Home » The 532-Horsepower Hybrid Porsche 911 GTS Is An Electrified Monster That Doesn’t Need A Wastegate

The 532-Horsepower Hybrid Porsche 911 GTS Is An Electrified Monster That Doesn’t Need A Wastegate

New 911 Hybrid Ts
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We knew this was coming. The 992.2 is here, and the new Porsche 911 GTS is going hybrid. Not only is it the first hybrid in the model’s lineage, it also features serious performance figures and properly intriguing engineering that ought to help ease some sports car diehards into the electrified age. Without further ado, let’s jump right into it.

Out back sits a 3.6-liter single-turbocharged flat-six making 478 horsepower and 420 lb.-ft. of torque on its own. That’s five more horsepower than the old GTS, but that’s not where Porsche’s stopping. It’s also added hybridization with a 1.9 kWh battery pack the size of a traditional 12-volt lead-acid battery and two electric motors — one in the mandatory eight-speed PDK dual-clutch automatic transmission, and one in the turbocharger to cut lag. Total output? A cool 532 horsepower and 449 lb.-ft. of torque, good for a claimed zero-to-60 mph time of 2.9 seconds.

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Knowing Porsche, that number’s likely conservative, so it’ll be interesting to see what figures independent parties manage. Oh, and another cool thing — the electric motor inside the turbocharger also functions as a generator, providing up to 11 kW of power and eliminating the need for a wastegate. As for fuel economy, expect WLTP combined fuel consumption of between 21.4 and 22.4 mpg depending on spec. Not bad. Granted, there is a total curb weight gain of 103 pounds with the new 911 GTS, but that likely isn’t all down to the hybrid system.

2025 Porsche 911 Carrera Gts Hybrid Copy

2025 Porsche 911 6

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For the 992.2 911 GTS, four-wheel-steering is now standard, along with 10mm wider 315-section rear tires and active aerodynamics. All of those things ought to add at least some weight, although Porsche has been cheeky and made the tiny rear seats zero-cost options on all trims, with the standard configuration being a two-seater.

2025 Porsche 911 Carrera Gts Hybrid 3

Speaking of new equipment, fresh headlight options move the signal lights off of the bumper, which ought to flatter a few fried egg 996 owners. Matrix LED headlights join the options list, while new taillights adopt a tweaked full-width light signature. In 911 tradition, there’s nothing dramatic about the new car’s visual changes, so it’ll take a trained eye to spot the 992.2 in the wild.

2025 Porsche 911 3

On the inside, the twist-to-start knob is gone, replaced by a starter button to the left of the steering wheel. However, the big news is that the analog tachometer is also gone, as the new Porsche 911 gets a 12.6-inch all-digital instrument cluster. While a downgrade in tactility, there’s a chance it’ll let drivers actually see all five gauges at once, but we’ll have to slide behind the wheel to be sure. Add in deeper CarPlay integration and a cooled wireless smartphone charging compartment, and the new Porsche 911 should be easier to live with than ever.

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24 Pag G188 911 Vorshooting 2001 A3 Rgb

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Don’t need the pace of the GTS? Same. Well, for now, there’s the new Carrera, and it’s received a few upgrades. There’s still a twin-turbocharged three-liter flat-six under the decklid, but it now features the intercooler arrangement from the 911 Turbo and the turbochargers from the old 911 GTS. Total output climbs by nine horsepower to 388, the claimed zero-to-60 mph time drops by a tenth of a second, and the base price rises by a whopping $6,045 including freight. Also, Guards Red is now a $1,500 option, because everyone knows dentists can afford it.

0936 Nevada Coupe U Crane Akos9626 Edit V02

2025 Porsche 911 Hybrid Cutaway

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At this time, Porsche hasn’t unveiled any other models in the new 911 range, although it’s not difficult to guess what’s coming. The Carrera S is inevitable, given the option of Carrera S wheels on the base Carrera, and it’s safe to count on a refreshed 992.2 Turbo, Turbo S, and GT3 at some point, although those last three models are all carryover cars for 2025. Given how Porsche launches cars, trims will be peeled back layer-by-layer, so expect to know a whole lot more about additional models come next year.

