Home » The New Dodge Charger Is A Coupe Again As God Intended

The New Dodge Charger Is A Coupe Again As God Intended

2025 Dodge Charger Daytona EV
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It feels like we’ve been waiting ages for the new Dodge Charger to drop, and a set of teaser photos recently published to Dodge’s social media platforms suggest that it’s very nearly here. Straight off the rip, a few things are obvious: It’s a coupe, it’s big, it looks almost exactly like the Dodge Charger Daytona concept, and its power source is rather ambiguous. For the people who’ve been complaining that Chargers only have two doors since 2005, your time has come.

Obviously, Dodge has done some work to partially obfuscate the look of the new Charger in these teaser photos, from choosing a grey car to positioning it behind a fence to shooting from a distance. However, there’s still a ton of cues we can pick out from the generous selection of teaser photos.

Vidframe Min Top
Vidframe Min Bottom

The front end looks a bit sad in these photos. Maybe the dreary January weather plays a role, but this front clip just doesn’t look as expressively malevolent as the old Challenger or the 392 and Hellcat Chargers with the stormtrooper front end. We’ve got two blocky headlights set into a horizontal grille-like element with one daytime running light bar connecting the two. Pretty simple. Below that, the outer front bumper grilles recall those of the outgoing Hellcat Challenger, while the main bumper grille is trapezoidal like the first facelifted modern Challenger from 2012. Also up front? The Fratzog logo from Mopar history. Gotta lean into that brand heritage, right?

2025 Dodge Charger 1

2025 Dodge Charger 2

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2025 Dodge Charger 3

Although it’s hard to tell much about the new Charger’s profile, it seems almost identical to that of the Charger SRT Daytona Banshee concept when viewed from afar, with a few minor detail changes. The mirrors are now actually large enough for a road car, while either a fuel door or a charging port appears on the left quarter panel. Dodge seems to have taken great pains to maintain the classic profile scalloping that reappeared on the previous Charger, and it seems to work on this new car.

2025 Dodge Charger 5

Based on information Stellantis has released previously, we know for sure that the new Charger will ride on the STLA Large architecture and feature some level of electrification, likely a full-on battery electric powertrain. However, leaks of bodyshells at a Stellantis facility earlier this year show a transmission tunnel, so don’t be surprised if the three-liter Hurricane inline-six from the Jeep Wagoneer makes an appearance.

Another thing we gleaned from those body-in-white photos is that the new Charger is likely a three-door liftback, making it the first three-door liftback Charger since 1987, and the first liftback Charger coupe with a longitudinal architecture ever. The once-popular liftback bodystyle is now sorely missed from the mass-market coupe segment, so this added boost of practicality might be just what people need to consider the new Dodge Charger a practical family car, even if it loses two doors over the last one.

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The Future Of Electrified Muscle: Dodge Charger Daytona Srt Conc

For a bit of context, here’s the Charger SRT Daytona Banshee concept from 2022. Notice the cutline of the front bumper, the distinct contouring where the fenders meet the hood and A-pillars, the bumper grille silhouette, and the rake of the A-pillars? Yep, all those things carry over from the concept, which suggests the concept may have been built using production data. Considering it’s a running, driving concept, using hardware already in development only makes sense from a cost perspective.

1968 Dodge Charger

While some might scoff at the Dodge Charger going electric, over the past 58 years, the nameplate’s been positively eclectic. The Charger started life as a midsized fastback for 1966 and 1967, before morphing into the muscle car canonized in the pantheon of greats by productions like “Bullitt” and “The Dukes of Hazzard.” This second-generation Charger was also where the Daytona nameplate was born, with a legendary wing car designed for NASCAR superspeedways.

1971 Dodge Charger

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For 1971, the styling shifted again, with a sleek nose, a more wedge-like silhouette, and Chrysler’s fuselage surfacing. These 1971 to 1974 Chargers are the last of the OG muscle car crop, with available V8 hero engines like the 426 Hemi, the 440, and the attainable 383. Of course, you could also get a third-generation Charger with more economy-minded engines like the 225-cube slant-six, but that’s part of classic American coupes’ long-lasting appeal — they offered something for everyone.

1977 Dodge Charger

In 1975, things got weird. The muscle car segment was dead thanks to rising fuel costs and concerns about emissions, to the Dodge Charger pivoted to being a rebranded Chrysler Cordoba. Look, it was the era of Quaaludes and leisure suits, it’s hard to explain but easy to acknowledge. Dodge eventually decided to use the Magnum name for its personal luxury coupe, putting the Charger nameplate on ice after 1978.

