Home » The 2024 Dodge Charger Daytona Is An Electric Car For People Who Hate Electric Cars

The 2024 Dodge Charger Daytona Is An Electric Car For People Who Hate Electric Cars

Charger Ev Ts1
ADVERTISEMENT

What is a muscle car? Merriam-Webster defines it as “any of a group of American-made 2-door sports coupes with powerful engines designed for high-performance driving,” but given that the industry’s preferred method of propulsion is changing, can the muscle car change with it? The 2024 Dodge Charger Daytona is determined to find out, because not only is it a big, quick American coupe, it’s also powered by batteries.

This isn’t the first time we’ve seen the 2024 Dodge Charger Daytona. Previewed by a concept car that made the rounds in 2022 and teased rather liberally early this year, we’ve had plenty of time to prepare for Dodge to dish the details on its make-or-break next-generation Windsor-built family car, and the first two trim levels are finally here.

Vidframe Min Top
Vidframe Min Bottom

Back up a second, Windsor? The one across the border from Detroit? The minivan plant? Yes, but this isn’t the first time Windsor’s ever built Chargers. From 1975 to 1978, Dodge’s B-body coupe was bolted together in the Windsor Assembly Plant, making this 2024 car something of a homecoming.

The Charger, Recharged

The Next Generation Dodge Charger Electrifies A Legend — The C

Dodge has a rich history of trim names, and it’s chosen the Daytona banner to use for all electric Charger variants, with the R/T and Scat Pack trims being the first to arrive (so the full names are “Dodge Charger Daytona Scat Pack” and “Dodge Charger Daytona R/T”). Both of these initial models feature a 400-volt architecture, so the peak DC fast charging rate taps out at 183 kW. With 93.9 kWh of usable battery pack capacity (100.5 total), you’re going to be waiting just over 52 minutes to charge from 5 to 80 percent once you run down the estimated range of 317 miles on the R/T and 260 miles on the Scat Pack.

ADVERTISEMENT

Screen Shot 2024 03 04 At 9.43.21 Pm

Speaking of batteries, we’re looking at a 104S2P pack, meaning two parallel sets of 104 cells arranged in series, that uses prismatic cells. Dodge claims a litany of benefits from going prismatic over cylindrical or pouch cells. As per the automaker:

The battery cell structure is prismatic, offering a more structurally stable cell with better thermal performance through a rigid casing, resulting in lower battery temperatures during high performance driving. The nickel cobalt aluminum chemistry of the battery cell provides more power per gram — the battery-electric version of high-octane fuel.

Nickel cobalt aluminum (NCA) cells are desirable for their power density, often at or above 200 watt-hours per kilogram. They might not be as resilient as lithium iron phosphate cells, but they pack one hell of a punch, which is why companies like Dodge and Tesla use them in EVs. By the way, Dodge claims that the pack in the Charger Daytona offers “a peak discharge rate of 550 kW — specifically designed to maximize acceleration by allowing the motor to utilize the most power the battery can output in the span of a quarter mile.” Nice.

Charger Callouts Numbers Integrated Cap

While we’re on the subject of goings-on under the skin, it’s worth noting that the Charger Daytona is Dodge’s first application of the STLA Large platform. The automaker is throwing the buzzword “BEV-native” at this platform, but for the sake of clarity, STLA Large is a flexible architecture made to accept longitudinal combustion power and skateboard electric power.

ADVERTISEMENT

This also means that the Charger no longer draws inspiration from Y2K Mercedes-Benzes for its suspension geometry, now riding on a multi-link setup in the front and an integral link setup out back, the latter of which is named so because it controls caster using a compact and clever vertical integral link on each corner, eliminating the need for a space-robbing trailing arm and offering superior kinematic control, so long as rear axle steering isn’t desired.

