Bose on some early special edition Accords*, JBL could be optioned on Camrys and Tauruses, so it could be found on nicer trim ‘regular’ brands. It started to trickle into smaller cars more in the 2000s, Jettas with Monsoon sound like Pontiac offered, the original Focus with Sony sound, Mazda offered Bose on the 3, Toyota pushed Pioneer in Scions, etc.

*Aside from earlier days, any Honda models offering a name brand audio is actually pretty recent, even the most expensive offerings like the Pilot didn’t until the current generation. Acura had their ELS system, but is making a big deal about offering B&O in the facelifted MDX.

Daniel MacDonald
Daniel MacDonald
1 month ago

Well shoot I need to slow down and read more thoroughly lol, I misread the article as saying the base hybrid Civic came with a JBL sound system. So yes some version of this has been common for awhile and ideally I’d retract my original comment…

GreatFallsGreen
GreatFallsGreen
1 month ago

lol, makes much more sense now! I do see how it can read that way.

Ross Fuller
Ross Fuller
1 month ago

welcome to late stage capitalism…

Daniel MacDonald
Daniel MacDonald
1 month ago
Reply to  Ross Fuller

sigh, I suppose ’80s dystopian sci-fi predicted this

Ottomottopean
Ottomottopean
1 month ago

Full disclosure: I work at Harman though not in our automotive division.

We actually partner with, and manufacture these systems for, the auto manufacturers. So in the lower tier autos like a Civic you’ll find the JBL systems we make while stepping up to an Acura will give you access to Harman Kardon systems. We also do Mark Levinson for even higher tiers.

My guess is (because I don’t know) is the base model systems get a standard audio system made by Bosch. They make everything. But companies like ours have a full staff of audio engineers to design a better system so Honda doesn’t staff that particular area of expertise.

We actually design a lot of the full infotainment suites with the manufacturers for those systems but I do not know the extent the manufacturers are designing and dictating to us or if we are doing all of it.

I’m sure it’s similar to the others in the space. I hope I get to learn more about all that while I’m there. Only just started with them a few months back.

Steve P
Steve P
1 month ago
Reply to  Ottomottopean

So what’s the difference in cost to get a decently powered chip into a infotainment system instead of whatever gets used that generates a laggy experience?

Citrus
Citrus
1 month ago

I think it started around when Chrysler did the Infinity system with the little joystick.

Epochellipse
Epochellipse
1 month ago

Probably right after makers abandoned the DIN and double DIN form factor and integrated audio with other controls. The iPad On The Dashboard Era basically destroyed the aftermarket head unit market for new cars.

Cerberus
Cerberus
1 month ago

Civics are a little overpriced in general, IMO, though for what they want for the hybrid, I’d get an Si for (theoretically) less were I going Honda, though if they had a manual with the hybrid, that would change my mind, especially with the problematic 1.5T. Of course, I kind of went through this in ’22 sans hybrid option and went with a GR86 over a more expensive as-base-as-I-could-spec-hatch-with-a-manual that I was unlikely to find without ADM, anyway. At this point, the Civic is really closer to a Camry in size (unfortunately), so it’s more of a nominal Corolla competitor out of tradition than present reality. Don’t know about the Hyundai as I have less than no interest, but the Corolla is not only smaller and boring as one would expect (if not as bad dynamically as I thought it would be, it was no fun at all), but feels like a class cheaper car. As for mileage, shopping at that end of the scale, the real world difference in fuel cost is negligible, though consumption/waste is probably a higher priority with shoppers than the cost savings so much (especially considering the higher vehicle purchase cost). Overall, I think it’s a bit expensive, but not outrageous considering the prices of the industry as a whole. I’d have to drive one to see if it’s better than the Corolla in more than acceleration, but my top pick here would be the Prius (!—Who the hell even am I anymore?!).

Daniel MacDonald
Daniel MacDonald
1 month ago
Reply to  Cerberus

If nothing else the corolla has a woefully boring interior that imo is worst in class. Sadly I think the Prius also suffers from a subpar interior even as Toyota significantly upgraded the rest of the car.