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Will Porschephiles embrace hybridization? It’s possible, seeing as the brand already offers two electric vehicles and a litany of hybrids. For the GTS trim of the new Porsche 911, electrification was the logical next step for better filling the spread between the Carrera S and the Turbo, and it should offer plenty of punch. Is it the best thing for engagement? We’ll have to see. While new GTS drivers certainly won’t be rowing their own gears, the potential for a hybrid system to aid powertrain response is something worth being curious about. Expect it to roll into showrooms by the end of this year at a starting price of $166,895 including freight.

(Photo credits: Porsche)

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Defenestrator
Defenestrator
19 days ago

Porsche should make an air-cooled hybrid 911, just to *really* screw with the “not a real Porsche” purists.

Stef Schrader
Stef Schrader
21 days ago

I wanna hoon the hybrid. Active aero is cool as hell. That packaging for the hybrid system is clever. Porsche’s been on that hybrid stuff before it was even a company and that flywheel-hybrid race car they had in the early ’10s kicked ass. I. Want. To. Hoon. This.

I think they’ll add a manual trim later, but it’s still disappointing that the base model remains sans manual. I’m not mad, Porsche, I’m disappointed. (That’s worse.)

I don’t get the haterade for the start button. A lot of y’all were already using those goofy key-replacement knobs already anyway. The key was on the right in the first place to save on the extra wiring during Porsche’s early days. Is a real key satisfying? Hell yeah, it is. Have Porsche keys been satisfying ever since they ditched the metal key bit? Not really. If you want that real real, get a 997 or earlier. (Now watch me leave this post to ooh and aah at the Ineos Grenadier’s real metal key.)

I’m also not sad about the dashboard. The center tach flanked by screens in the 992.1 looked kinda goofy. Either give us the five separate gauge pods or commit to the screen bit. I do appreciate that they have a five-pod view for the screen, though. That warms my nerd heart.

My biggest beef with the 992.1 (besides its size—it’s just gotten too big and the 718 is where it’s at now) was that some parts felt…cheap? Flimsy? Y’all are charging how much for these now and the frunk release feels like…that? Get it together, parsh.

Oh, and the most important part:

Phew, they kept the round headlights. (I kind of miss separate marker lights, though.)

Last edited 21 days ago by Stef Schrader
Stef Schrader
Stef Schrader
21 days ago
Reply to  Stef Schrader

*Manual trim, as in, to the 992.2 lineup. The motor being in the transmission for the GTS pretty much rules one out there. (They should try anyway, though. Electrified low-end torque with a stick? Hell yeah, buddy, sounds like a recipe for sick burnouts for days.)

I drive a boring SUV
I drive a boring SUV
21 days ago

Manual is gone, traditional rev counter is gone, twist-knob starter is gone, no RWD-only version… I don’t care how much faster or more powerful the new GTS has got, it is no longer “the sweet spot” in the 911 range. After so many hours on the configurator dreaming of the day I hit the big jackpot, if it finally happens I guess I’ll take a 911T before they ruin that one too.

My Skoda is the Most Superb
My Skoda is the Most Superb
21 days ago

You can get the T-Hybrid system in the GTS in RWD flavor if you so desire. All other points ring true.

Defiant
Defiant
21 days ago

T officially gone from the website as of a few hours ago – but there are remaining allocations out there! Check Rennlist or start calling dealers if you truly want one. New T not announced and may be a few years if 991.2 and 992.1 release timeframes continue. (fingers crossed for a manual in it!)

I drive a boring SUV
I drive a boring SUV
21 days ago
Reply to  Defiant

Nah, it is all dependant on a lottery win 🙂 Realistically, I’m seriously considering selling a couple of motorbikes and trying to find a clean MR2 Spyder (W30)

Hangover Grenade
Hangover Grenade
21 days ago

So those $99 electric turbos on eBay were on to something!

V10omous
V10omous
21 days ago

Maybe not for the GTS, but it would be neat to see a return to natural aspiration paired with a hybrid system on base cars.

Goof
Goof
21 days ago

When 3500+ lbs for a 911 is something they crow about in press releases.

<sigh>

Everything has become so big and heavy. I know why (should get David Twohig to talk BEV weight with David — some DT+DT article?), but I don’t like it.

Amschroeder5
Amschroeder5
21 days ago

Love the article. CnD has a great set of additional technical details to reference btw.