Screen Shot 2024 03 04 At 9.09.34 Pm

Fortunately, once a Charger Daytona is done juicing up, it should be hellaciously quick thanks to a 250 kW motor with an integrated inverter and 11:1 gearset on each axle. Yep, this thing’s all-wheel-drive, and the front motor can effectively free-wheel when desired to boost efficiency. The Scat Pack trim cranks out 630 horsepower, which temporarily climbs to 670 horsepower when the Power Shot button on the steering wheel is pressed (see above). Dodge says the Scat Pack’s good for zero-to-60 mph in 3.3 seconds and the quarter-mile in 11.5 seconds. That’s nigh-on Hellcat quick, although given how tricky it is to launch a Hellcat, expect the Charger Daytona Scat Pack to be far more consistent. Even the 456-horsepower R/T model is solidly quick, with a claimed zero-to-60 mph time of 4.7 seconds and claimed quarter-mile time of 13.1 seconds. Like the Scat Pack, it sees a jump in output by pressing the Power Shot button, briefly adding 40 horsepower for a total of 496.

2024 Dodge Charger Daytona Scat Pack, Shown In Triple Nickel.

ADVERTISEMENT

However, don’t confuse quick with fast. The Charger Daytona Scat Pack tops out at 134 mph, three miles per hour slower than the Charger Daytona R/T and, um, 41 mph slower than the old 6.4-liter V8-powered Scat Pack. You win some, you lose some. Granted, this isn’t the Charger Daytona’s final form, so a faster SRT variant isn’t out of the question.

Of course, just because the Charger Daytona is an EV doesn’t mean it’s silent. The Scat Pack trim comes with what Dodge calls a “Fratzonic Chambered Exhaust,” which contains a couple of passive radiators to let everyone around you know that you’re driving a muscle car. A passive radiator is essentially a speaker cone without the bits that make it go in and out using electrical signals, and passive radiators are frequently used to give Bluetooth speakers some extra kick. In this case, Dodge is using them to wake the dead. The only way the Fratzonic Chambered Exhaust could get more aggressive is if it played “Knuck if You Buck” out the back at 110 decibels.

Three Or Five Doors

The All New Dodge Charger Presents A Distillation Of Muscle Car

One thing that’s strange about the new Dodge Charger Daytona, at least to me, is that it somehow looks less fresh than the model it replaces. There’s a certain recession-era feel to the heaviness of the surfacing, and it’s not just because we haven’t seen many new cars with enough styling for ten in the past few years. Maybe the wheels just don’t make a huge impact, maybe the trailing edge of the door is too far forward, maybe the daytime running light just doesn’t look great split across three elements. Maybe the vents in the rear bumper are poorly resolved, creating an unnecessary ridge where they meet the bodysides, and while the giant slab of dark plastic used as a valence evens out the slope of the hood when viewed in profile, the reflections it catches make you wish the new Charger was a whole lot lower than it is. Then again, maybe some of it is the trickster qualities of silver, or the focal length of the lens used to shoot these photos. I will have to reserve full judgement until I see it in person.

All New Four Door Dodge Charger Daytona R/t, Shown In Peel Out E

ADVERTISEMENT

Fortunately, there is a way to make the Charger look a little more interesting. If rear seat access is a priority for you, a Charger with two doors on each side goes into production early next year, and given what we know about trunk access, that means America’s about to gain a full-sized five-door liftback.

Screen Shot 2024 03 04 At 9.17.31 Pm

Maybe it’s the revised greenhouse slimming out the C-pillar, maybe it’s the fact that the doors are now located properly, but there’s something nice about the five-door model, and it’s not just the wider virtual camera angle used in the CGI renderings manipulating the model to look longer. To me, there’s an incremental improvement here, but it’s not night-and-day.

The Optional Full Length Glass Roof Of The All New Dodge Charger

While we don’t have full specifications for all variants of the new Charger Daytona, we do have dimensions of the three-door model, and they’re audacious. Measuring 206.6 inches stem-to-stern in R/T trim and 79.8 inches wide, the new Charger is an enormous machine that’s even larger than its predecessor, a full-size sedan. For the record, that’s only 1.6 inches shorter than a brand new Mercedes-Benz S-Class, and half an inch longer than a Lexus LS. Oh, and then there’s the width, which makes the Charger Daytona just one tenth of an inch narrower than a Ford F-150 and 1.1 inches wider than a Lamborghini Countach LP5000S QV. We’re talking outrageous dimensions here. In person, this car should have capital-P Presence.

