Home » I Thought I Was Buying A Safe Used Car. I Found A Secret Modification That Could Have Killed Me

I Thought I Was Buying A Safe Used Car. I Found A Secret Modification That Could Have Killed Me

Time Bomb Crz
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Like every other automotive journalist, I have eyes bigger than my car-shaped stomach. To us, cars are tasty little morsels that we can’t help but overindulge on until we metaphorically throw up. Well, folks – I’m throwing up. I’ve tried to chew and chew, and keep things down, but I’ve overeaten, and the Honda-shaped bile has risen. Or, was I poisoned?

Ignoring my probably overwrought and too-gross-for-publication metaphor, I’ve learned some really terrible things about my 2011 Honda CR-Z, and thus, the world at large. I recently learned that my car didn’t have working airbags. And I’m not sure the previous owner knew, either.

Vidframe Min Top
Vidframe Min Bottom

I fully admit that I had no business buying the CR-Z, but its low price and rarity caught my eye. The owner, a college kid studying far from home, had enlisted the help of his mom to sell the broken car. The seller’s mom was charming – she was a woman about the same age as my mom, just looking to help her college-aged kid get through school. In her words, the CR-Z was a flawless car that her kid got a good deal on, only for it to never start again after a long drive from Atlanta to Cleveland. It all checked out; she (nor her son) seemed like they had nothing to hide, and I had already convinced myself that I needed that car. So I gave her cash and transferred the title in my name before looking too closely at the car. It was a clean title Honda with less than 150,000 miles – how bad could it be?

Honda Cr Z

It was very bad. Both door handles had broken off — very common for the CR-Z. Neither handle is cheap R about $200 for OEM replacements. The previous owner had sort of tied the seatbelt around the driver’s door to keep it from flying open but also jammed a Swisher Sweets cigar-pack wrapper to keep the door from latching closed so he could get in and out of it if he needed to. The car had been smoked in, thus the interior’s grey fabric was now a horrible shade of brown. It was littered with half-drunk bottles of grocery store 42-proof tequila and Peak Iced tea, now both frozen and molding from the six months the car sat in his grandmother’s driveway. The deleted rear seat turned storage cubbies had Tupperware with half-eaten months old food, the dust of looseleaf tobacco, brand new brake pads, and a bottle of Valu Time brand Italian seasoning. The dashboard plastic was just as gross, sticky, and smelly as the seats and headliner.

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Aside from the horrible physical shape, it had been subject to the previous owner’s really tacky modifications. There was a color-changing fiber optic cable that went across the dashboard at some point. The cable was gone, but I still had the remote for it. The windows had been tinted, but they didn’t use the same brand of tint, because the rear windshield is brown and peeling, but the side windows are black. The stock wheels had been spray painted black, but they didn’t do a good job or use the right paint. And there was a weird Mugen jelly phone holder stuck to the middle of the dashboard. Any sane person would have passed.

Honda Crz Exploded

But, I’m not sane. I towed the car 150 miles to my house and proceeded to dump it in a field next to my trusted mechanic friend’s shop. A year of employment changes and a lack of motivation saw my mechanic and I abandon the CR-Z while we both tried in vain to figure out why neither of us could program a new OEM key, and start the vehicle.

Until, one day I finally got it started. The car was still gross inside, the tires were bald, the brake rotors were toast – but the important parts were working well. The car’s engine, hybrid battery, and CVT transmission were strong. The rest was all cosmetic. I fixed the brakes, got a set of new tires, changed the oil and transmission fluid, and the CR-Z was running like new.

I had been driving the CR-Z for about two weeks, holding my breath and ignoring the musty smells as much as I could, and figuring out a plan of action as to what exactly was worth fixing on the car. I wasn’t going to get any profit at this point, but I didn’t want to give up on the thing – it was running nicely, even if it wasn’t very pretty. I figured I could detail the interior and sell it cheaply just to get my money back.

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Life had other plans, though. The CR-Z had baked in the sun for the better part of a year. Our star’s rays had done a number on the tacked-on aftermarket stuff. The crappy tint had started to bubble, and the Mugen jelly cellphone pad had raised up from the dashboard. 

Jelly Disguise2

I ripped off the ugly dash pad only to learn a terrible, terrible truth. The passenger-side airbag had deployed at some point earlier in the CR-Z’s life, and the ugly jelly pad was covering a big hole in the dashboard.

No Airbag2

I looked at the car closer. The seatbelt on the passenger side was locked, but the driver’s one couldn’t retract. I initially chalked it up to gunk being stuck in the retractor mechanism, that happened to me once with a Hyundai Tiburon; a busted rear windshield had flung glass shards over the interior. The previous owner vacuumed up most of them, but some shards had jammed the retractor module (and trunk latch). Those were easy fixes. The Tiburon also had corrosion in the seatbelt latch sensor, nothing a bit of scrubbing and reinstalling couldn’t fix.