Spikersaurusrex
Spikersaurusrex
21 days ago

I should have been a dentist. 🙂

Stoney got got (potentially)
Stoney got got (potentially)
21 days ago

No amount of money would make me ok with getting gleeked upon every day.

StillNotATony
StillNotATony
21 days ago

So there’s an electric motor to help the turbo spool up, and there’s no wastegate. I wonder if the boost that would be bled off by the wastegate could be used to drive that electric motor and recharge the battery?

Or would it be too much complexity for not a lot of gain?

Ecsta C3PO
Ecsta C3PO
21 days ago
Reply to  StillNotATony

That’s what it sounds like, I’d be interested in a deeper dive once we have more info. The core concept isn’t too complex if you’re already adding an electric motor, just let the boost spin the motor backwards and allow the battery to take that tiny bit of charge every time you lift off the gas.

Lotsofchops
Lotsofchops
20 days ago
Reply to  Ecsta C3PO

It seems very similar to F1’s MGU-H they have been running since 2014. Which is somewhat funny since Porsche hasn’t been in the sport since the 90s.

Amschroeder5
Amschroeder5
21 days ago
Reply to  StillNotATony

Caranddriver noted exactly this. Apparently it can generate about 20KW (15hp) to charge the battery and keep the turbo from overspooling. Anyways, losing 40 pounds from the engine, adding a 60 lb battery, the rest seems pretty marginal changes one way or another. This is a pretty clear sign that hybridization doesn’t have to be a huge weight penalty, and it isn’t as if each 911 gen is getting lighter regardless.

Amschroeder5
Amschroeder5
21 days ago
Reply to  Amschroeder5

10 KW sorry

Gubbin
Gubbin
21 days ago
Reply to  Amschroeder5

Also, with the new engine, didn’t they switch to an electric a/c compressor and remove the accessory drive?

Amschroeder5
Amschroeder5
21 days ago
Reply to  Gubbin

Yep

Defiant
Defiant
21 days ago
Reply to  Gubbin

And installed the water pump and other ancialliaries inside the engine and/or pdk. Great for packaging, not so much for servicing? If these become lease-only cars, that will lean poorly for the folks who buy these second-hand when (normally) prices dip!

Gubbin
Gubbin
21 days ago
Reply to  Defiant

NO USER SERVICEABLE PARTS INSIDE

(Though an external electric water pump would be nice for serviceability.)

Stef Schrader
Stef Schrader
21 days ago
Reply to  Gubbin

HA! I laugh in the face of complexity. No parsh can scare me.

(Except my 944’s crusty wiring harness. Fine. That part scares me.)

Nsane In The MembraNe
Nsane In The MembraNe
21 days ago

I love it and I want one…and before the insufferable NO MANUAL NO CARE crowd shows up, you’ll still certainly be able to get the stick in every 911 other than the GTS and Turbo variants. Porsche has said repeatedly that they’re going to keep offering manuals, so relax. I also think this is likely PDK only due to the fact that it’s easier to combine electrification with an auto.

Think of this as the ultimate touring 911 and it makes perfect sense. If you want crazier/more track capable you can get a GT3. If you’re an ICE purist this is literally the only electrified 911 in the lineup and you can easily avoid it. If you want the fastest 911 possible the Turbo S offers ludicrous speed. There is still a 911 for everyone, as god intended.

I personally think this is cool as hell and if I were to suddenly wake up with 200 large for a Parsh burning a hole in my pocket this is probably what I’d go for. I think there’s a good chance that it’ll be the best daily of the bunch. IMHO the Turbos are overkill at this point and as badass as the GT3 is it’s really a track day special at its core.

I’m excited to hear about how the new GTS drives. Also, keep in mind it actually has a bigger engine and only one turbo rather than two. It’s a 3.6 liter compared to the 3 liters in the base cars and S models…so you’re also getting more flat 6 goodness to go with the hybridization.

Last edited 21 days ago by Nsane In The MembraNe
Goof
Goof
21 days ago

Manual is no longer offered in the base Carrera either.

I also think the base Carrera is getting pulled from some markets?

So only the S and T have a manual, for non GT-department cars.

Nsane In The MembraNe
Nsane In The MembraNe
21 days ago
Reply to  Goof

Is that true? Unless that’s a change for the 992.2 the manual is currently a no-cost option in the base Carrera. PDK is indeed what it defaults to, but you or the dealership can spec a manual no problem.