ADVERTISEMENT

More Damper, More Rubber, More Management Of More Curb Weight

The Next Generation Dodge Charger Electrifies A Legend — The C

So, big car, excellent power, quick acceleration times. What else are we working with here? Well, Dodge seems to have done some work with the intention of making the new Charger handle, and some of that work seems to incorporate the ‘Murica F-yeah more-is-better philosophy to a tee. Old habits die hard, right?

Tick the box for the Track Pack on the Dodge Charger Daytona Scat Pack (so the full name will be: “Dodge Charger Daytona Scat Pack With Track Package”), and you’ll get dual-valve adaptive dampers, 410 mm brake discs with fixed calipers on all four corners, and sticky track day-oriented Goodyear Eagle F1 Supercar 3 tires measuring 305/35ZR20 up front and 325/35ZR20 out back. Why might it need such enormous tires? Well, a curb weight of 5,838 pounds in electric Charger Daytona Scat Pack trim might have something to do with it.

2024 Dodge Charger Daytona Scat Pack, Shown In Triple Nickel.

Speaking of handling-related stuff, the rear drive unit in every Charger Daytona features a proper limited-slip differential for enhanced traction and shenanigans, some of which fall under what Dodge calls Race Options. The Charger Daytona will include a special Donut Mode, which the brand says “Enables the vehicle to spin only the rear wheels and to rotate around either of the front wheels without intervention from the traction control system.”

ADVERTISEMENT

There’s also a drift mode built into the Race Options on the Charger Daytona, and it seems a bit like what McLaren’s doing with Variable Drift Control. According to Dodge:

The driver can select three levels of slip angle, and torque is rear-axle biased, using the front axle to help maintain slip angle. Front dampers become full soft and rear dampers go full stiff to enable an oversteer condition, and the traction control system allows for different wheel speed differentials without setting fault codes.

There are a few things to unpack here, so let’s do that now. Firstly, it sounds like drift mode might not let drivers turn the front motor off completely and go rear-wheel-drive. Granted, 335 horsepower in a 5,838-pound car would work out to 17.4 pounds per horsepower, but you don’t need big power to throw down. Just ask drift-king Keiichi Tsuchiya. Maybe Dodge can push a software update should owners desire, but either way, color us intrigued. Secondly, stiffer rear dampers and softer front dampers should decrease mechanical grip in the rear and increase it in the front, making it easier to initiate a drift. That’s proper race car science and a great unorthodox use of adaptive dampers.

Add in line lock for smoky burnouts, launch control, and special Race Prep battery pre-conditioning, and the Dodge Charger Daytona has a whole lot of toys in its arsenal. As with any functions that may draw attention from local law enforcement, use them responsibly.

The Inside Story

The All New Dodge Charger’s Dynamic, Layered Instrument Panel

If the outside of the 2024 Dodge Charger Daytona is throwing it back to 1968, the cabin is right on time. From the complex, flowing door cards to the proliferation of interactive technology, there’s no mistaking this cockpit for anything but a product of the 2020s. Up to 16 inches of digital instrument cluster behind a squircle steering wheel should offer plenty of information, while a 12.3-inch infotainment touchscreen on a driver-centric tilt feels like it’s here to remind BMW what it should be doing. It’s nice to see Dodge maintaining physical volume and tuning knobs, although not everything in the cabin is physical. The controls for the heated seats? Capacitive touch. The method of killing traction control? An actual button within easy reach of the shifter. Yep, Dodge knows its target market.

ADVERTISEMENT

pistol grip shifter

Speaking of fan service, it’s hard to not feel something looking at Dodge’s electronic reinterpretation of the classic pistol-grip shifter. Sure, a shifter in a typical electric vehicle doesn’t have a manumatic function, but does art need an excuse for existing? The heart wants what the heart wants.

Screen Shot 2024 03 04 At 9.38.50 Pm

Speaking of interior parts to get your pulse racing, check out those high-back seats with harness pass-throughs that look properly special. On the outgoing Charger, you effectively got wingback chairs in performance trims, and while those were plush and well-bolstered, they sure robbed a lot of interior room. These new front seats, in contrast, look to be a better blend of function and form.