1982 Dodge Charger

That ice melted quickly. In 1981, the Charger was back and unlike any other Charger prior or since. This new car was front-wheel-drive, and started its life as an option package before taking over the Omni 024 range entirely. As with before, this Charger had range from mild to wild, with turbo Shelby power at the top of the range and a humble 1.6-liter Simca Poissy engine at the bottom. It was an unprecedently weird time for the Charger nameplate, but a fun one.

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Dodge Charger King Daytona

Oh, and who could forget the iconic LX and LD Chargers, spanning 2005 until 2023. These rear-wheel-drive bruisers were available with as little as 190 horsepower and as much as 807 horsepower, a hilarious spread if I’ve ever seen one. These cars singlehandedly rebuild the Charger’s reputation into what it is today, and David did a phenomenal job with his history of the LX platform if you’re interested in reading more.

Through the nameplate’s long and tumultuous life, the Dodge Charger has been a sporty midsize fastback, a muscle car, a personal luxury coupe, an import-fighting front-wheel-drive hatchback, a full-size sedan, and now likely an EV. How’s that for constant change?

2025 Dodge Charger 4

Expect the new Dodge Charger to debut later this year, possibly as either a 2025 model or a 2026 model depending on start-of-production. We wouldn’t be surprised if it offers a choice of electric or Hurricane turbocharged inline-six power, and it also seems reasonable to expect a liftback, given previous production leaks. Depending on where pricing clocks in, this could be one seriously tempting family vehicle if you don’t have much of a need for rear doors. Plus, even with its size, it could still give the Ford Mustang some competition.

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(Photo credits: Dodge)

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Captain Muppet
Captain Muppet
4 months ago

“Expect the new Dodge Charger to debut later this year, possibly as either a 2025 model or a 2026 model depending on start-of-production.”

If you start making a car in 2024 it’s a 2024 car, unless you’re in marketing, in which case I guess its one of two years, neither of which is the year it’s made.

Hey marketing people: if you’re so great at manipulating public opinion, how come we all think you’re dicks?

Rust Buckets
Rust Buckets
4 months ago
Reply to  Captain Muppet

Debut is different from start of production. Debut being the event where they unveil the styling(I guess not this time) and actually tell us the numbers and specs on this thing, what engines, ect.

They will start making it in 2025 as a 2025 model most likely.

Chewcudda
Chewcudda
4 months ago

I agree the styling is trying too hard to evoke the “day two” jacked up rear end look. If the base model offers a petrol V6 I would be interested.

Not The Ford 289
Not The Ford 289
4 months ago

That quarter panel to rear bumper transition is not good looking at all.

Manwich Sandwich
Manwich Sandwich
4 months ago

I hope they also come out with a 4 door version as well. If they don’t, it will further make Dodge an even lower volume and less viable brand.
If they aren’t gonna make a 4 door Charger, then bring back the 4 door version and call it the Coronet, Polara, Monaco or Magnum.

Not The Ford 289
Not The Ford 289
4 months ago

I like that idea

Grey alien in a beige sedan
Grey alien in a beige sedan
4 months ago

Neon XL

TXJeepGuy
TXJeepGuy
4 months ago

I feel like we’ll get a 4 door version, they’re just showing the coupe first.

Maxime Laplante
Maxime Laplante
4 months ago

They have the 4 door Charger and the 2 door Challenger on the same platform, why wouldn’t they just keep that recipe? And the Magnum if they want to offer a wagon. If both the electric and gas powered versions are named Daytona, then nothing makes sense.

Manwich Sandwich
Manwich Sandwich
4 months ago

 then nothing makes sense.”

You saying that go me thinking… what if they decided to make the Charger a 2 door coupe and call the 4 door the Challenger?

Or better yet… call the larger 4 door version the Dodge Colt Vista. And then have a wagon version and call it the SX 2.0 (which is the stupid name they gave to the Neon for a few years in the 2000s).

PL71 Enthusiast
PL71 Enthusiast
4 months ago

I think it looks fantastic. The rake is a little excessive but it definitely looks like a modern take on an old Charger.

Just missing the big ol buttresses. and 400+ cubes of V8.

One of the things that excites me about EVs is that aerodynamics require less ridiculous proportions. Hopefully we are witnessing the death of the massive “imposing” front end.

Rust Buckets
Rust Buckets
4 months ago

It looks like an old Charger, minus the coke bottle beltline, the one feature distinctive of all muscle cars.