Goof
Goof
21 days ago

The 992.1 base Carrera you can no longer spec a manual for the build as I expected — at least in the US configurator.. I also believe the Carrera S is being dropped from US offerings for the 992.2 as well, or at least that’s what Porsche has communicated for some time, and seems to be confirmed by today’s press release. You can get a T in the US going forward, presumably.

PDK take-rate outside the US keeps climbing, even for GT cars. The US is the global holdout for manual transmissions.

EDIT: So if GTS is PDK only, and base is PDK only, and Turbos have been PDK for a while… is it just T, GT3 and GT3 Touring left with manuals? Even then, the T, GT3 and GT3 Touring aren’t yet refreshed. Ruh-roh, Shaggy.

Last edited 21 days ago by Goof
Goof
Goof
21 days ago
Reply to  Goof

Take that back, S is coming.

However there’s no manual option for the 2025 base Carrera in the configurator. PDK is standard, but you cannot uncheck it. You can still order a 2024 Carrera with a manual possibly, assuming there’s build slots left before summer shutdown.

So S, T and GT3/GT3 Touring with manuals? If so, I’m curious what is planned for the next generation. They’re clearly looking to phase manuals out for newer cars. Clock is ticking…

Jack Beckman
Jack Beckman
21 days ago
Reply to  Goof

Base has not been available with a manual since the 992.1 came out. You needed to upgrade to the S to get a manual. Now you can also get a manual on the T.

Goof
Goof
21 days ago
Reply to  Jack Beckman

Yeah, base sans manual was what I recalled. I wasn’t entirely sure as I don’t pay attention to base 911s.

I mean, Porsche wanted to start phasing it manuals quite a long time ago. Early 2013 they showed off the GT3 as PDK only, and only when was there an uproar did they exercise their plan B. For the record, that’s what Porsche tends to do with their sports cars — they always have an escape exit they can use if things go south. Regardless, the expectation with the 991.1 GT3 was, “See, PDK only! PDK is the best! Ergo, you should only want PDK on your normal 911.”

The GT4 RS/Spyder RS were confirmed to not have received a manual due to not getting approval for the federalization and other testing related costs, as well as spending the time of folks they want on other things. The GT4 RS prototype was presented internally (at a birthday party) with a manual transmission back in 2016, but production never got approved.

The mid-engine RS cars are done in the EU/other markets after the 2024 MY due to cybersecurity regulations. They’ll be produced (along with some 718 variants) until Porsche is done with them. Manuals in the 992.2 will be based on existing commitments with suppliers signed years ago.

The 992’s successor likely won’t have a manual. At this point, folks have had 10 years warning of Porsche’s intent, and everyone who wanted their last manual likely bought one.

Ottomottopean
Ottomottopean
21 days ago
Reply to  Goof

I guess what we’ve seen more recently is how they are still paying for development of manual transmissions; my guess is we’ll see the first model year roll out as PDK-only and the new special edition with manual option (or manual only possibly) rolls out as either a base model or GTS possibly. They’ll charge extra for the manual and the dealers will mark up from there.

It hasn’t happened for the base model but numerous times for models like the GT3 and GTS in the recent past.

Goof
Goof
21 days ago
Reply to  Ottomottopean

Porsche hasn’t developed a new manual transmission since the 911R. The 911 S/T wasn’t a new manual, it was a new final drive ratio.

The 911R 6MT is the last newly developed MT from Porsche. It may be revised, but it’s the last all new transaxle architecture they’ll ever develop.

EDIT: To be specific, Porsche has the following manuals:

G81 – 981/982 Boxster/Cayman
G91 – Current 911 manual transmission

The G91 was derivative of the PDK transaxle. I believe this includes the 6-speed variants for the 911R, 991.2 and later GT3 and GT3 touring, 992 Sport Classic, and 992.1 S/T.

There will be no “new” manual transaxles after the G81 and G91. They will only be further revisions of G91. G91 debuted in 2011, G81 in 2012, and development started before 2010.

Last edited 21 days ago by Goof
Spikedlemon
Spikedlemon
21 days ago

they’re going to keep offering manuals

For now. (quickly pan to a view of tanks traipsing through the Ardennes)

Stoney got got (potentially)
Stoney got got (potentially)
21 days ago

FYI, they aren’t paying enough for you to get a job here.

