Home » The 2024 Husqvarna Svartpilen 801 Is A 105 HP Stunning Motorcycle Ripped Straight From Your Future Dreams

The 2024 Husqvarna Svartpilen 801 Is A 105 HP Stunning Motorcycle Ripped Straight From Your Future Dreams

Husky Scrambler Ts2
ADVERTISEMENT

The riding season of 2024 is heating up faster than the outside temperature it is. Husqvarna wants to tear up your spring with its latest scrambler-inspired naked motorcycle. The 2024 Husqvarna Svartpilen 801 looks like it came 20 years from the future and for the first time ever, the company’s naked is getting a parallel-twin engine. Even better, the engine makes 105 HP, making it the most powerful bike Husqvarna is selling right now.

It’s sort of hard to classify what the 2024 Husqvarna Svartpilen 801 is. Husqvarna uses both naked and scrambler in its materials. The imagery of this machine kicking up rocks on a trail and the tagline of “the dark street explorer” don’t help things. What I can tell you is I can’t stop looking at it.

Vidframe Min Top
Vidframe Min Bottom

Despite the fresh looks, the Svartpilen has a lot of history behind it. Husqvarna is one of the older names in the motorcycle business and decades ago, the brand’s bikes were the preferred rides of some daring stars, from Husqvarna:

Svartpilen 801 2024 (57)

Svartpilen 801 2024 (3) (1)

ADVERTISEMENT

Husqvarna, originally a metal-working company, was founded in 1689 in the Swedish town of Huskvarna to produce muskets for the nation’s army. The production of motorcycles began in 1903 by introducing the first motorised bicycle. During the 1920s and 1930s, Husqvarna Motorcycles built competitive street motorcycles and by entering prestigious road racing events such as the Isle of Man TT, the brand quickly established itself in Europe. Through the years that followed, multiple, high-performance 2-stroke and 4-stroke engines were developed and between 1960 and 1963, five FIM World Championship titles were won with Husqvarna machinery across both the 250 cc, and 500 cc categories.

After helping to establish the sport of motocross in Europe, Husqvarna Motorcycles paved the way in taking the sport to the USA. Among the high-profile Husqvarna Motorcycles riders from the successful 1960s and 1970s era were Torsten Hallman, Malcolm Smith, and Hollywood actor Steve McQueen.

In 1977, the brand joined Sweden’s Electrolux Group and six short years later, Husqvarna’s 500 cc, 4-stroke motocross model set the benchmark for offroad performance. The exceptionally light and easy-handling motorcycle was revolutionary and the machine of choice for many competitive racers. In 2007, Husqvarna Motorcycles was briefly acquired by the BMW Group before joining PIERER Mobility AG in 2013.

A Storied Name

Silverpilen 12 Ad Swe 55

A notable point in Husqvarna’s history was the 1955 Silverpilen, or “Silver Arrow” in Swedish. It was powered by a 175cc two-stroke engine that made just 9.5 HP, but the little bike was a technological step forward and a riot. Part of this motorcycle’s magic was the fact that, in order to qualify for Sweden’s “Lightweight Machine” classification, Husqvarna engineers were forced to build the motorcycle with a lot of lightweight alloy materials. The Silverpilen weighed right around 165 pounds (75 kg) with a full tank of fuel, permitting 16-year-olds to be able to ride the machines.

Sure, these were bikes with two-ply tires, a frame that couldn’t handle the power, and brakes that were easily overwhelmed, but the Silver Arrow was a hit. Tuners quickly began converting them into competition-dominating racers. Today, Husqvarna says the old Silverpilen was a pioneer of motocross and an important vehicle for the future developments of the Husqvarna brand. Eventually, off-road machines became such a big business for Husqvarna that, since the 1960s, it let street bikes go by the wayside.

57 Ad Hqv Silverpilen (1)

Over that time, racers on Husqvarna motorcycles racked up 11 Baja 1000 victories, 15 Motocross World Championships, and 24 Enduro World Championships. About 50 years later, Husqvarna decided it was time to dip its toes back into street bikes. In 2011 and 2012 while under BMW’s ownership, Husky sold the Nuda 900R. In 2014, Husqvarna decided to try again. It displayed prototypes of its KTM-based Vitpilen 401 (White Arrow) and Svartpilen 401 (Black Arrow), thus reviving the old Arrow name. The 701 Supermoto kicked off Husky’s road bike rebirth and the Vitpilen 401 and Svartpilen 401 joined in 2018.