Interior Shot Of 2024 Dodge Charger Daytona Scat Pack.

ADVERTISEMENT

Dodge is even offering the new Charger Daytona an integrated 1080p dashcam, an interesting piece of data acquisition gear more focused on track days than capturing incriminating footage of substandard motorists. Admittedly, I don’t expect many people to go hot lapping in a car that’s 206.6 inches long and weighs nearly three tons, but for those who will, we salute you. There’s a higher chance of people dropping the rear seats, opening the hatch, and using 103 cubic feet of cargo space as they see fit, and we salute those people too.

Early Perks

The All New Dodge Charger Presents A Distillation Of Muscle Car

Remember way back in the propulsion system section of this article when we mentioned that the 2024 Charger Daytona Scat Pack will offer 630 horsepower, and the R/T will offer 456 horsepower? That’s only for the 2024 model year because Dodge is throwing in Direct Connection tunes for free, a Stage 1 on the R/T and a Stage 2 on the Scat Pack. Come the 2025 model year, unlocking horsepower will become a pay-to-play game, with your local Dodge parts counter handling the reflash. From Dodge:

The 400V propulsion system packs six performance levels into one powertrain. The 2024 Charger Daytona R/T arrives with a standard Direct Connection Stage 1 upgrade kit that adds 40 horsepower to reach a total of 496 horsepower, while the Daytona Scat Pack is delivered with a Stage 2 kit that offers an increase of additional 80 horsepower, taking total output to 670 horsepower. Future Daytona models will require purchase of Direct Connection Stage kits to upgrade from base models to Stage 1 and Stage 2 performance.

It turns out early adoption has some benefits. Mind you, Dodge makes Direct Connection upgrades sound more complicated than they are. Each trim gets its own Stage 1 and Stage 2 packages, which really gives each owner two choices besides staying stock.

Will It Work?

The Optional Full Length Glass Roof Of The All New Dodge Charger

ADVERTISEMENT

I’d seem like a sellout if I didn’t address the Hellephant in the room — the Dodge Charger Daytona EV is fighting an uphill battle. Just last year, Dodge had an entire lineup of endearing chest-thumping testosterone-laden burnout machines with a combined IQ of about seven. A Hellcat isn’t clever, which is exactly why it’s loved. Big dirty supercharged V8 up front, fully-lit Pirellis out back, “Free Bird” turned up to eleven in the middle — job done. It’s visceral, it’s provocative, it’s a twelve-year-old’s idea of how to make a fast car, and it rules. It wasn’t just Greta Van Fleet to the 1968 Charger’s Led Zeppelin, it was also Lil Durk, Germ, Young Thug, and Sexxy Red — a loud, braggadocious soundtrack for a new generation.

The new electric Dodge Charger Daytona has two potential paths — either win over diehards, or forge a new path. The old Charger eventually did both, but the political polarization of EVs has many muscle car devotees on the other side of the fence. At the same time, a litany of manufacturers are doing seriously interesting stuff with electric vehicles, to the point where a Kia EV6 GT put through Car And Driver testing posted performance numbers on-par with the Charger Daytona Scat Pack. When everything is savagely fast in a straight line and a litany of electric vehicles offer similar power curves, why go for a muscle car over a Nürburgring-tuned crossover, or a compact sports sedan, or something that looks almost French?

taillights

I like the concept of the Dodge Charger Daytona EV. We’re overdue for another three-door liftback, and the thought of a big, comfy, fast family car that isn’t a crossover makes me smile. Whether or not it’s a muscle car is a judgement we’ll have to reserve for when we drive it. If it sparks a fire in the hearts of those who drive it, I have a feeling it could steal some sales from rather unexpected places. Whatever happens, the story really gets going in a few months, as the Charger Daytona EV will enter production mid-year.

(Photo credits: Dodge)

ADVERTISEMENT

Support our mission of championing car culture by becoming an Official Autopian Member.

Relatedbar

Got a hot tip? Send it to us here. Or check out the stories on our homepage.

