Home » The One And Only Production Rotary Pickup Truck Kinda Sucks But You’ll Still Want It Anyway

The One And Only Production Rotary Pickup Truck Kinda Sucks But You’ll Still Want It Anyway

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Mazda used to be obsessed with the rotary engine, and I mean way more than it is today. There was a time when Mazda was so addicted to Wankel power that it shoved the spinning Dorito engine into anything it could get its hands on. The result was sports cars, family cars, and even a bus. Then there’s this, the one and only production rotary pickup truck in the world. The Mazda Rotary Pickup (or REPU, for Rotary Engined Pick Up) sort of sucks as a pickup truck, but you won’t care because you’ll want one in your driveway, anyway.

Pickup truck history is chock-full of wonderful attempts of being different. General Motors once fitted trucks with composite truck beds that couldn’t rust and don’t forget the weird Ford Midbox. The whole existence of the Chevrolet Avalanche and its beefy big block version is another pickup truck anomaly.

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It’s not just recent history, either. Studebaker used to be a champion of the car-based pickup truck and Chevrolet even built some awesome trucks and vans out of the Corvair. Don’t forget about the Ford Durango or the Dodge Rampage, either. If you want something a bit different but still with a bed, there’s lots of truck history to love out there. Mazda’s mark on truck history is that of an automaker that built small, yet dependable workhorses. That is with one major exception. In the 1970s, right before diesel started taking off as a way to increase fuel economy, Mazda was in the middle of Wankel fever.

Mazda admits it went a bit crazy with rotaries in the 1970s, stating “Almost everything Mazda sold in North America featured the engine.” This was hilariously true. If you were an American car buyer in the 1970s, you could get the RX-2 economy car, the RX-3 micro pony car, the RX-4 family car, and the RX-7 all with Wankel power. And what Mazda rotary history would be complete without the historic Cosmo and the bonkers Mazda Parkway Rotary 26 transit bus? Mazda says that in 1972, it sold about 100,000 vehicles powered by a rotary engine in America. Mazda’s rotaries were so popular that by the time the 1970s were out, about half of every Mazda built had a rotary.

Repu Brochure 1

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So, you’re an automaker obsessed with the work of Felix Wankel and have placed the engine in just about anything that moves. Where do you go next? A pickup truck, of course!

The Original Mazdas

Mazda says its automotive history is rooted in trucks. While the original firm was known for its cork manufacturing, today’s Mazda calls iself one of Japan’s earliest automakers. And it did it on the backs of three-wheeled trucks, from Mazda:

Mazda’s history as an automaker began in 1931 with the unveiling of a three-wheeled truck known as the Mazda-Go Type-DA. The company was aiming for class-leading performance and maximum loading capacity, domestic production of various parts including the engine, and the setting up of a consistent volume production system. The engine was built in-house and had a transmission with a reverse gear, a rear differential and other components patented by Mazda(then Toyo Kogyo). The introduction of the Mazda-Go was a pivotal moment in the history of Japan’s three-wheeled truck market.

Japan’s automotive history began with Mitsubishi Shipbuilding, Ltd. (currently Mitsubishi Motors) which commenced production of its Mitsubishi A Type passenger car in 1917. Nissan, in its previous form was established as an automaker in 1933, Toyoda Automatic Loom Works, Ltd. (currently Toyota) completed its A1 Type passenger car in 1935, and Honda was established later in 1946. In this historical context, Mazda was an early starter in automobile manufacturing compared with other Japanese companies.

Mazda Turns 100

The name Mazda came into existence with the production of the Company’s first three-wheeled trucks. Other candidates for a model name included Sumera-Go, Tenshi-Go and more. But these were swept aside when it was decided to name it in honor of the family name of then company president, Jujiro Matsuda. The name was also associated with Ahura Mazda (God of Light), with the hope that it would brighten the image of these compact vehicles. The Mazda lettering was used in combination with the corporate emblem of Mitsubishi, which was responsible for sales, to produce the Toyo Kogyo three-wheeled truck registered trademark.

Mazda says those three-wheeled trucks became a part of the backbone of the Japanese workforce. After World War II, those same three-wheeled trucks helped the nation get back on its feet. According to Mazda, three-wheeled trucks were so popular in Japan that by 1953, 72 percent of the trucks built in the nation had just three wheels.