ADVERTISEMENT

These two bikes were largely the same, differing mostly in color and riding position. The dark Vitpilen had clip-ons for a café racer vibe while the lighter Svartpilen set you up for a more upright flat-tracker-inspired ride. Underneath the stunning four-piece bodywork were chassis and engines borrowed from the KTM 390 Duke.

E24pz4srnvhubbh74tfe47v6n4

These bikes also got larger, more powerful models in the form of the Vitpilen 701 and Svartpilen 701. Once again, both bikes get KTM bones and a KTM 690 Duke engine. The smaller 401s made 44 HP while the 701s got 75 HP. All of them were big thumping single cylinders, too, until now.

The Svartpilen 701 and its Vitpilen sibling were discontinued in 2021, after just two and a half years of production. Thankfully, Husky hasn’t forgotten about the bigger bikes and now the Svartpilen is back and better than ever.

The 2024 Husqvarna Svartpilen 801

Svartpilen 801 2024 (56)

ADVERTISEMENT

Svartpilen 801 2024 (59)

A couple of days ago, Husqvarna lifted the covers off of the 2024 Svartpilen 801 and it’s a bit more than just an evolutionary update.

The biggest news about the Svartpilen 801 is its powertrain. Gone is a big thumper and in its place is a 799 cc, parallel-twin LC8c engine. It’s making 105 HP and 64 lb-ft of torque sent to the rear wheel through a chain, which matches the Norden 901 adventure bike for the most powerful motorcycle in the Husky lineup, at least in terms of horsepower. But here’s the thing, the Svartpilen 801 is also a pretty low 399 pounds dry.

2024 Husqvarna Svartpilen 801

Husqvarna says this motorcycle is “all-new,” but it does seem to share some family resemblance with the KTM 790 Duke and 790 Adventure/R given the use of the LC8c engine. Like the Duke, the Svartpilen also features a steel frame, a cast alloy swingarm, and WP Apex suspension. This isn’t surprising, given the fact that Husqvarna and KTM are under the same corporate parent and Husky’s models have long featured KTM gear in new, hot bodies.

ADVERTISEMENT

Before we move on from that engine. Husqvarna says it’s designed to deliver thrifty fuel economy and long, 9,320-mile (15,000 km) service intervals. Of that 399-pound weight? The engine is a little more than a quarter of it at 114.6 pounds.

Utoejya3qzcazchpxijbi3skhe

Another big change happened to what the engine is bolted up to. Gone is the trellis frame and in is a chromium-molybdenum tubular steel frame connected to a one-piece cast aluminum subframe. Husqvarna says this new hydroformed and laser-cut frame is simpler but allows for the motorcycle to have a perfectly balanced power-to-weight ratio as well as a “precise balance of flex and rigidity.”

Holding the shiny side up is an adjustable WP Apex 43mm inverted cartridge fork with 5.5 inches of travel. In the rear is an adjustable WP Apex monoshock with 5.9 inches of travel. Something notable with this setup is that Husqvarna does provide the tools to do suspension adjustments. Nice.

Svartpilen 801 2024 (28)

ADVERTISEMENT

The show is stopped by a pair of J.Juan (a Brembo company) four-piston calipers clamping down on 300mm rotors. A J.Juan two-piston caliper brings up the rear, chomping on its own 240mm disc. The Svartpilen 801 comes equipped with lean-sensitive Bosch ABS that can be disabled in the rear and a Supermoto ABS mode for a more sporty ride.

Those brakes are attached to new 17-inch wheels. Gone are the spoked arrangements from before and now you have lighter cast wheels shod in Pirelli MT 60 RS tires. The wheelbase has also been changed compared to the old Svartpilen 701, going down from 56.5 inches to 54.6 inches.

2ffc35wagbgvja2ee4itj562oi

There’s a lot of tech to like, too. In addition to fresh LED lighting, you get a 5” TFT display with Husqvarna’s Connectivity Unit. When paired with the Ride Husqvarna Motorcycles app, this can give you turn-by-turn directions as well as control calls and music. In addition to the aforementioned ABS, you also get adjustable traction control, ride-by-wire, and four riding modes. The optional Dynamic Pack adds what Husqvarna calls the “Motor Slip Regulation (MSR) for controlled deceleration with the Anti-Wheelie mode limiting the maximum wheelie angle for extra safety.”