Swing_Axle
Swing_Axle
4 months ago

Oh. It looks like a sad cat.

Ana Osato
Ana Osato
4 months ago

Yikes, that’s… what’s the opposite of easy on the eyes?

SoCoFoMoCo
SoCoFoMoCo
4 months ago

I think it looks great! And it appears you may be able to see out of it, which is a plus.

Chris D
Chris D
4 months ago
Reply to  SoCoFoMoCo

This is what the Camaro should have been, just about a foot longer.
GM has left a gap in the market that the Charger will very conveniently fill.

Anchor
Anchor
4 months ago
Reply to  Chris D

The problem with the Camaro is that it got too invested in ring lap times

Greensoul
Greensoul
4 months ago

btw, I don’t say God Dammit. When I’m pissed off I scream dirty whore. I’m told it’s better than using the “C” or “K” cuss words. They both sound the same, guess it comes down to how you spell sheet. Why, I don’t freaking, flipping , frucking know.

Greensoul
Greensoul
4 months ago

If my old arthritic hip can climb in and out without screaming “dirty whore, why are you trying to kill me”, I’m all in. To think back in the day, I could hop in and out of cars no problem. I hate my sisters Tesla’s, and my nephew’s Cayenne’s because of the enter/exit thing .You would think a Tesla would have a proper grab handle for old farts like me, but, nooooo. Tesla, Want me to like your car, put a fricken grab handle in them, you know, like a 18k Kia does?… Rant over

JCat
JCat
4 months ago

I’m really looking forward to the new Charger. But if worst comes to worst, prices are getting pretty darn reasonable on the old models… and those challys come with the Lord’s Transmission

Ppnw
Ppnw
4 months ago

This could have come out in 2010, there’s nothing to see here.

And the proportions of the rear (not pictured here but somewhere else on the internet) are all wrong.

Fe2 O3
Fe2 O3
4 months ago
Reply to  Ppnw

Interesting. From the picture here, it’s the rear end I like.. while the front end looks pinched and sad.

Drunken Master Paul
Drunken Master Paul
4 months ago

Ok, looks like TwiX is the best way to share the mockup of the taller grill.

Stock vs. DMP Dreamgrill

Last edited 4 months ago by Drunken Master Paul
ScottyB
ScottyB
4 months ago

Seems to be good to be true. Hopefully this isn’t just to crank up interest, only to pull out the rug with a sedan… or worse… for production.

Tristan Hixon
Tristan Hixon
4 months ago

The front… Well, it’s not a grille, but the lighting rectangle – needs to be about 50% taller. It feels squished.

Drunken Master Paul
Drunken Master Paul
4 months ago
Reply to  Tristan Hixon

totally agree. I posted this link in my earlier…um..post. I think you need to cut and paste into your browser, but I did a quick mockup of a taller “grill”. https://www.dropbox.com/scl/fi/8aofnk207gqi9n2sb3ism/Charger-large-grill.png?rlkey=o7lo25u01biq4j5k7bqnrqjw2&dl=0


Tristan Hixon
Tristan Hixon
4 months ago

Tried that. “This item was deleted.”

Drunken Master Paul
Drunken Master Paul
4 months ago
Reply to  Tristan Hixon

Yeah, Autopian doesn’t like Dropbox. Try this

Fe2 O3
Fe2 O3
4 months ago

Interesting. You’re definitely on to something but imo it still looks droopy and sad.

Tristan Hixon
Tristan Hixon
4 months ago
Reply to  Fe2 O3

Can only do so much about the droopiness when they’re also trying to make it more aerodynamic – big, bluff front ends aren’t exactly good for smooth airflow.

Tristan Hixon
Tristan Hixon
4 months ago

An improvement, to be sure. I can think of a few other improvements now that it’s less overwhelmingly squished: the light bar, rather than going all the way across, should have been formed into two rounded rectangles that end on either side of the central support. This would give it a little more of an homage to the first and second generation models while still looking cool and modern, and it would also help distract from the big hole in the middle.

BolognaBurrito
BolognaBurrito
4 months ago

Nah, prefer it the way they designed it.

Mariah Leight
Mariah Leight
4 months ago

This one is an EV variant. They told us a while ago shortly after they released the concept that the Fratzog was for the EV(s), so we know this much about this specific car.

It’s also all-but conformed from insiders that the majority will be Hurricane 6 powered, although we’ll see if they hybrid-ify that powerplant.

