Home » The 111 Horsepower 2025 Indian Scout Is The Company’s Biggest Reveal Ever. Here’s What You Need To Know

The 111 Horsepower 2025 Indian Scout Is The Company’s Biggest Reveal Ever. Here’s What You Need To Know

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Back in 2011, a storied name in American motorcycling was born again. Indian Motorcycle is back and better than ever. The brand built its modern reputation on excellent machinery like the historic Scout. That cruiser has been the most important vehicle for Indian Motorcycle and now, after a decade of being one of the coolest mid-size options on the market, it’s time for the Scout to evolve. Indian has announced an all-new, bombastic cruiser that’ll make you want to cruise down the open road. Let’s take a gander at this big deal.

Last year, I said that the revival of Indian Motorcycle is one of the greatest things to happen in American motorcycling and I stand by what I said. Indian is giving Harley-Davidson some fierce American competition and that’s great for motorcyclists. Whether you ride orange or don black and red, both brands are building beautiful, powerful steeds.

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Now, it’s time for Indian to show off the newest iteration of its best-selling motorcycle.

2025 101 Scout 16

Scout’s Origins

This is a story over a century in the making. While the Polaris-owned Indian Motorcycle is a more recent phenomenon, the company has been off and on trading barbs with Milwaukee’s Harley-Davidson for over 100 years. That competition continues today, with Indian Motorcycle pointing out that it was founded two years earlier than the famous Motor Company. Of course, Harley gets to say it’s been around this whole time, while Indian wasn’t as lucky.

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The Scout story starts with Irish electrical engineer and racer Charles Bayly Franklin. Before he designed the Indian Scout, Franklin worked at a power station and would be known best for his racing career. Franklin entered every Isle of Man Tourist Trophy race from 1908 to 1914. With exceptions for 1910 and 1912, Franklin finished in the top 10 of every TT he entered during that time. He’s noted for switching to Indian motorcycles in 1910. Unfortunately, his Indian experienced a tire failure, which is why he could not finish the 1910 Isle of Man TT. Franklin also took an Indian to Brooklands, where he became the first man to cover 300 miles in 300 minutes. In those days, Indian motorcycles were known for their outright speed and domination in competition.

Franklin would later become an Indian dealer for a short time before heading over to America and working in Indian’s design department in Massachusetts. In 1919, Franklin would pen one of his greatest designs with the 1920 Scout, a motorcycle with a short double cradle frame and a low 370-pound weight. Saddled to the frame was Franklin’s side-valve V-twin engine and a transmission bolted to the engine. A highlight of the Scout powertrain was its geared primary drive, which gave the Scout greater reliability than other motorcycles of the time.

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The Scout was an instant hit, not only bringing new riders into the fray but giving racers a reliable and fast platform. Scouts found themselves all over American roads and racetracks, plus at the hands of daredevils performing stunt shows riding the motorcycles around vertical walls.

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In 1928, the Scout would get even better with the 101 Scout. Franklin made a number of small changes that added up to create a motorcycle that would become the definitive Indian motorcycle for many. The 101 Scout had a new frame featuring an increased fork rake angle, the seat got a little lower, and the wheelbase got longer. This motorcycle would remain in production until just 1931, but it became and remains one of Indian’s all-time most famous motorcycles.

1929 101 Scout 05

The Scout itself would become one of Indian’s defining models. Racers continued taking Scouts to victory and famously, Burt Munro’s 1967 land-speed record was on a Scout.

The modern Scout was introduced in 2014 and it was a leap forward for mid-size cruisers. The new Scout rode low to the ground with a seat just a touch over 25 inches above asphalt. Its burly 69 cubic inch V-twin made 100 HP and 72 lb-ft of twist, burying Indian’s friends from Milwaukee, and like the Scouts of old, gears got power from the engine to the transmission, not a chain. Indian Motorcycle wrapped it up in a cast aluminum, stressed-member chassis, too, giving this cruiser some streetbike cred.

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Indian Motorcycle says the Scout has been a sensation. Over 100,000 units have been sold over the past decade and the company says its modern era includes 200,000 customers, 300 rider chapters, and a healthy market share of the mid-size cruiser market. To elaborate on that, Indian says the Scout has a 20 percent share of the mid-size cruiser market and 93 percent of those who buy a Scout a new to Indian Motorcycle. Meanwhile, 28 percent of Scout buyers are new to motorcycling. The company says that the Scout makes up a whole 40 percent of its volume, too. So, it’s time to go even further.