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Img 2210

The CR-Z was far more serious. Scanning the CR-Z revealed a hard crash code in the SRS module, in which the driver’s airbag and seatbelt pre-tensioners explosive charges had been deployed. When an accident happens, these codes are unclearable. Only an SRS computer replacement will make the codes go away.

I knew the car had been in a minor accident, the CarFax had said so. The gap on the front fascia is clearly not stock, but the clean title told me it was likely just a low-quality body guy. Someone who was not skilled, but not malicious.

Img 1414

But, the more investigation I did, the more disturbed I got. Whoever tried to repair the CR-Z didn’t just cut corners by not correctly rehanging a front bumper. They had taken spare airbag connectors and wired in resistors. They had done this for both front seatbelt retractors, the passenger airbag, and the driver’s airbag in what I assume was an attempt to get the airbag light to stay off. The driver’s airbag had been replaced, (but not hooked up), and the missing passenger airbag was disguised with that ugly Mugen jelly pad.Dashboard

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The CR-Z transaction was done via Facebook. We were strangers, but I still had somewhat of a relationship with the previous owner, he really was a nice guy. He had confessed that he didn’t really want to sell the CR-Z, but he needed money for school, and he couldn’t afford to fix the car. Over the year or so that I’ve had the car, he’s occasionally messaged me, asking if I had got it running yet, and talking about how much he missed the car. I had enough rapport to ask him if he knew about the lack of airbags or working seatbelts.

Dashboard Wires

He said he knew the airbag light was on, but I could tell from the candor of our conversation he didn’t understand why these things were important. My heart sank. This kid had been scammed.

Luckily, whoever did the wiring job on the CR-Z, was a complete dumbass. The SRS computer had a hard crash code that can’t be reset with a scanner, so the airbag light will always be on, no matter what cheap tricks you try to get it to stay off. The resistors were wired pretty badly, likely hastily cold-soldered since there were cracked soldering joints. It would have never worked.

But, what if it did? If the shady repair guy had been successful, the CR-Z’s airbag light would have stayed off. Meaning, if the naive and young previous owner had ever gotten into even a minor accident, he could have been seriously hurt. The seatbelts won’t do anything, and neither will the airbags. At the very least, the appearance of a driver’s airbag (that isn’t hooked up) and the awkward cover of the blown passenger airbag would have been enough to fool a buyer who doesn’t know any better. I mean, it fooled me.Img 1407

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Repairs like those done on the CR-Z were clearly the work of someone who isn’t a good person. They wanted to hide the car’s problems, and cheat someone out of a dollar, at the expense of someone’s life. The kid who thought he was getting a deal was putting his life in danger every time he got behind the wheel of that car and didn’t even know it. That stuff burns me up.

I am hard-headed and crazy, and I’m not giving up on the CR-Z even though I am incredibly over budget. I can’t be the guy to let an unsafe car go back on the road, under my name. I know better, I know what the car needs. So, I’m fixing it.

Today Crz

I’ve replaced the passenger airbag and dashboard, installed new seatbelts that work, and I’ve pulled out all the junky resistors from the seatbelts and airbags to make sure the interface with the SRS computer. The SRS computer has been replaced, and it appears that the CRZ’s safety systems are now fully functional.

My CR-Z will live to see another day, but I am angry at what it took to get here.

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Goblin
Goblin
11 months ago

Ages ago, in Europe, I was buying used cars and flipping them beyond Europe to get me through college, and I can say one thing – the worst-lying used car owners > sellers are nice young moms, followed by nice old ladies, followed by students.

As opposed to professional lot lizzards, they actually do believe they are doing you a service by lying to you and are delusional enough to put anything technical either under a pride sign (“I fixed it well, and for cheap“), or an “It’s Ok” sign.

I don’t buy for a nanosecond that the seller of this one didn’t know what had been done on this CRZ.

ScottyB
ScottyB
11 months ago

I can see the appeal of a CR-Z in general, but this car specifically is the equivalent of getting a good deal on a house from someone that was featured on Hoarders. And comparing a CR-Z with 150,000 miles to any garden variety Honda isn’t even close to an apples to apples comparison.

That being said, the way things are going, non-working airbags in twelve-year old car might not be a bad as it sounds. a 2000 vintage Honda with the original bags would be a death trap, so halfway between then and now would be iffy at best.

Chi_spotting
Chi_spotting
11 months ago

I bought a ’96 Honda accord with no airbags, but I knew it didn’t have any because it had covers over where they’d go that said NO AIRBAG INSIDE lol. I also got it for $10, yet I babied that thing for some stupid reason. I should’ve treated it like the trash can on wheels it was.