Cerberus
Cerberus
1 month ago

It’s definitely typical Toyota with a cheaper seeming and more boring designed interior compared to competitors.

Daniel MacDonald
Daniel MacDonald
1 month ago
Reply to  Cerberus

Yeah I guess that is their MO, but it feels like the delta between toyota interiors and the competition was not always quite this big?

Cerberus
Cerberus
1 month ago

I’m trying to think. Before VW kicked everyone in the ass and got them to make better interiors (I can finally thank them for something) around the turn of the millennium, it was tough to gauge good from bad as most seemed pretty cheap and bland, especially the generation that started 5 years or so leading up to the millennium (after the unfavorable yen/dollar ratio left the Japanese making lower profits, so they started cutting back on quality). I think the 4th and 5th gen Celicas were decent, but that might be faulty memory. IIRC, the Corollas were terrible or maybe that was just my ex’s mother driving one that’s affecting my evaluation (it probably was bad, though). The other issue clouding my mind is the prevalence of that Athena-awful plastic tan that made everything it was slathered in look cheap and ugly. My mk1 Legacy had a dark medium blue that looked like it was of much better quality as well as appearance compared to my sister’s with that tan, so I don’t feel fair judging a car if I only saw them in that color. I really liked the Hondas of the early and mid ’90s and I was never a big Toyota fan partly because of the interiors, but the controls always felt anti-driver with terrible feedback and I often didn’t like the cars themselves much in general, even though I respected the durability. Against GM and Ford, though, I think Toyota held their own.

Daniel MacDonald
Daniel MacDonald
1 month ago
Reply to  Cerberus

Yeah agreed, and that’s sorta my point is that even GM (notoriously some of the worst interiors) is now making an econo car with a nicer looking interior than Toyota in the Trax.

Lol yeah ’90s beige/tan interiors especially when EVERYTHING was that color as such a bad time for car interiors.

Cerberus
Cerberus
1 month ago

I thought it was funny when the mk3 Focus came out and it got criticized for the interior, which was certainly nothing special, but still better than the contemporary Corolla my friend had and much better to drive with better mileage, more power, better handling, more space (at least with the hatch), more solid and premium feel, and it was just as reliable (with the 5MT). Probably even cost less.

EXL500
EXL500
1 month ago

Not to mention the Corolla’s oatmeal dynamics.

Epochellipse
Epochellipse
1 month ago

Most of the new Prius interior doesn’t impress me but doesn’t bother me. That new steering wheel and gauge cluster area though. It’s just hideous. It’s a shame, I think the exterior looks really cool.

Daniel MacDonald
Daniel MacDonald
1 month ago
Reply to  Epochellipse

Yeah honestly I mostly hate the steering wheel so much, the rest is just kind of bland. But that’s a huge part of interior design it’s the aspect of the car I interact with the most. It is a shame because the outside looks really good and then it makes the interior look worse by comparison. Like if it looked like a typical Prius I would expect the interior to be somewhere between weirdly bland and ugly but on the new Prius the outside sets an expectation that isn’t matched by the interior.

Rabob Rabob
Rabob Rabob
1 month ago
Reply to  Cerberus

I’m a Honda fan but the Toyota is up on both power and torque compared to the Civic and has a better transmission (real 1st gear into the CVT).

Not that comparing tin can commuters really matters much though.

Daniel MacDonald
Daniel MacDonald
1 month ago
Reply to  Rabob Rabob

I’d have to drive them both, in my experience the small amount of extra power the Corolla has won’t offset it’s otherwise crappy driving dynamics. Also Honda makes smoother better sounding 4 cylinder engines, typically.

Root Beer
Root Beer
1 month ago

I think they’re referring to the Prius, because the Corolla Hybrid has significantly less power than the Civic. That the Civic is close in fuel economy to the Corolla while having considerably more power, plus the better driving dynamics, could justify it being more expensive.

Daniel MacDonald
Daniel MacDonald
1 month ago
Reply to  Root Beer

Ah oops, yeah agreed, at least for me it would. And it makes sense, the Civic has always been the slightly nicer to drive alternative to the Corolla.