Nsane In The MembraNe
Nsane In The MembraNe
21 days ago

I have made multiple half assed to moderately serious attempts to work for Porsche in various capacities but my highly specific resume is a hard sell for trying to make a jump between fields.

Stoney got got (potentially)
Stoney got got (potentially)
21 days ago

ha!

Tell me about it, Train Conductor doesn’t hold much weight in the pharma industry.

Last edited 21 days ago by Stoney got got (potentially)
WaitWaitOkNow
WaitWaitOkNow
21 days ago

I bet you could kill it in sales though.

Nsane In The MembraNe
Nsane In The MembraNe
21 days ago

Brother my entire career has been in child and adolescent mental health lol. I’ve gotten to the point that someone has inexplicably put me in a director role and, against my best efforts to the contrary, am beginning to be considered somewhat of an expert in my specific professional community.

I’m nearing the logical “you can’t move any further up than this” point in the field…and while I really enjoy and care about the work, it’s goddamn taxing and the pay can only go so far. I may get one more “big” raise in the next year or two but after that it’ll pretty much be incremental raises forever.

I’ve got a kid due in a month and the wife and I want to have two. Eventually I’d genuinely like to sell out and do something specifically to make as much money as possible…for the kids, but also for me! But unfortunately (or fortunately, depending on perspective) my resume and skills are so highly specific that the couple of times I’ve shot my shot in another field I’ve essentially been received with a “you seem cool, but you should stick to what you do since you have a niche”.

I find it funny that you bring up Pharma. I have a family member who just hit it pretty big in that field and I’ve been bothering them for months about helping me find a role in that wretched but incredibly lucrative arena. Sadly they don’t think they can help. The same happened when my buddy who worked for Google said “oh no sweetie” when I asked him if he could help me find an in.

Maybe we just have to find a pile of money and open a Porsche dealership. I can handle the people side of things if you’re good with the numbers!

Stoney got got (potentially)
Stoney got got (potentially)
21 days ago

Great response! I genuinely hope all goes well with all the new happenings in your life. Pretty cool stuff. I know those thoughts well, lol.

I don’t want a Porsche dealership, though. If anything, I’d like to own the absolutely “no doubt” best Caddy store in the world. I’m talking the whole nine, bring on the Arabs for some summer sand mods while getting a pedicure. Bring on the pink ones for some young singer who wants felt pillows. Bring on Billy Joel. Bring on Ludicris. Bring on that dude that made Lollapalooza. Hell, bring on Athestimezers Jim Gaffigan.

That is the paperwork I’d sign off on. 🙂

JKcycletramp
JKcycletramp
21 days ago

Maybe consider the semiconductor industry, if your risk-reward calculation has some room for risk.

Stef Schrader
Stef Schrader
21 days ago

“Inexplicably” my 1.8-liter engine bay. Ya earned that expert rep somehow.

Stef Schrader
Stef Schrader
21 days ago

I would drop everything in a heartbeat and learn an entirely different language if I could work in parsh’s archives department. Just an incredible collection of parshness, down to like, sculpted chocolate 911s and what the team ate before Stefan Bellof laid down his ‘Ring record in 1983.

Healpop
Healpop
21 days ago

I think you’re right this is the best DD of the bunch. There was this little tidbit from the CnD writeup –

“Porsche says that when you floor the throttle from a dead stop, the new GTS covers 70.5 feet in the first two and a half seconds, compared to 47.6 feet for the old GTS”

I don’t have anything to compare that to, but it looks like the hybrid bits really improve response. Sounds like a lot of fun on the street!

Nsane In The MembraNe
Nsane In The MembraNe
21 days ago
Reply to  Healpop

That’s the advantage to hybrids/EVs/turbo’d cars with low end torque. I enjoy wringing out a naturally aspirated engine as much as anyone, but how often do you get a chance to do that on the street? Unless you live out where the population isn’t dense, probably not very much.

But you can enjoy something with low end torque all day every day. It makes traffic less of a chore, it makes passing a breeze, and it allows you to have a lot of fun in short bursts. That’s precisely where I think this 911 is going to shine. If you want a track Porsche specifically or have roads nearby that allow you to fully wring out an engine every day there are plenty of options.

But if you live in the city, commute, and deal with traffic like I do? This is the move.

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