M0L0TOV
M0L0TOV
11 months ago

It seems like this happens more often than not. Samcrac did a video on an Escalade with the same exact issues. He had the seatbelts rebuilt and replaced the airbags. I’m glad nothing bad happened while the vehicle was being driven around without proper safety features.

90sBuicksAreUnderrated
90sBuicksAreUnderrated
11 months ago

Sorry you went through this. My parents went through something similar in the early 90’s with a used Mercury Sable wagon. As new parents, they were looking for a decent budget car and found the Sable for sale by a private seller. This is well before the Carfax days. My Dad did some cursory checks but they didn’t get a PPI.

A couple months later, my Mom was having trouble with the transmission and they took it to a mechanic. Further inspection revealed that the car had been in a horrible accident and the unibody completely compromised beyond repair. The unscrupulous seller had shoddily slapped it together, given it a paint job and foisted it onto a family with two infant children that he’d personally met. Even a relatively minor accident could have seriously hurt or killed us, not to mention the financial setback for my parents at the time. People who do this type of thing should be locked up (the previous seller of your car, not the kid).

Anyway, good on you for fixing it properly. I personally would’ve sent it to the scrapyard and cut my losses. Then again, I paid to have an engine rebuilt on a 1997 Buick Riviera, which wasn’t exactly a rational financial decision. There’s a reason we’re all on this site.

Anthony Magagnoli
Anthony Magagnoli
11 months ago

I’d be interested in understanding the financials of this purchase, repair, and current value. I can’t imagine that it would be worth the repair expense, even if the car was free.

Major Malfunction
Major Malfunction
11 months ago

While I admire your adventurous spirit and pursuit of automotive journalism, this article comes across as “a fool and his money are soon parted”. Who buys a used car and doesn’t hook it up to a code reader beforehand? Especially someone who writes about cars for a living? If anything, one would hope someone in your business would be semi-impossible to dupe.

Nevermind that. Who buys a car with an interior in that type on condition? If you have total disregard for the space that actually operate in, you can assume with great certainty that EVERYTHING else was treated with the same amount of care. Like if I was car shopping, as soon as my head was inside this interior, its a hard no unless you paid like $500 for this junker and sell it for parts.

Last edited 11 months ago by Major Malfunction
AdamVIP
AdamVIP
11 months ago

This is a painful buy. I cant imagine this being repaired for under what its worth at this point and its not even a manual version.

Mitch
Mitch
11 months ago

I remember reading the story of you buying this over on Jalopnik. I’m glad you’ve found a new home here at Autopian so we can continue reading the flip car stories.

Ricardo
Ricardo
11 months ago

Interesting story about how corners get cut fixing a modern vehicle.

I don’t know how people who do this can sleep at night, but at the end of the day people who do this don’t think like me….. or you.

Geoff Buchholz
Geoff Buchholz
11 months ago

There are a number of comments here directed at whether Kevin should have bought the CR-Z in the first place. They sort of miss the point imho.
>Any Autopian has come face-to-face with a car that they shouldn’t even consider, yet somehow have to have. Because cars are emotional rather than rational purchases, it’s easy to look beyond the red flags and see potential.
>I don’t know Kevin, but I’m a fan of his work, and I know that he’s an experienced car flipper who’s especially able to look past the red flags … because he has the skill and confidence to know he can fix most issues.
>If Kevin had passed on the car and someone else bought it, that would mean an unsafe car would still be out there. It says a lot that instead of junking the thing and cutting his losses (which I might have done), he’s committed to putting a safe (and fun?) car back on the road.
>Also, hindsight and all that.

Hopefully, the CR-Z will soon find a good and appreciative home.

John Patson
John Patson
11 months ago

Buying cars from moms is dangerous. Bit like believing the “it was my grandfather’s” when buying rusting tractors….

Thomas Metcalf
Thomas Metcalf
11 months ago

That is really shitty that somebody pulled a scam. Glad you are making it safe. Although I probably would have cut my losses and scrapped it.

J Money
J Money
11 months ago

So the kid you bought it from drove it from Atlanta to Cleveland without working seat belts, airbags or doors that latched closed? Dear god. You may have literally saved lives by digging into this.

Last edited 11 months ago by J Money
Chronometric
Chronometric
11 months ago

That is dangerous, criminal, and just plain immoral.
Of course it is still safer than my ’64 Corvair daily driver.

Austin Vail
Austin Vail
11 months ago
Reply to  Chronometric

Was gonna say, he’s rightfully horrified by all the hidden hazards in this car… yet even with all those problems, it’s probably safer than my ’66 Thunderbird wherein “safety” is based on how hard you can bang your head on something. Heck my lap belt doesn’t even stay latched half the time, so it’s always a mystery whether I’d die of being skewered by the non-collapsible steering column or get thrown through the windshield before that could happen.

Cool Corvair btw! I love Corvairs.

Last edited 11 months ago by Austin Vail
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