Jj
Jj
1 month ago

Current 2024 Civic Sport Touring (non-hybrid) starts at $31,450 so I don’t find the hybrid’s pricing surprising at all.

Is the fuel economy even that important on Hybrids anymore? It’s not like there’s one hybrid available and you have to make it part of your lifestyle to own it. Hybrids are everywhere now – they’re not special. They look like everything else and you don’t need to sacrifice style, space or driving dynamics to buy them. I can completely see buying the hybrid version of something just because that’s what the dealer has on the lot – with no real concern over fuel economy.

NJR-XJR
NJR-XJR
1 month ago

My fiancee and I bought a Corolla Hybrid about 6 months ago, primarily for her to drive. MSRP right around $27k. Coming from a 20-year-old dying shitbox, all she wanted was basic, affordable, reliable transportation and the car has certainly delivered on that. She is thrilled with it.

Of course, it is not an “enthusiast” car by any means, but the thing that really caught me off guard was the lack of basic comfort/ergonomic features. I daily a 2016 VW GSW which, adjusted for inflation, is not too far off in price than the Corolla, so I was expecting similar cheapness/lack of features. But the Corolla brings cost-cutting to a new level. A few things that I’ve found frustrating:
– Center armrest is not adjustable.
– Lack of driver storage space (no overhead sunglasses storage, center console bin is tiny, door pockets hardly fit a water bottle, etc).
– The intermittent wiper speed is not adjustable and the lowest setting is way too fast for when there is only light drizzle.
– Most of the buttons are not back-lit and difficult to use when driving at night.
– No pocket on the back of the front seats.
– Probably more that I can’t think of off the top of my head…

Maybe my expectations were too high, but I think that if the Civic offers some of these features that the base Corolla lacks, coupled with the perennial lack of availability of all Toyota hybrids, I wouldn’t be surprised to see even the most budget-minded people willing to spend a little extra to get into the Civic.

Daniel MacDonald
Daniel MacDonald
1 month ago
Reply to  NJR-XJR

My wife dailys a 2005 Pontiac Vibe and her work has a couple of corolla hybrids for company cars and she’s even complained how they barely feel nicer inside than her car, and definitely feel really basic compared to other cars in the same class.

Taargus Taargus
Taargus Taargus
1 month ago

This seems fine. Yeah it’s a bit expensive, but the Civic has always been more expensive compared to the equivalent Corolla or Elantra. All three have their place. Corolla will be the most trustworthy (but slow as hell), the Hyundai will have the best features (but do you trust it/the dealer?) and the Honda will likely be the best to drive, (but most expensive). One of these should slot in nicely to whatever a buyer is looking for from a hybrid sedan.

Mechjaz
Mechjaz
1 month ago

+1, I was prepared to be shocked by some low $40’s but it’s only $2-3k difference. I’d probably personally pick the Hyundai at this point, but the difference between $30,600 and $32,800 doesn’t knock Honda out of contention.

Stryker_T
Stryker_T
1 month ago

The corolla and Elantra also look miles better and not giving duck face all the time.

Fjord
Fjord
1 month ago

The Hondas I’ve had have been completely reliable, and this Civic looks better and drives better. I’d cross-shop, but wouldn’t be surprised at all if I ended up with the Civic.

Civics aren’t really Civics anymore, but that’s another issue. I’d love to see a proper Honda subcompact hatch again but won’t hold my breath.

Last edited 1 month ago by Fjord
Michael Beranek
Michael Beranek
1 month ago
Reply to  Fjord

Civics aren’t really Civics anymore”
That true, it’s as large as an Accord was just a few decades ago.

Root Beer
Root Beer
1 month ago
Reply to  Fjord

I wish they didn’t kill the Fit here. I’d pay for one spec’d like a Civic Sport Touring 6MT if it were available, but I’d be a fringe case because that’s not the target demographic for the segment.

Mike B
Mike B
1 month ago

Honda has a high opinion of itself. Personally, I think the Elantra hybrid is the best deal, or Corolla if you’re not quite sold on Hyundai reliability.