Svartpilen 801 202wheels4 (57)

ADVERTISEMENT

Other standard features include a Power Assist Slipper Clutch for controlled hard deceleration and an up-and-down quickshifter. There are also reversible handlebar mounts with an adjustment range of 7mm. You get all of this in a motorcycle with a 32-inch seat height and a respectable 6.85-inch ground clearance.

Road Or Dirt

Svartpilen 801 My25

I find myself back at the question of figuring out what kind of bike it is. Husqvarna clearly wants you to know the 2024 Svartpilen 801 is a road warrior, but the company also wants to suggest that you could take this bike into the dirt. The Pirelli MT60 RS tires worn by the Svartpilen 801 are sold as dual-sport tires but with a 60 percent bias towards the road.

Svartpilen 801 2024

So, this is a motorcycle that’s at home on the road, but shouldn’t be a complete embarrassment should you decide to have a little off-pavement fun. Just, don’t expect motocross performance here.

ADVERTISEMENT

The price also seems pretty decent for what you’re getting. The starting price of the 2024 Husqvarna Svartpilen 801 is $10,899 and sales begin in the United States in June 2024. Sure, this motorcycle has a lot of KTM parts from the brakes and suspension to the engine, but it’s wrapped in a page that you could stare at all day. And with that promising spec sheet, this motorcycle should live up to a name that’s won so many races. The only problem will be finding the perfect gear to match the fantastic look.

(Images: Husqvarna Motorcycles

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on whatsapp
WhatsApp
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on reddit
Reddit
Subscribe
Notify of
38 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
John Patson
John Patson
27 days ago

That seat looks awfully thin for a road bike. Never understand why so many bikes have such terrible seats.

Chris Moore
Chris Moore
27 days ago

I saw this press release and my first thought was “I don’t need another Husky!” I’ve already got a 901 Expedition, but been pondering something with better stop/go road manners for commuting. Then, soon, I’m also getting a second bike for free…a 97 TL1000s. Low miles, museum condition, been sitting for a bit so needs a fuel system clean and that’s it. Should be able to get it running, registered and licensed for less than 2 benjies. Again, not very commutable…so I don’t need a 3rd bike either. LOL

That said, the CFMoto engine build doesn’t bother me really. They have been building motors for KTM and Kawasaki for a while now. Europe has been getting their engines longer than we have. I’m also very curious about the Ibex 450 for my wife. That’s a LOT of bike for 6500.

No Kids, Just Bikes
No Kids, Just Bikes
27 days ago
Reply to  Chris Moore

I have a TLS! There’s a lot of info in the forums, as these bikes are from a time when the forums were active. My injectors need to be cleaned for this riding season. Oh! And I need to switch out the F1-style rotary damper on the rear. Like most, mine failed and now the rear end just bounces. Give that a look before any spirited rides.

After that look into a Timing Retard Eliminator, as Suzuki programmed these to rev slower in the first two (three?) gears.

Chris Moore
Chris Moore
27 days ago

I have poked at a couple of the forums. Any suggestion which is the best one for info? Definitely found some good info but would rather one site versus several.

As far as I know the damper is still in good shape. The guy passing it on took RELIGIOUS care of it and just stopped riding. It’s been in the garage, gas drained, and all for 5 years. Until then he was riding it regularly. Not looking forward to it’s failure, though, since almost any replacement to a standard shock is gonna hit the pocketbook hard. lol That said, it’s a 97 so it is the reason for the retard roll on ignition addition. 98-00 (maybe only to 99) had it because of the “widowmaker” test ride that killed the journalist during a review ride.

No Kids, Just Bikes
No Kids, Just Bikes
26 days ago
Reply to  Chris Moore

There were two that I used pretty regularly…tlzone and tlplanet. Congrats on the damper. I have put off on the repair -using an ebay kit I hope works- because lifting the bike is a pain. Can’t jack from the bottom with the exhaust on, and you can’t use a rear wheel stand because it compresses the suspension. I am thinking about an engine hoist to just lift by the subframe at this point.