Pictures Mazda Type Ca Four Whee

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However, as Japan’s economy spiked, truck buyers in the nation began to seek out more comfortable trucks with four wheels. Mazda had already been producing handfuls of four-wheeled trucks since 1950 (above), but the firm decided to pounce on the growing market. At the same time, something else was happening, from my previous retrospective:

In 1955, Japan’s Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI) was on a mission to get the nation’s people on wheels. It started with the concept of a people’s car. Then, MITI realized that Japan’s post-World War II industries weren’t competitive on the global stage. MITI developed a plan to put Japan’s industries, especially the automotive industry, on the same level as the titans from America and Europe. In an effort to achieve this, MITI sought to condense Japan’s automotive industry. The logic was that fewer but larger automotive firms would be more competitive as opposed to a bunch of small companies trying to make it. Thus, smaller firms, including Toyo Kogyo, Mazda’s former name, were under the threat of being merged. Only the companies that offered something exceptional would be more likely to remain independent.

Mazda wanted to remain independent, but how would it do that? To prevent a forced merger, Mazda decided to do something none of the other Japanese automakers were doing by launching a moonshot engine experiment. Mazda would scoop up a license for Felix Wankel’s rotary engine, fix its critical reliability issues, and fit it into production vehicles.

Photos Mazda Romper 1958 1

As Mazda was working on securing its future, it was also working on getting Japanese workers in capable trucks. The Romper cabover truck was launched in 1958 and the D1100 followed the next year. These were capable trucks for their day. A Romper carried a metric tonne and was motivated by a twin-cylinder engine making 32.5 HP. The D1100 also carried a tonne, but ran with an advanced water-cooled four-cylinder engine good for 46 HP. Later came the 1.75 tonne D1500 with made 60 HP. Mazda says the D1100 was the most powerful truck in its class. That gives you a bit a glimpse into what Japanese trucks were like in 1959.

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These truck successes were great for Mazda as it rose from just 4 percent of the Japanese truck market to 10 percent in just a single year. Japanese buyers lined up for these trucks and Mazda didn’t let off the gas, producing better and more powerful iterations. Eventually, Mazda realized it needed to cater to the light duty market, too, and in 1961 it produced the first of its B series, the B1500.

B1500

Today’s truck is based on its second generation, the Mazda Proceed of 1965. This truck was also sold as the B1500 and made it to America as the B1600 in 1972. Americans might know this B series better as the Ford Courier, which sold far better than the Mazda-badged unit.

The B1600 and the Courier reached America in response to the popularity of small pickups from Toyota and Datsun. To say the Mazda truck packed a punch would be an understatement. Sure, the engine under the hood was a small 1.6-liter four. And sure, that engine made just 64 HP and 78 lb-ft of torque. However, Mazda said these trucks could carry 1,200 pounds in its 6.16-foot bed. Hagerty claims that later on, the B1600 would be advertised with a chunky 2,250 pounds of payload.

Mazda Proceed 1965 Images 1

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The Ford Courier was a Mazda B series with a more American look and a 1.8-liter with 74 HP and 92 lb-ft of torque. For later Couriers, Ford would rob the Pinto of its 2.3-liter 90 HP four. Ford’s model also carried a nice 1,400-pound payload. As Hagerty writes, the Japanese truck manufacturers figured out a clever way to dodge the infamous Chicken Tax. The trucks would arrive as chassis cabs without beds, which meant they were subject to just a 4 percent tariff. The trucks would then get their beds fitted once the feds were no longer looking.

Rotary Power

Something fascinating is that Mazda did not market its B1600 in America as a compact, fuel-efficient pickup truck. Instead, Mazda went the route of pitching the B1600 as the pickup truck for the car enthusiast. In advertising for the 1972 model, Mazda boasts how one magazine said the B1600 felt more like a sports car than any other mini truck on sale in America at the time.

S L1600 (84)
Mazda via eBay

Mazda leaned into this, clipping words from magazine articles that described the 1.6-liter four as “perky.” The suspension also wasn’t described in the context of being a truck, either. Instead, Mazda said the heavy duty front coil spring suspension and 6-leaf packs in the rear were good for winding country roads. Sure, Mazda said you could carry 1,200 pounds in the bed, but it really wanted you to know that the B1600 had a four on the floor for fun.