Honestly, as a former owner of a 2015, and had a roommate with a 2011… the tail looks weird. It’s almost awkwardly long for the car.

Paul Miller
Paul Miller
4 months ago

Not one comment about Charger being the perfect name for an EV?

Maxime Laplante
Maxime Laplante
4 months ago
Reply to  Paul Miller

Haha “Can I borrow your charger to charge my Charger?”

JDE
JDE
4 months ago

2025-26 car huh? Hope they have a few 2023 Chargers and Challengers on the lot to sell. That seems like a big gap to make to be honest.

Rust Buckets
Rust Buckets
4 months ago
Reply to  JDE

One model year gap seems excessively large? I guess you’ve never heard of a 1983 Corvette or a 1998 F350.

Ranwhenparked
Ranwhenparked
4 months ago
Reply to  Rust Buckets

Also, this is pretty normal with Chrysler or whatever they’re called this afternoon.

There was a 2 year gap between the last Dodge Viper and the launch of the SRT Viper that replaced it, also a 2-year gap between the 2nd and 3rd generations of the Dodge Durango, a 7 year gap between the Neon and the Dart, and a 1-year gap between the Jeep Liberty & Cherokee. They rarely seem to have their product plans organized enough for a smooth transition from one generation to another without an interregnum.

Fe2 O3
Fe2 O3
4 months ago
Reply to  Ranwhenparked

I just learned a new word, thank you

E Petry
E Petry
4 months ago
Reply to  Rust Buckets

Or the 1996 BMW 5 series

Ultradrive
Ultradrive
4 months ago
Reply to  E Petry

That was because of the transition to OBDII.

Eric Gonzalez
Eric Gonzalez
4 months ago
Reply to  E Petry

What? I own a 1996 BMW 5 Series

JDE
JDE
4 months ago
Reply to  E Petry

Thing is BMW had alternatives, Stellantis has nothing really except the Hornet maybe?

Thatmiataguy
Thatmiataguy
4 months ago
Reply to  Rust Buckets

Or a 1998 Miata

World24
World24
4 months ago

Looks at the titleLooks at an ’80s ChargerWhat asinine world do I live in where people actually rather admit a 2 door Omni is more of a Charger then a RWD, V8 powered sedan?

Last edited 4 months ago by World24
NosrednaNod
NosrednaNod
4 months ago

“… but this front clip just doesn’t look as expressively malevolent as the old Challenger …”

More world-weary… like a hired killer who wants to get out of the game, but can’t because their skills are still so in-demand….

Cheap Bastard
Cheap Bastard
4 months ago
Reply to  NosrednaNod

“… like a hired killer who wants to get out of the game, but can’t because their skills are still so in-demand….”

Happens more often than you’d think.

Rust Buckets
Rust Buckets
4 months ago

This styling is a huge disappointment. The last Challenger was a masterpiece, and this isn’t.

The distinctive features of the 08-23 Challenger that have it a strong resemblance to muscle cars of yore:
-Long wide hood with almost no slope.
-Fairly square roofline.
-A beltline that’s quite straight until it takes a large, obvious, angular kick up at the rear pillar, giving the coke bottle look.
-Iconic slotted grille, with round headlights in the grille.

This new one has:
-A hood with much more slope
-A much rounder roofline
-A beltline that brings up 2009 Eclipse more than any muscle car(look up a picture, it really looks like an eclipse)
-A much narrower grille slot with no round headlights
-A dorky looking lower bumper/splitter with some very non-muscle-car weird and unnecessary creases that make it look like a 2018 Lexus

So…. They took all the things that made the old Challenger great, and that brought up classic muscle cars, and reduced or eliminated all of those things. Was their design brief really “make it look like a muscle car, kinda, but without the coke bottle styling that is kind of the one hallmark of muscle car design, and generally worse than the last one”?

I’d love to see some Adrian Clarke input.

Unrelated: I’m betting that it comes with the 3.0 Hurricane, and a 2.0 turbo 4cyl version of the same motor. I expect a next generation Wrangler having these two engine options. If we’re lucky, they will finally phase out the Pentastar(good riddance!)

Last edited 4 months ago by Rust Buckets
Mark Jacob
Mark Jacob
4 months ago
Reply to  Rust Buckets

…..but this is the Charger, not the Challenger.

Rust Buckets
Rust Buckets
4 months ago
Reply to  Mark Jacob

This is replacing both the four door charger and two door challenger. Since it’s two door, I consider it to be the successor to the challenger, not the charger. They called it a Charger, not a Challenger because electric cars charge and it’s electric(sometimes anyways).