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on whatsapp
WhatsApp
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on reddit
Reddit
Subscribe
Notify of
163 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Trouthawk
Trouthawk
3 months ago

I’d be interested in checking out the four door when it is time to replace my A5 Sportback. The four door fastback has been the perfect compromise for me as 90% of my driving is my solo work commute, but the other 10% is driving the kids and their kid stuff around. Nice to see an EV sedan coming out that doesn’t have the amorphous blob styling that is trending lately.

Mike Smith
Mike Smith
3 months ago

The R/T has over 450 horsepower and all wheel drive, and can ‘only’ squeak out a 13 second quarter mile? That speaks to how heavy this car must be. I guess it makes sense; the car seems comparable in size and battery capacity to a Model S Long Range, and my trusty 1/4 mile calculator says that a 450 hp car weighing 4600 lbs would turn in a 13.1 second time, which is very close to Model S long range curb weight.
I’m afraid that also implies Model S Long Range levels of price, given the economics that underpin BEV cars. So we’re looking at a ~$100k R/T, and who knows what kind of upcharge beyond that for the Scat Pack. Ugh, I hate this vehicular future.

George Talbot
George Talbot
3 months ago

But won’t politics doom this no matter how good it is?

Spectre6000
Spectre6000
3 months ago
Reply to  George Talbot

The red hats will hate it because it’s electric. Sensible people will hate how hard Dodge is trying to appeal to the red hats. I want to like it, but that’s a bitter pill… Bitch slapping half your market to score points with the other half is really self-defeating… Especially once you realize which half it is that’s buying EVs of any sort, and which half isn’t out of spite…

Last edited 3 months ago by Spectre6000
George Talbot
George Talbot
3 months ago
Reply to  Spectre6000

I dunno I have a Mach-E which is a hoot to drive and before the red hats got their panties in a twist about it, it was just a fun-to-drive new novelty with a Mustang badge.

I deeply hate the red-hat-oil-company driven bullshit around EVs. I remember folks on the Mach E FB groups tracking down who was writing all this nonsense back when it started and it was literally the same PR people who were touting the health benefits of lead paint and cigarettes. A-holes.

I want my all-electric rip-your-face-off-instant-torque mid-life-crisis-machines without having to listen to unsolicited and unhinged MAGA advice about how I’m bringing on World Socialism, thank you.

Vee
Vee
3 months ago

The nose is too short is the problem. Pushing the windshield back, not just raking it back, would improve the looks so much. Right now you’ve got a 25/55/20 ratio for front surface, roof, rear surface. The outgoing Charger had a 35/40/25 ratio.
The rise in shoulder line right over the front wheels also screws it up, making it look like the car’s hunched forward slightly. Combine that with the shoulder line that fades towards the top of the front wheel arch and a new shoulder line extending from the A-pillar along the length of the hood and there’s a few visual tricks that are incongruous. The worst part is these design elements all pull from the 1973 Charger, although that Charger had the benefit of a long as fuck hood to make the hunch over the front wheels not so obvious. The roofline of the coupe version of this Charger also pulls heavily from the original 1966 fastback but smooths the shoulder out too much and doesn’t have the overhang behind the rear wheels to somewhat not make it look ungainly. The beginning of the B-pillar should be directly over the rear wheel centerline from a three quarters view, not behind it.

One thing I would massively change would be the blunt front beneath the headlights. Making a convex slop that curves in towards the wheels the further down it goes and removing the vents in place of dual foglights on either side would do so much to make it look less tall. The sculpt line on the fenders already visually pulls towards this, so it’s very bizarre that the actual panel on the bumper doesn’t follow it.

James Carson
James Carson
3 months ago

Looks good inside and out. Too little range, too large, heavy and Dodge for me. I am confused as to what Stellantis is trying to accomplish going down the same path as they’ve been on for the last several decades.

Hugh Crawford
Hugh Crawford
3 months ago

Is that a front wing? If not, what is it other than making the hood high for no reason? This design manages to make no sense and be ugly at the same time. I expect one or the other but usually not both.