According to Mazda, this led to one more development. It was Mazda’s opinion that American pickup trucks were crude and basic. Mazda wanted to prove that it didn’t have to be this way. How? It would bring sports car technology to the worker’s pickup truck by lowering 1.3-liter 13B Wankel from the RX-4 into the engine bay. This was the birth of the Rotary Engined Pick Up (REPU), also known as the Mazda Rotary Pickup, the sports car of pickup trucks.

West Coast Classic 1

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Mazda did more than just give the Rotary Pickup a Wankel engine and a supposedly good suspension. To enhance that sports car feel, you were able to get your truck with a dash with fake wood accents, full carpet on the floor, and a luxurious tachometer. Road & Track notes that the REPU also got a 6-inch wider rear track and a 5-inch wider front track, plus flares to cover the bigger tires. You got all of that for $3,500, or $26,745 today.

The engine wasn’t a slouch, either. The twin-rotor 13B was good for 110 HP and 117 lb-ft of torque, which was pretty good for its day. The REPU also scored well in reviews. Take this from Road & Track:

West Coast Classic 2 D
The battery is under that hatch!

Being thoroughly familiar with Mazda rotary engines—and generally well impressed with them—we were naturally curious as to how one would work in the pickup. The RX-4 unit, largest of the lot, works outstandingly well. It’s not as quiet in this vehicle as it is in the super-refined RX-4; a larger cooling fan sets up quite a howl even though it’s on a viscous-drive coupling. But the engine is reasonably quiet and, as usual, butter-smooth as it pulls strongly up through the gears or merely accelerates impressively in top gear. As with the passenger cars there’s a warning buzzer to keep you from overdoing it, coming on at something over 6000 rpm. We used 7000 rpm as a limit and found the pickup capable of 0-60 mph in 11 sec flat and the quarter-mile in 18.3: not as quick as the fastest American pickup, but peppy indeed.

Everyone who pays attention to such things has chuckled at bouncing people in little Japanese pickups, and the regular Mazda pickup with piston engine has been little different from the Datsun and Toyota in this regard. But we found the Rotary to ride relatively well for its type. Actually, the front end seems a little on the soft side, floating and oscillating on gentle bumps. The rear end is stiff, as you’d expect of a light mass sprung for 1400 lb more weight than it usually carries, and of course the ride improves markedly when you start adding cargo back there. One thing in particular struck us, though. Most of the passenger cars we drive these days have radial tires and our experience with bias tires is receding into the past. All the little pickups come with bias rubber, and the Rotary with what are actually rather large bias tires goes across those annoying lane-divider dots without a trace of harshness or rumble. Or rattles, for that matter; this pickup had fewer rattles and squeaks than any in our memory.

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One doesn’t think of driving a pickup like a sports car. but we found the Rotary’s steering more precise than that of other little pickups and its handling response good enough to make brisk driving enjoyable. In the unloaded condition it understeers fairly strongly (surprisingly it isn’t very noseheavy) and begins to pick up its inside rear wheel as the cornering limit is reached. Naturally it’s not going to take to hard cornering on a bumpy road, but on a smooth one it has curve capability to equal some of the less expensive small sports sedans.

1977 Mazda Rotary Pickup 1608267
Bring A Trailer Seller
1977 Mazda Rotary Pickup 1610086
Bring A Trailer Seller

The people of Truck Trend had an even better time, somehow getting the REPU to 60 mph in 8.9 seconds. That wouldn’t be such a bad 60 mph sprint today, let alone in 1974.

Unfortunately, I’m pretty sure you can see the development of a problem, here. The Mazda Rotary Pickup’s engine, like many rotaries, has to be wrung out to really see that power. In other words, you have to drive it like a sports car rather than a truck, which comes at odds with a truck’s mission. Truck buyers want stump-pulling power down low, not near the top of the rev range.

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Calitruck

Other issues came from the fact that the rotary returned 16.5 mpg in mixed driving testing and while a rotary has fewer moving parts than a piston engine, it was a novel engine with more complicated repairs. Other bad news came from poor timing on Mazda’s part. The REPU was sold only in North America, not even in Japan. Unfortunately, the American economy was struggling in the wake of an oil crisis, and a relatively thirsty sport truck wasn’t exactly what people were looking for.