Styling wise, it shares absolutely nothing with the four door charger.

JDE
JDE
4 months ago
Reply to  Rust Buckets

The Charger should never have been a 4 door anyway. they had a kind of unique way to hide the extra doors in the form of clamshells in the early 2000ish showcar, but even then that should have been a Coronet and a 2 door version could have been the proper charger. Or better yet they could have used Coronet and GTX

Ecsta C3PO
Ecsta C3PO
4 months ago
Reply to  JDE

Counterpoint – it being called the charger was a significant reason it did so well for an otherwise OK sedan

Ranwhenparked
Ranwhenparked
4 months ago
Reply to  Ecsta C3PO

Yeah, and they had the Challenger name available for a coupe – in this day and age, there isn’t enough demand for coupes to have multiple models in different segments, its one or none, and DaimlerChrysler obviously felt like Charger was more iconic than any historical sedan names (although, I’d argue Polara would have been fine)

JDE
JDE
4 months ago
Reply to  Ranwhenparked

Polara should be the name of the first Dodge EV I would think.

PaysOutAllNight
PaysOutAllNight
4 months ago
Reply to  Rust Buckets

I was about to agree with your comment, until you said “good riddance” about the Pentastar.

Chrysler is making a big mistake unless the Hurricane is truly epic.

Search an auto sale site for 8-12 year old cars. Sort by mileage, high to low. Then look at what powers all those “highly experienced” vehicles. At the top of the list you’ll find an unexpectedly huge number of cars, SUVs, vans, and trucks powered by the Chrysler Pentastar engine.

I’ve had two Pentastar engines (still have one of them) and they’ve been efficient and powerful, quiet and smooth, and literally nothing has gone wrong with either of them. Not even an O2 sensor. And neither has burned enough oil between changes to even notice, even while using watery 5w-20.

The only V6s that I think are better are made by Toyota. I’ll miss it when it’s gone. The Pentastar is definitely among the world’s greatest engines.

Rust Buckets
Rust Buckets
4 months ago

There is a very good chance the Hurricane will be superior to the Pentastar. Almost every straight six made in the last 30 years is legendary. Jeep 4.0, Atlas/Vortec 4200, Ford 300, Nissan RB, Toyota 2JZ, and of course every Cummins.

The main reason I don’t like the Pentastar is because it’s the reason we’ve had 18(!) years of lame v6 powered not torquey jeeps. And what I’ve heard from mechanics is that Pentastar aren’t total junk, but that they are especially prone to lifter and VVT issues.

Geoff Buchholz
Geoff Buchholz
4 months ago
Reply to  Rust Buckets

I would also like to see our goth uncle provide his perspective … and fwiw, I also saw a hint of Eclipse in the rear three-quarter view.

Rust Buckets
Rust Buckets
4 months ago
Reply to  Geoff Buchholz

I was looking specifically at how the beltline dips down a LOT right behind the front wheel and then follows a gradual slope along the door to the back, which is what those last generation eclipses did. This being very different from the Challenger beltline that’s straight as an arrow from the headlight to the rear pillar.

MikeInTheWoods
MikeInTheWoods
4 months ago

Put me down for $20 that they deliver it to dealers with blue corner protectors for the front splitter. Because yellow is so 2022 and it’s electric, so blue or green will be trendy.

Automotiveflux
Automotiveflux
4 months ago

Waiting for the Pentastar version

Canopysaurus
Canopysaurus
4 months ago

I’ll have to see one on the street before deciding whether I like it or not, but right off the top, this is much more of a Charlenger than a Charger. Based on the limited pictures, it still looks like the best version of the Charger since the model flew the coupe.

Jack Trade
Jack Trade
4 months ago
Reply to  Canopysaurus

This is exactly what I was thinking – Dodge is economizing on “sedan” models so figures it’ll split the difference between two separate products.

MikuhlBrian
MikuhlBrian
4 months ago

This is definitely the electric version Charger Daytona and not the regular ICE Charger.

  • “Fratzog” logo in the middle of the front end. Dodge has said that the Fratzog logo would be exclusive to EVs going forward.
  • “R-wing”- If you look closely, you can see the “R-wing” front end instead of a traditional grille. The “R-wing” element is the open grille that leads into a much more sloping hood for aerodynamics. The ICE versions will get a traditional grill.
  • Not shown- I saw another image released (but not part of this set) taht shows the back of one of the cars. No exhaust, and embossed in the rear diffuser is the word “Daytona”
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