GreatFallsGreen
GreatFallsGreen
1 month ago

Civics in general are expensive, so this isn’t really new or exclusive to the hybrid. The base Civic LX was already a $25k car with 4 speakers, wheel covers, and single speed intermittent wipers. Before anyone says “I don’t need more than that” it’s more that competitors give you the same for less money, or more for the same price. Not even talking H/K, that goes for regular Corollas or even like the Mazda 3. But the Civic outsells the Accord now, so people are paying up.

Also Honda and Toyota are moving toward hybrid powertrains not as just economical options but engine upgrades that happen to be hybrids.

Two things to keep in mind vs the Corolla:
The Civic is much roomier inside (same against a Prius). Nearly 10 cubic feet of interior volume (little less when equipped with moonroofs, which the Civic hybrids all have) and nearly 2 cubic feet more trunk space. Actually the Civic is closer to the new Camry in several dimensions than the Corolla, mostly losing out on width, so it sort of splits the two.

The Civic is going to be a better performer vs. the Corolla. Tests of the Accord hybrid put it much quicker than what Corolla hybrids have been tested at. Against a Prius it’s a much narrower but the Prius’ tech is newer/more improved and I’d expect the next Corolla will be improved in that regard.

XXLTall
XXLTall
1 month ago

So the Maverick way is start cheap make few then rise up price. Honda are just like screw it lets start high and make few.

Drive By Commenter
Drive By Commenter
1 month ago

Is the Corolla a snooze to drive? The Civic may be more of a drivers car. Otherwise it’s another victim of “premium everything”.

Cerberus
Cerberus
1 month ago

YES! It’s a very good car for people who want the cheapest buying and running costs with the least worry and DGAF about a driving experience. It’s not torture and was better than I expected in terms of performance (“performance”?), that is being perfectly adequate with better grip from the eco tires than I thought (they must have gotten a lot better), and I easily beat the rated mileage, but it will give your soul a dull ache if you enjoy driving and will be disappointing to anyone who wants anything that feels premium or has a bunch of features (not that anyone should expect that).

Drive By Commenter
Drive By Commenter
1 month ago
Reply to  Cerberus

That confirms my suspicions. Not a driver’s car by any means. The one newer Civic I’ve ridden in felt pretty responsive. Every Toyota I’ve driven or ridden in needed to be pushed to 8/10 to at least get some semblance of personality.

Cerberus
Cerberus
1 month ago

Guy at work has a 1.5T Civic and it’s definitely a better driver. He did have an engine blow, though, it was a warranty job. IMO, if you care about driving, life is too short and uncertain to drive the Corolla if you can afford a little annoyance or worry in exchange for some personality. I had a Camry I had to buy in an emergency and thought I’d keep it as a 2nd car, but every time I drove it, I wondered why I was doing that to myself with the GR86 at home. Saving the miles? For who?

EXL500
EXL500
1 month ago

Yes.

Detroit Lightning
Detroit Lightning
1 month ago

Pricing seems like a huge misstep compared with the corolla.

Nsane In The MembraNe
Nsane In The MembraNe
1 month ago

I sure hope this powertrain finds its way into the Integra but I don’t know if it will. Luxury buyers are more open to EVs and as a result many luxury brands are skipping hybrids entirely…and Acura now has that 6,000 pound ultium abomination.

Anyway, I’d gladly pay the premium for this over an Elantra or Corolla. It has better styling, a better interior, and more power than both. I also trust Honda’s hybrid system over Hyundai’s when it comes to longevity.

Harvey Firebirdman
Harvey Firebirdman
1 month ago

Yeah I think the only comparable one here is probably the Camry don’t the Elantra and Corolla have way less horse power figures?

Rippstik
Rippstik
1 month ago

Still, I’d have the Civic. Seems like the best all-rounder, between the extra power and competitive MPG. Plus, the interior seems to be nicer than the Corolla.

Brandon Forbes
Brandon Forbes
1 month ago

Thank you for this. I was reading the drive’s take on this and they just referenced that it was cheaper than a Prius, which is missing the point entirely. This is not meant to compete with the Prius, the corolla comparison is dead on and yeah then the civic no longer looks like the good deal, because it isn’t.