Improving On An Already Great Bike

Ola Stenegard, Director of Industrial Design for Indian Motorcycle, described that making the all-new Scout started with a design with a clear link to the past, but throttled into the future. Stenegard noted that the new Scout is an evolution, not a revolution.

2025 Scout Bobber Limited Black Smoke Reads

You’ll see a long, graceful curve that starts at the front of the new tank, follows its line to the frame, and continues through the rear shocks to the rear wheel. Other design notes include the stubby front and rear fenders, the iconic shape of the V-twin, and the motorcycle’s frame, which gently curves as it heads for the handlebars. While this motorcycle looks new, Indian was quick to point out how all of this voluptuous machine follows the lines of a century of Indian motorcycles. We’re also told that some of the inspiration behind this new design was classic American cars, too. The Scout’s designers say they kept it old-school, working with clay models to get their design just right.

Indian says all of this is new, from the tube steel frame, to the new steel mid-frame and the steel subframe on the rear. Now, hold on a minute, didn’t I say the previous Scout utilized cast aluminum for its frame? Wouldn’t steel be a step back?

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Indian’s representatives say not so fast, because it found that Scout owners love modifying their motorcycles. Some of the mods would be mild, while custom motorcycle builders would go wild, chopping up the frame to make their own custom creations. Indian believes going to a steel frame will make modifications easier for everyone.

Cradled in this frame is Indian’s new 1250cc liquid-cooled SpeedPlus 1250 60-degree V-twin engine. This engine has four valves per cylinder and semi-dry-sump lubrication.

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It drinks premium fuel, has a compression ratio of 12.5:1, and has a gear drive primary system. In its base form, it fires 105 HP and 82 lb-ft of torque to the rear wheel through a six-speed manual transmission and a belt final drive.

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If you buy a 101 Scout, or buy a dealer-updated engine software tune to other Scout models, you can get that engine up to 111 HP and the same torque output as before. We’ll talk about the 101 Scout later.

The Lineup

2025 Scout Lineup

The 2025 Indian Scout is being offered in five different models and three trim levels.

The lineup begins with the Scout Bobber. This motorcycle is the stripped-down version of the Scout with a design focus on highlighting the SpeedPlus engine’s power and the Scout’s imposing stance.

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The Scout Bobber is blacked out with minimal bodywork. Highlights include a headlight nacelle, a slammed two-inch suspension, bar end mirrors, and a gunfighter-style solo seat. Basically, the Scout Bobber is for the rider who doesn’t want to adorn their bikes with anything other than the absolute minimum to look good.

Next is the Indian Sport Scout. This one is still murdered out like the Scout Bobber, but you’re getting some gloss black parts here rather than the matte black of the Scout Bobber.

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Indian notes the addition of six-inch moto-style risers with machine highlights, machined triple clamps, and moto-style handlebars. Other changes include a sport seat with some back support for longer rides, a quarter fairing, and a 19-inch front wheel. Most Scout models have 16-inch wheels front and rear with thick rubber, but the Sport Scout and the 101 Scout get 19 inchers up front. The Sport Scout and 101 Scout also get Metzeler Cruistec tires while the other models ride on Pirellis.

For those wanting a classic riding experience, there is the Indian Scout Classic.

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Blacked-out parts are swapped for chrome and the minimal fenders of the other models are replaced with long, full-size classic-style fenders. Indian also notes relaxed riding ergonomics, wire wheels with Pirelli Night Dragon tires, and bright paint. The engine is still making 105 HP here, so it’s not a ride that is as slow as it’s trying to look, but it’s a nod to the past.

Indian Motorcycle knows a lot of folks would rather tour on a mid-size cruiser than get something huge and bulky, so the Super Scout is for those people.

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This one has some of the classic style of the Scout Classic, but now with better touring gear. That means a tall windshield, soft bags, wire wheels, and a passenger seat. I should note that this bike is the only Scout model that comes standard with a passenger seat. Like the Scout Classic, there’s some chrome on display here, and Indian notes that the windshield has a quick-release mechanism so you can change your bike’s look on the fly.