Combine it all together and you have a quick small truck that isn’t that good at being a small truck. Perhaps that’s why Mazda sold about 15,000 of them between 1974 and 1977. Still, when you read retrospectives you’ll find REPU drivers talking about how the smooth and relatively quiet mini pickup felt like a rocket when you got that rotary singing.

Repu Brochure 3

The Mazda Rotary Pickup is also a piece of history. Mazda says it’s the first and the only production pickup truck with a rotary engine. Whether that’s good news or not is up to you. However, the REPU has plenty of fans willing to buy up a used truck if you don’t. It looks like you can get a REPU that runs well but isn’t cosmetically perfect for around $17,000. Rough ones get much cheaper and pristine ones get more expensive. I found just a few for sale currently.

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This is another truck we’re unlikely to see ever again. This time it isn’t even because of the switch to EVs. Mazda discovered that a rotary pickup didn’t really work and never tried it again. But if you’re looking for a piece of rotary history that isn’t an RX-7, I doubt you could go wrong with a Mazda Rotary Pickup. You can even use it to bring home your Suzuki RE-5.

(Images: Mazda, unless otherwise noted.)

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Vetatur Fumare
Vetatur Fumare
24 days ago

I saw one of these in Colorado in ~1996 and literally didn’t believe my eyes; being pre-internet days I couldn’t confirm that this was a real, actual product sold by Mazda.

Ihor Huk
Ihor Huk
24 days ago

Pretty cool article. The green Repu at the car show with the trucks in the background is actually my personal truck.

Joshua Christian
Joshua Christian
17 days ago
Reply to  Ihor Huk

Really cool!

Jnnythndrs
Jnnythndrs
24 days ago

I drove a REPU from ’85 to around ’92 and it was a great truck, all things considered, The wide track and front discs made a huge difference in the handling/braking compared to the other mini-pickups of the time and “lack of low-end torque” is more of a myth than reality – they came with a 4.62 rear gear and a fairly low First in the transmission, so off-the-line performance, even with a load, was fine.

Fuel mileage wasn’t great with the four-speed that most of them came with, but I swapped a five-speed into mine and it would get around 20-21mpg on the freeway, which wasn’t a hell of a lot less than the Hilux and 720 trucks. It was hard to keep your foot out of it though, the smoothness and eagerness to rev is addicting.

The ’74-up NA 12A and 13B rotaries were quite reliable compared to the earlier ’70-’73 version, as the apex seals were changed from carbon to sintered iron and the two-distributor system was eliminated. The one Achilles heel in all rotaries is that you can’t overheat them, even once, or the aluminum housings expand more than the steel bolts that hold them together and they leak water into the combustion chamber. And cooling systems were much less reliable in 1974.

Mine, unfortunately, was beat up pretty bad when I got it and I was never able to find a clean one, by the time I was making decent money, they were outrageously priced and impossible to find, I looked for a long time.

WR250R
WR250R
24 days ago

Holy butts would I love to see one of those early three-wheeled truck bikes in person!

EVDesigner
EVDesigner
25 days ago

I was commuting home one day and saw a REPU next to me in traffic. I assume the owner might have modified or even engine swapped it with a FD 13B or something because it sounded amazing. Although I did feel bad for whoever was stuck in it during a heat wave during the summer in rush hour traffic

Barry Allen
Barry Allen
25 days ago

“Rotary Powered (insert anything here) kinda sucks, but you’ll still want it anyway”
Just being honest here. I think I’d be excited about a wankel weed whacker.

MrLM002
MrLM002
25 days ago
Reply to  Barry Allen

I would too, though mainly because I’d take the engine out of the weed whacker and build a moped or minibike out of it.

Gilbert Wham
Gilbert Wham
25 days ago
Reply to  MrLM002

My high school had a wankel-powered hovercraft that the shop class would tinker with.

Ranwhenparked
Ranwhenparked
25 days ago
Reply to  Gilbert Wham

Was that similar to those hovercraft plans they sold in the back of Boys Life that nobody ever actually built?