Vic Vinegar
Vic Vinegar
1 month ago
Reply to  Brandon Forbes

Yeah it seems if the hybrid will be sedan only? If it had a hatch option I would cross shop it with the Prius.

GreatFallsGreen
GreatFallsGreen
1 month ago
Reply to  Vic Vinegar

The hatchback was covered as part of the initial announcement last month and gets the same trims minus the LX, but would have been good if this article also mentioned that hatch hybrid pricing will be announced later – Honda said in their press release later this summer. If it follows current pricing, the hatch will probably be around a grand more; a Sport hybrid hatch will probably split the difference between the LE/XLE Prius trims, and the Sport Touring between XLE/Limited.

Vic Vinegar
Vic Vinegar
1 month ago

Ah, right now the Honda website only seemed to mention “Civic sedan” as a coming soon hybrid, which they do differentiate from the “Civic hatchback” model.

GreatFallsGreen
GreatFallsGreen
1 month ago
Reply to  Vic Vinegar

Yes, it’s strange how they’ve buried it on there. The hatch does show as one of the sliders on the homepage, but hasn’t gotten a dedicated landing page the way the sedan has had, the ‘learn more’ just links out to the press release.

Jj
Jj
1 month ago

Damn. I checked Honda’s website today and saw the sedan thing. I thought there may be hope of retaining the manual in the hatchback. Meh.

These are dark days for fans of the third pedal.

GreatFallsGreen
GreatFallsGreen
1 month ago
Reply to  Jj

Maybe they’ll still surprise us with something with the proper announcement of the ’25 Si…doubtful though, given the Canadian hatch and Si specs have been out and not meaningfully changed.

Ranwhenparked
Ranwhenparked
1 month ago
Reply to  Brandon Forbes

It isn’t even cheaper than a Prius though, the Prius starts at $29,470 including destination charge, so the Civic Hybrid is still a few hundred more

Brandon Forbes
Brandon Forbes
1 month ago
Reply to  Ranwhenparked

I think they were comparing top specs but I don’t remember, I stopped paying attention because it just didn’t make sense

Jj
Jj
1 month ago
Reply to  Ranwhenparked

Prii climb pretty quickly from that base price.

GreatFallsGreen
GreatFallsGreen
1 month ago
Reply to  Brandon Forbes

That doesn’t really mean they won’t be cross-shopped though. If you’re in a Toyota showroom, a higher-equipped hybrid Corolla, a base Prius, and a base Camry are all arguably on the table, especially since the cheapest of those three is actually the least efficient.

Brandon Forbes
Brandon Forbes
1 month ago

Fair. Most people I have known with Priusesii all wanted that and only that, but the current gen definitely has a lot more mainstream appeal than it ever used to

GreatFallsGreen
GreatFallsGreen
1 month ago
Reply to  Brandon Forbes

I think that will still tend to be the case just since Prius production is much lower than the other two. But there’s probably people that will still just equate Prius with fuel economy and might start out looking at those, then move to a cheaper (Corolla) or bigger (Camry) option when they see the price.

The Civic hybrid seems to more split the difference between different Toyota options.

Jj
Jj
1 month ago

I like the new Camry, and would love a wagon version… I guess the closest thing to that is the Crown Signia which includes a significant price jump.

I can’t believe I’ve become so automotively old that I’m willing to buy a Camry but they don’t make a Camry frumpy enough for me.

MrLM002
MrLM002
1 month ago

It’s a real shame how fat and long the modern Civic has gotten. I’m not even that old and I remember there being compact Civics in the past.

Harvey Firebirdman
Harvey Firebirdman
1 month ago
Reply to  MrLM002

Yeah it seems the civic has pretty much replaced the accord size wize. While the accord has gotten even bigger.

Taargus Taargus
Taargus Taargus
1 month ago
Reply to  MrLM002

The real issue is that there’s no longer a smaller option (Fit) to take over for what the Civic once was.

EXL500
EXL500
1 month ago

I need more likes for this. Signed: Fit owner.

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