I also got a 1/4 turn throttle insert on those forums…I think the username was ‘rifleman’ made them. 1/4 turn for full throttle with a -1 front sprocket makes for a rowdy machine! Have fun! They’re heavy, but nothing beats a sporting vtwin…When a supermoto won’t do.

Freelivin1327
Freelivin1327
27 days ago

I always forget Husqvarna makes motorcycles…I have one of their weedeaters which is great but Echo and Stihl are better- well, as far as lawn equipment goes. Their chainsaws are supposed to be good too

Speedway Sammy
Speedway Sammy
27 days ago

Not a biker guy in my old age, but as an engineer have to appreciate the design of this. It just looks right. Props to Husqy.

Fix It Again Tony
Fix It Again Tony
27 days ago

$10k for either this or XSR900. Hmm …

Scott Sullivan
Scott Sullivan
27 days ago

In the 70’s and 80’s we would buy the bikes with the largest motors we could find, tear off stuff, add clipons and rear sets. They were ugly and a blast to ride. The Svartpilen 801 is what I would build if I were a teenager today. Tested one out and it does not fit neatly into a category. It is a mutt in all the best ways.

Adrian Clarke
Adrian Clarke
28 days ago

I desperately want a 701 Supermoto, but I feel it would be both too much and too little bike for what I want (and for a returning rider). I learnt to ride on an SMS125 and would dearly love another, but they appear to be non-existent in the UK now so it would involve taking a van to the continent to get one.

No Kids, Just Bikes
No Kids, Just Bikes
27 days ago
Reply to  Adrian Clarke

Were Yamaha WRs street legal over there? Modern Japanese fuel injection on a not-too-big bike could be a decent alternative.

Adrian Clarke
Adrian Clarke
27 days ago

There’s a WR125X four stroke I had completely forgotten about. The enduro models are not road legs (although I would imagine a few have been converted).

No Kids, Just Bikes
No Kids, Just Bikes
26 days ago
Reply to  Adrian Clarke

Do it. Then put a hitch-mount carrier on the ‘Rari to haul it to track days. Win life and the internet.

Spikedlemon
Spikedlemon
28 days ago

There’s a colleague with a 401 in the office that I absolutely love the look of.

This one? I’d toss those Pirellis in the trash and mount of up some proper sporty and grippy road rubber. I know I’d never take it offroading in any anger, and if I did: the OEM rubber would be inadequate anyway. It’d be way more fun to rail it on ramps, and roundabouts.

However Husky, much like KTM, as a daily roadbike is a challenge due to the small brand dealer network and parts tend to be a bit dearer than an equivalent Honda or Yamaha.

Chris Moore
Chris Moore
27 days ago
Reply to  Spikedlemon

Wait for the Svartpilen. It’s almost certain to follow. It will be the urban exporer. This one is more scrambler. The Svart will have racier tires.

No Kids, Just Bikes
No Kids, Just Bikes
27 days ago
Reply to  Chris Moore

Svart – scrambler with knobbies and dirt bike bars
Vit – cafe racer with sticky tires and clip on bars.

Jim Stock
Jim Stock
28 days ago

Seems like a great bike at a great price. Not a fan of that tail with the lights and signals. I get why but is not the best looking part of the bike. I would love one of these bikes in my garage.

Scott Ross
Scott Ross
28 days ago

Ive been wanting an RNineT Scrambler but this might be a good alternative

Nick Weaver
Nick Weaver
28 days ago

Is this the Chinese built engine or one made in Europe?

OCS-BN
OCS-BN
27 days ago
Reply to  Nick Weaver

I believe the KTM/Husky 800cc twin is build in China at CFMoto.

Bill Ozinga
Bill Ozinga
28 days ago

I have a Svartpilen 401 in Costa Rica and it is an absolute blast to ride here. The performance is more than adequate for the roads, it’s comfortable, hangs with the Adventure Dad Bikes on the gravel roads, and is just a stunning looking bike. I honestly don’t miss my R1200GS a bit.

Gubbin
Gubbin
28 days ago
Reply to  Bill Ozinga

Living the friggin’ dream there. Haven’t been to CR since the 90s but it seems like a great terrain for a light scrambler.

No Kids, Just Bikes
No Kids, Just Bikes
27 days ago
Reply to  Bill Ozinga

This is the way.