Drunken Master Paul
Drunken Master Paul
3 months ago
Reply to  Hugh Crawford

My take is the same as the pre-production model: That grill is too narrow and kind of spoils it. To your point, I have no doubt that the hood isn’t high so much as it bends down to accommodate that silly narrow grill for aero purposes. The wing is an interesting twist but they needed to open that up closer to the original if they want a muscle car look. I don’t dislike it, and I would love to drive on, but this looks like they got an official Dodge ’69 Charger limited edition bath soap and showered with it a few times, then put it into production.

Last edited 3 months ago by Drunken Master Paul
Matt D
Matt D
3 months ago

Dodge’s new emblem looks like an updated version of Mitsubishi’s.

Gary Lynch
Gary Lynch
3 months ago

5800 pounds?

This is why I don’t like EVs….

Rust Buckets
Rust Buckets
3 months ago
Reply to  Gary Lynch

The old one was super heavy at like 4500lb. This is extremely heavy for this size car.

Attila the Hatchback
Attila the Hatchback
3 months ago

I’ve read several of these Charger articles today across different sites. This is by far my favorite, for both technical detail and opinion. Thanks, Thomas & Autopian.

Do You Have a Moment To Talk About Renaults?
Do You Have a Moment To Talk About Renaults?
3 months ago

Holy shit. This thing looks absolutely stunning. The 5 door not so much, but the coupe, oh my god. I don’t care for the wheels, but then again I tend to believe every car looks better in blacked out steelies, so I clearly have no taste in wheels.

Last edited 3 months ago by Do You Have a Moment To Talk About Renaults?
Austin Vail
Austin Vail
3 months ago

Blacked out steelies can look fantastic if done right. One of my favorite-looking muscle cars of the 60s, the Plymouth Roadrunner 440 Six-pack, came from the factory with black steelies and redline tires with the only other ornamentation being chrome lugnuts. Looks mean as heck IMO. I also kinda dig the black steelies with dog dish hubcaps that lots of police cars used.

Do You Have a Moment To Talk About Renaults?
Do You Have a Moment To Talk About Renaults?
3 months ago
Reply to  Austin Vail

Yeah, they look fantastic to me even when done wrong. I just love the bare-bones-ness of some black steelies – unpainted, just black primer, preferably. There’s some cars out there that I wouldn’t sully with steelies (Rolls Royce Silver Shadow, Renault Espace MK1, Volvo 940, Twingo and a few others) but the vast majority of cars I love, I prefer how they look in blacked out steelies.

Mike TowpathTraveler
Mike TowpathTraveler
3 months ago

Such smooth, sympathetic lines that echo the 1968 Charger. It has to be a Ralph Gillies design.

Here’s a crazed thought: this car is begging to be put back into the Nascar Cup circuit. But I wanna go one better crazy: put a 1960 Charger Daytona front nose cone and rear wing on this beast and run it exclusively in the restrictor race tracks like Daytona, Talledega and Pocono. Leave the standard issue Charger for the rest of the circuit. Nascar would help jumpstart alot of showroom sales with such an audacious move. I know, I know, I can dream.

Cops and Troopers are gonna love the 5 door version of the Charger!

Mike TowpathTraveler
Mike TowpathTraveler
3 months ago

Ummm. “put a 1969 Charger Daytona front nose cone and rear wing…”

Austin Vail
Austin Vail
3 months ago

That would make it so long I love it.

86-GL
86-GL
3 months ago

I am hardly the target demographic for this thing, but honestly I think it looks pretty cool. I bet it has quite the presence in person.

I can see how some people might find the styling a bit plain- Especially after a decade of increasingly aggressive and busy car design. Personally, I’m happy to see a manufacturer returning to a simpler, cleaner aesthetic. I’d say we’re about due for the design pendulum to swing back towards clean, the early 2000s were 20 years ago after all.

If simple isn’t your thing, you can just wait for Dodge to apply countless “special edition” graphics and trim packages.

I’m glad they actually decided to release a new sedan instead of turning this into a ‘charger crossover’. But at 6000lbs does it even matter? The range seems mediocre for the battery capacity. I would have hoped they could have extracted more aero out of the sedan shape. Maybe a lower performance, RWD only model will fix that in time.

