Home » The Hybrid Porsche 911 Is Faster Than The Old GT2 RS

The Hybrid Porsche 911 Is Faster Than The Old GT2 RS

Hybrid 911 Ts2
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Enthusiasts have been awaiting the updated 911, chassis code 992.2, for years. What enhancements will Porsche make? How will they impact performance? Will the manual transmission stick around? Well, it looks like we’ll find out soon. The Porsche 911 is officially going hybrid, and we’ll know all about it on May 28.

Typically, the mid-cycle update of a 911 includes substantially new technology. The 997.2 saw the advent of a direct-injected engine that did away with pesky IMS bearing issues, the 991.2 marked the introduction of turbocharging to core models, and the big party trick of the 992.2 will be electrification. It was inevitable, really. Not only does electrification make regulatory compliance easier in today’s world of increasing emissions standards, it can also help turbocharged engines be more responsive. An electric motor can provide a kick of torque while the turbochargers are still spooling up, effectively eliminating lag.

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While torque fill isn’t the only way hybridization can make the new 911 quicker, it certainly helps. The new hybrid car with the optional Aerokit ran a Nürburgring Nordschleife lap time of 7:16.984 with Porsche hotshoe Jörg Bergmeister behind the wheel, which would make it quicker than a 997 GT2 RS, the range-topping widowmaker from 14 years ago. Sure, tire technology has also evolved substantially over that time period, but we’re at the point where regular 911s are absolutely stupid fast, to the point where you don’t need a much quicker car for the street.

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At this point, it’s unlikely that all main-line 911s will come with the high-voltage hybrid system, but don’t be surprised if 48-volt mild hybrid power spreads throughout the core lineup. Not only would an integrated starter-generator simplify the accessory drive and aid stop-start smoothness, it would also earn some brownie points with the EPA and should play nice with a manual gearbox. While other automakers have been busy killing off manual gearboxes due to low sales, Porsche customers have voted with their wallets, so there is financial incentive to keep a stick in the new 911.

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Porsche 911

As the 718 Boxster and Cayman head towards full electrification, the 911 might be both the last combustion-powered Porsche sports car and the last one available with a stick. In any case, we’ll know a whole lot more about the 2025 Porsche 911 come May 28, when the car will make a full debut. Check back here when that happens, because we’re going to absolutely nerd out over the 992.2.

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(Photo credits: Porsche)

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Stef Schrader
Stef Schrader
8 days ago

good parsh

DaFaRo
DaFaRo
9 days ago

At this point, is Porsche, not Tesla, the Apple of the automotive industry. I feel like their limiting their vehicles performance so they can offer more performance on the next iteration.

Acid Tonic
Acid Tonic
9 days ago

So they increased the tire size again :p

Cant believe how much shoe these cars run.

Goof
Goof
9 days ago
Reply to  Acid Tonic

Have they?

911s have been on 295s standard for a bit now (305s with optional wheels), though I agree, it’s too much tire. It’s the old sledgehammer approach to solving the problem like you’d expect out of a Camaro or a Mustang, though… it does work.

I agree though. I miss the days when 911s came on 215 rears.

Kill all tires!

Goof
Goof
9 days ago

Absolutely zero issue with this.

I’ve driven a Vonnen Hybrid 991.1 911 Carrera GTS with their Shadow Drive, and it was fantastic. Got all the usual NA 911 sounds, with a manual, with a monstrous amount of instant torque to rip out of corners like nothing else.

Musicman27
Musicman27
9 days ago

Hybrids make everything better!

Snikle
Snikle
9 days ago

I think we can live without the autoplay videos at the top.

Forbestheweirdo
Forbestheweirdo
9 days ago
Reply to  Snikle

Agreed. Not a fan, but I get their role in creating revenue, and I can’t fault these guys for trying to make money here. I also greatly prefer the muted autoplay video to the full screen pop up ads on other sites.

Angrycat Meowmeow
Angrycat Meowmeow
9 days ago

but we’re at the point where regular 911s are absolutely stupid fast, to the point where you don’t need a much quicker car for the street.

I get the point you were trying to make here, but considering most people get by in Camry’s, F150’s and CRV’s, “needing” something faster than a base 911 is absurd 🙂 It’s more about usability. My car is a little less than 0.5s slower in the 1/4 than a base 911 (11.9 vs 11.5) and it’s rare I get to open it up outside of the dragstrip. If I’m lucky I can give it the beans for a few seconds getting on the highway before I reach “straight to jail” speeds, so I end up at the track a few times a year to stretch its legs.

Musicman27
Musicman27
9 days ago

What car do you drive?

Angrycat Meowmeow
Angrycat Meowmeow
9 days ago
Reply to  Musicman27

an S5

Canopysaurus
Canopysaurus
9 days ago

Bill the Cat says “Thbbft!”

Data
Data
9 days ago
Reply to  Canopysaurus

But only Toonces can drive you home. TOONCES LOOK OUT!

Scott Ross
Scott Ross
9 days ago

will the Porsche people ban the hybrid cars from running on track like the Corvette people did to the E ray? Also isn’t the Eray faster than the base Corvette?

V10omous
V10omous
9 days ago
Reply to  Scott Ross

The E Ray is much faster and much more expensive than the base Corvette, yes.

Not sure how “Corvette people” can get a car banned from a track though?

Rad Barchetta
Rad Barchetta
9 days ago
Reply to  V10omous

They did it themselves is how. The National Council of Corvette Clubs banned hybrids and EVs at their sponsored events. This famously and unintentionally banned the E-Ray, too. They have since updated their policies to allow it.
(It’s important to note that this was not politically motivated in any way, but due to the fact that the facilities used did not have the training or equipment necessary to handle battery fires.)

Scott Ross
Scott Ross
9 days ago
Reply to  Rad Barchetta

I always thought is was a subconscious political thing, but the battery reason is a good one. My larger question is how does the FIA deal with hybrid electrical fires

Nsane In The MembraNe
Nsane In The MembraNe
9 days ago

I’m excited to see what this winds up being like. I, for one, welcome our new hybrid overlords.

Angrycat Meowmeow
Angrycat Meowmeow
9 days ago

You know I like my Audi’s and rumor is the B10 S/RS5’s will be hybridized. I’m eager for it.

Nsane In The MembraNe
Nsane In The MembraNe
9 days ago

If the 3 liter turbo V6 lives on I’d be all for it. It’s a great engine and it seems to be pretty sturdy. That 2.9 liter super and turbocharged V6 stresses me out though (pun intended).

Angrycat Meowmeow
Angrycat Meowmeow
9 days ago

I’m not aware of the SC/TC 2.9. The 2.9 in the RS5/S7 is a 2.9TT and is actually more stout than the 3.0 turbo, although when you start modifying them the 3.0 gets more bang for the buck. The main limiting factor on either of the EA839 variants is the fuel system. If they went for an MPFI + DI setup like on the EA837 the engine would be unstoppable, because everything else is very stout. 700+HP on a stock bottom end is doable and the timing system is very simple, especially compared to what most are used to seeing from VWAG.

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