OCS-BN
OCS-BN
27 days ago
Reply to  Bill Ozinga

I have a 401 Vitpilen, but converted it to more humane handlebars. I agree, it is super fun on narrow roads. I love the two-strokeish power delivery. Not much happening until 7,000rpm. Then it just explodes and pulls into the five digit rpm in no time. On longer trips this becomes tiring, though. Owning a second, larger displacement bike for longer trips is useful.

No Kids, Just Bikes
No Kids, Just Bikes
28 days ago

I like the husky ‘pilens a lot. I think they lose a bit of their magic as they size up, though. This latest one is like a regular standard motorcycle trying to channel the cool looks of the svelte 401.

I love the 401 Svart.
I like the 701.
This is inoffensive.

Jdoubledub
Jdoubledub
28 days ago

Nailed it. I was obsessed with the 401’s when they first came out, but looking at the 701 and 801 I feel absolutely nothing.

Fatallightning
Fatallightning
27 days ago

I think the 701 looks great on the spoked wheels, less so on the cast wheels. The short and stubby 401 looks great. The 801 looks very generic, I think the loss of the trellis doesn’t help. The originals look like concept bikes, the 801 looks like the watered down production version of the cool concept.

No Kids, Just Bikes
No Kids, Just Bikes
27 days ago
Reply to  Fatallightning

Agree on all points.

Andrew Wyman
Andrew Wyman
28 days ago

Ooo. Mercedes…..why do you do this to me. I had been fine not needing a bike, but now you drop things like this into my life?

Rad Barchetta
Rad Barchetta
28 days ago
Reply to  Andrew Wyman

I know, right? I thought I had motorcycles out of my system 20 years ago, but thanks to Mercedes, I’m headed for a divorce because I’m gonna need to have these things in my life. 🙂

Skurdnee
Skurdnee
28 days ago

Wonder how close this twin is to the 798cc that was in my BMW F800R. That was the era that Husqvarna was owned by BMW. I loved that engine; didn’t sound the best but it was silly quick all across the rev range and in just about every gear, which was great for daily driving. Even at the track I could best the I4s out of the corner (before being left in the dust on the long straights). I beat the shit out of that thing and it never complained.

Spikedlemon
Spikedlemon
28 days ago
Reply to  Skurdnee

Interesting complement to the F800 engine. I disliked it on a test ride due to the NVH; it felt far too unrefined next to the rest of the package. But I did appreciate that it was rather easy to ride. FWIW at that time I had a few bikes with singles, (sport) Vtwins, and fours.

Mechjaz
Mechjaz
28 days ago
Reply to  Skurdnee

Hey, I’ve got a F900 XR! I wanted the R but my legs made an unsustainably acute angle to even get through the test ride without pain.

It’s quick, but I feel like it’s clumsy at low speeds. Or maybe it has a funny clutch, or I’m bad at it. It’s almost like, with two cylinders, I manage to catch it between cycles (I know this is not actually what’s happening) and it feels startled or unprepared for sustained low speed motion. Like we’re already out of needing the clutch at ~3000, why are you balking when I throttle up again?

Skurdnee
Skurdnee
27 days ago
Reply to  Mechjaz

Come to think of it, I had installed a Boosterplug on it that really helped a lot with fueling at low speeds.

Mechjaz
Mechjaz
27 days ago
Reply to  Skurdnee

Damn, I know you just said it helped, but is it the real deal? It seems too good to be true. That’s exactly what’s it’s like – like it’s starving at low speeds. I guess I’m imagining FuelShark and suspicious of anything that promises to simply plug in and, you know, do anything.

Skurdnee
Skurdnee
27 days ago
Reply to  Mechjaz

I had that bike for six years, three or four of which had the Boosterplug installed. I never did a dyno test or anything like that but it really did wake up the bike at lower speeds, which was huge for me being that I did the majority of my riding around town. Certainly worth it on that bike.

Mechjaz
Mechjaz
27 days ago
Reply to  Skurdnee

Hell yeah, I’ll look into it. Thanks!!

Fatallightning
Fatallightning
26 days ago
Reply to  Skurdnee

I don’t any relation exists. The Husky parallel twin is the same as the KTM, the 270* firing order being one huge differentiator to the 360* in the Bmw.

38
0
Would love your thoughts, please comment.x
()
x