Rust Buckets
Rust Buckets
3 months ago
Reply to  86-GL

It really doesn’t look plain, it’s about as fancy and detailed as the last one, but they ruined the beltline.

Jonathan Myers
Jonathan Myers
3 months ago

It is a bummer the range is poor. A large 4 door with a rear hatch is extremely flexible and great for road trips. I wonder why it is so inefficient compared to a Tesla Model S that has a very similar form factor.

Peter Thompson
Peter Thompson
3 months ago
Reply to  Jonathan Myers

Oh, nonsense.
The range is more than enough for the majority of car owners.

Jonathan Myers
Jonathan Myers
3 months ago
Reply to  Peter Thompson

The range is poor for a 100kWh battery pack sedan. It should be 350+. This is getting range numbers like it was an EV SUV.

Rod Millington
Rod Millington
3 months ago
Reply to  Jonathan Myers

Less so the range, more the poor peak charging speed. 180kW of peak charging in 2025 is just not acceptable.

Iotashan
Iotashan
3 months ago
Reply to  Jonathan Myers

If it’s significantly cheaper than comparable Model S, I could get behind the logic of slightly less range and slower charging. If they go with typical Dodge trim-gouging, then yeah, these are going to sit on lots.

Last edited 3 months ago by Iotashan
Rust Buckets
Rust Buckets
3 months ago
Reply to  Jonathan Myers

If you look at this side by side with a Model S, I think it will become clear why one uses much less electricity than the other.

PL71 Enthusiast
PL71 Enthusiast
3 months ago
Reply to  Rust Buckets

Yeah 325s and 6000lbs is not even in the same realm as a model S

Rust Buckets
Rust Buckets
3 months ago

And it’s wider and longer, and I suspect the drag coefficient is considerably worse than the remarkably low drag Model S.

Pajamasquid
Pajamasquid
3 months ago

Wagon-ize this a la Magnum, make it a PHEV, and at least one person will buy it.

Andy Individual
Andy Individual
3 months ago

So it appears they’re sticking to their core brand identity of wasting rubber. I sure hope very few people buy these.

JaredTheGeek
JaredTheGeek
3 months ago

I really just looked at the dimensions on this thing. Its longer than the outgoing model and even longer than a Dodge Durango. A 1970 Dodge Charger is longer though.

Ben
Ben
3 months ago

The controls for the heated seats? Capacitive touch. The method of killing traction control? An actual button within easy reach of the shifter.

But why is anything capacitive? Consumers have spoken and they’ve resoundingly rejected capacitive controls, and with good reason. This isn’t people wanting a better horse, dedicated capacitive buttons are worse in every way. You don’t even get them for “free” like you do a virtual button on a screen.

Maybe I’m just getting old (I am), but it seems like every “innovation” in car interiors these days is objectively worse than what we had before. I’m really starting to dread shopping for my next car because almost everything on the market right now has some stupid design feature that I abhor.

And screw you too, clouds! 😀

MikeInTheWoods
MikeInTheWoods
3 months ago
Reply to  Ben

I am car shopping now and fully agree. It’s at the point where there are some cars I’d like to check out but won’t because they are run by touchscreen. Volvo wagon Polestar I’m looking at you. The salesman had to “tap” things a few times to get them to work. I didn’t bother to test drive after that. It looks like 2024/5 models are bringing back some knobs and less rounded off cargo areas, so I’m just going to wait for a year. Or buy a restomodded old car.

Ben
Ben
3 months ago
Reply to  MikeInTheWoods

The salesman had to “tap” things a few times to get them to work.

That absolutely drives me nuts. “Look how responsive our screen is! *Tap*…*Tap*…*Tap* See!”

Spikersaurusrex
Spikersaurusrex
3 months ago

Wow, I like the looks of the 4 door hatch, but at 206 inches long, it won’t fit in my garage. And at nearly 3 tons – woof, no wonder the range is comparatively terrible. Is there a reason it has to be so stretched and heavy?

163
0
Would love your thoughts, please comment.x
()
x