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Finally, we arrive at the flagship 101 Scout. Designed to be a nod to the 101 of the past, this Scout variation is red, black, and mean.

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As I noted before, the 101 Scout gets the engine tune standard. It also nets the aforementioned 19-inch front wheel. But it doesn’t end there, as Indian also added adjustable piggyback rear shocks, adjustable inverted front forks, and dual disk Brembo brakes. The gunfighter solo seat makes a return here, as do the six-inch moto-style risers, machined triple clamps, and moto handlebars.

The front brakes on the 101 Scout are two 320mm rotors clamped on by two four-piston Brembo calipers. A single 298mm rotor brings up the rear with its own single-piston caliper. A bunch of the changes with the 101 Scout are unavailable to other standard models.

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For example, all other Scout models get the same rear brake as the 101 Scout, but a single 298mm caliper up front with two-piston calipers. The other Scouts also don’t get the adjustable inverted fork, but standard non-adjustable telescoping forks. Non 101 Scout models also get dual shocks in the rear with preload adjustment. The Super Scout, Sport Scout, and Scout Classic have 4.7 inches of suspension travel up front and 3 inches of travel in the rear. The Scout Bobber reduces its rear suspension travel to just 2 inches while the 101 Scout has 5.9-inches of travel up front and 3 in the rear.

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All variations of the Scout come with a seat roughly 25 and a half inches off of the ground, a 61.5 inch wheelbase, and a rake of 29°. Trail is 4.8 inches for all models but the Scout Bobber, which has a trail of 4.9 inches.

As for trim levels, Scout Classic, Scout Bobber, and Sport Scout start on the Standard trim level, which gives you LED lighting, ABS, and an analog gauge.

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Step up to Limited if you want traction control, cruise control, a USB port, and three riding modes. If you want even more, the last trim level is Limited +Tech, which adds a 4-inch round touchscreen instrument cluster and Indian Ride Command.

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That system gives you GPS navigation, route planning, configurable gauges, traffic and weather alerts, bike stats, a bike locator tool, and more. This trim level also unlocks a push-button keyless ignition.

Indian notes that the 101 Scout and the Super Scout get this trim level standard, but other models can upgrade to it. Then there’s an expansive catalog of hundreds of parts from seats and seatbacks to lights, bars, windscreens, and more.

Indian’s Biggest Reveal In Its History

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Indian Motorcycle says this bike is the biggest product reveal in its history, and I believe it. For many, the Scout is Indian Motorcycle and as we said before, the bike makes up nearly half of its volume. So, the modern incarnation of Indian needs the Scout to rock to be successful.

At least what we’ve seen on paper today, I think the new Scout could be a hit out of the park.

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Of course, the big question is how much will all of this cost. Indian says the new motorcycle begins shipping in America in May before hitting the global stage in June. When it does, you can expect to pay $12,999 for the Scout Bobber, $13,499 for the Sport Scout, $13,999 for the Scout Classic, $16,499 for the Super Scout, and $16,999 for the flagship 101 Scout.

Upgrading your Scout Bobber, Sport Scout, and Scout Classic to Limited spec would cost you an additional $700 while Limited +Tech is an additional $1,700 from the base Standard trim level. Going up on trim levels also unlocks more colors.

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2025 Scout Bobber 08

We will get you a ride review as soon as we can. Until then, it seems Indian hit it out of the park again. The Scout looks stunning and I bet the power will more than back up the style. Of course, the greatest part is that American motorcycle riders will remain spoiled for choice. And it seems like a 2025 Indian Scout will be a good choice if cruisers are your jam.

(Images: Manufacturer.)

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Freelivin1327
Freelivin1327
12 days ago

I’ve never been into motorcycles as much, but still think they are pretty neat. I love the history behind them and the amazing designs. These are all so beautiful! My favorite is the Classic, it has just the right looks
Great article!

George CoStanza
George CoStanza
12 days ago

Indian makes some gorgeous bikes. I’d hoped the bike on the right in the headline pic was a new retro-spec Scout trim offering.

Xpumpx
Xpumpx
12 days ago

Nice bike, I’ll never forgive Polaris for abandoning Victory.

Tree L
Tree L
13 days ago

Going to be a tough sell without proper mid controls.

BolognaBurrito
BolognaBurrito
12 days ago
Reply to  Tree L

Virtually zero cruiser buyers have any interest in mid controls. Plus, with a seat height that low, you could never get a comfortable rider triangle and mid controls.

BolognaBurrito
BolognaBurrito
13 days ago

Still just 3″ of rear suspension travel? My god, that was one of the biggest complaints against the last generation. It was a damn good bike, but the suspension was just a total let down, and the geometry just made it hard to improve all that much because you couldn’t really increase travel.

That being said, the last generation looked better.

No Kids, Just Bikes
No Kids, Just Bikes
13 days ago
Reply to  BolognaBurrito

I test rode an FTR and promptly forgot all about the Scout. Actual suspension and mid controls! Revolutionary. I still think these look pretty OK as far as cruisers go.

No Kids, Just Bikes
No Kids, Just Bikes
13 days ago

I love these. They look great. I love that Indian used liquid cooling like a modern motorcycle. I don’t see how a move to aluminum frames is any kind of advancement, especially when their justification is ‘wild mods are possible’. More customs get more eyeballs (likely) get more sales, so I get it. But don’t pee on my leg and tell me it is raining.

Jac Camara
Jac Camara
13 days ago

No, they moved away from the aluminum on the last model. New one is steel

No Kids, Just Bikes
No Kids, Just Bikes
12 days ago
Reply to  Jac Camara

Right, I had that backwards. Whoops. Sentiment is the same, the move to steel is not a ‘feature’.

Is Travis
Is Travis
13 days ago

The round touchscreen is awesome retro-modern.

El Jefe de Barbacoa
El Jefe de Barbacoa
13 days ago

Super clean design, I’m a fan. This tempts me to jump back into motorcycle ownership after 20 years being safe, but the downside remains contemplating having to lay one of these down at the age of 48.

SageWestyTulsa
SageWestyTulsa
13 days ago

Same, same. I’ll be 48 in August, and sold my Ducati M750 way back in ’05 after commuting and roadtripping it for a couple of years, with a couple of close calls but no actual incidents. I’ve had offroad bikes and ridden friends’ bikes on the street in the years since, but to quote Bill Mauldin, “I feel like a fugitive from the law of averages.” Especially after observing the general and ongoing decline in traffic safety following the smartphone revolution.

But yeah, I see bikes like this and I’m still tempted.

Last edited 13 days ago by SageWestyTulsa
CSRoad
CSRoad
13 days ago
Reply to  SageWestyTulsa

Just do it.
I’m 69 and still riding, eventually I’ll have to quit if I get too sick or die.
I just ride on road now and ride by myself, the “freedom” is still there.
City traffic is bad, it’s always been bad, you’ve got leave room for them and keep your spidey senses working. Most rider accidents are still caused by the rider, just look at the vehicle stats for an eye opener.
Me? I’ve no realistic use for a 100+ hp cruiser, I don’t need the cool image or at least it can’t help me at this point. (-; Wouldn’t mind taking one for a spin though, dealers are not giving test rides on new bikes here unless it is one of the manufacturers’ shows, so there is an outside chance of it happening.

No Kids, Just Bikes
No Kids, Just Bikes
13 days ago

At 43 I certainly get the safety factor. I don’t want to need full-time care or to enjoy all my burritos in smoothie form. I even try to convince myself that a convertible is the same feeling, especially after being nearly flattened by a likely afternoon-drunk redneck in a clapped out brodozer last week.

But ‘had to lay her/it down’ is a term that makes my skin crawl. I’ve been riding on the street now (~23 years) longer than I haven’t and I have never had to do that.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D9stN-LJeuM

R Rr
R Rr
13 days ago

I’m the same age and I’ve been commuting on sportbikes for almost two decades (inline-4 sportbikes are not the best thing for commuting, especially in a big city like Chicago, which is why I finally switched to a KTM Duke last year). On top of the everyday close calls I’ve had 4 proper accidents, but destroyed gear was most of the damage, even though 3 of those were pretty high-speed.

I never thought about giving up riding and letting a bunch of morons win by taking riding away from me. As long as I pay attention to them and always wear all my gear, I’ll be fine.

You can always die getting out of bed, or have a piano land on you while walking down the street 🙂

Last edited 13 days ago by R Rr
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