Turbotictac
Turbotictac
24 days ago
Reply to  Barry Allen

I watched a Youtube video of Junkyard Digs working on a rotary snowmobile and it sounded remarkably good. A lot of the comments were about how it had the classic rotary sound at idle.

Rommi
Rommi
25 days ago

I saw one of these a couple weeks ago in San Antonio. It sounded amazing

Jim Zavist
Jim Zavist
25 days ago

Another unique aspect is the remote battery location, behind the cab, under the right side of the bed, with its own access flap.

Last edited 25 days ago by Jim Zavist
Gary Lynch
Gary Lynch
25 days ago

My dad bought a RX4 in ‘74, unfortunately right before Mazda launched a massive rebate program (to counteract the poor gas mileage in the first EPA gas mileage ratings). I lusted over the rotary truck at the time; it was soooo much nicer than the gas version. As time went on, unfortunately the rotary truck rusted as quickly as it ran.

CSRoad
CSRoad
26 days ago

The RX2 was not an economy car more a mid-size Japanese or European car.
They were pretty impressive in the context of the time. The RX2 was often reviewed as an affordable sport sedan at that point, think Datsun PL510 or BMW 1600/2002 for reference.

Hamish48
Hamish48
24 days ago
Reply to  CSRoad

I had its little brother, the RX3 “pony car”. It was a total blast and blew off some surprising cars quite regularly

Steve P
Steve P
26 days ago

Love the tailgate: ROTARY POWER

Jalop Gold
Jalop Gold
25 days ago
Reply to  Steve P

Again, perfect for the rotary club parking lot!

James Carson
James Carson
26 days ago

I didn’t know these existed. I did a boatload of rust repair on a mid 70’s B in the early 80’s. Fixed the bed and cab rust through and painted it in the original mustard/baby poo yellow. Nice little truck as I recall. Immediately after the Mazda I did a bunch of customization on a jacked up SR5 4×4. The SR5 was fairly new and got metal flares, custom paint and some striping. We slapped on some aftermarket tubular bumpers and a brush guard. Another cool little truck.

Andy Individual
Andy Individual
26 days ago

The short life span of the rotary was generally offset by how fast these rusted into the ground, so I would consider it a non-issue.

Canopysaurus
Canopysaurus
26 days ago

The life of a REPU man is always intense.

Widgetsltd
Widgetsltd
25 days ago
Reply to  Canopysaurus

Let’s get a drink!

Jonathan Hendry
Jonathan Hendry
26 days ago

Everyone who pays attention to such things has chuckled at bouncing people in little Japanese pickups”

What does this refer to?

Mantis Toboggan, MD
Mantis Toboggan, MD
26 days ago

Evidently other Japanese pickups of the time were sprung very hard as the writer then contrasts them with the smoothness of the Mazda.

Rapgomi
Rapgomi
26 days ago

I love love love the Romper cabover truck! Even the name is great 🙂

In the early 2000s I had a friend who had a REPU with a mid mounted heavily modified twin turbo 13B. It had a custom built frame, a transaxle and independent rear suspension. I have no idea how much power it put out but it was nearly undriveable. The engine was super loud and high pitched, and the powerband very narrow but crazy strong: nothing, nothing, nothing… then the tires turned to smoke, it leaped in the air, and you made the jump to hyperspace!

Eggsalad
Eggsalad
26 days ago

Great article, but IMO this is one of the dumbest ideas in automotive history. Absolutely the most incorrect engine for a pickup truck. Poor low-end torque, poor fuel economy (fewer MPG than an I-6 half-ton domestic), short service life, and I could go on.

Maybe, just maybe, if they had created a more El Camino-esque body, it would have sold as “the sports car that hauls”. But this? Nah, just give me a Courier.

Joe L
Joe L
26 days ago
Reply to  Eggsalad

Mazda had no piston engines large than 4 cylinders at this point. When this was being designed and prepared for production, the OPEC crisis hadn’t happened and Mazda was planning to move wholesale to the rotary. Of course we know how that turned out. But this was actually sensible given when it was conceived, and frankly it had far more power and relatively comparable torque compared with the other Japanese trucks available at the time.

Rust Buckets
Rust Buckets
25 days ago
Reply to  Eggsalad

I don’t know how poor the low end torque really is. There’s a guy on Instagram who has rotary swapped a flat fender jeep, and it idles over rocks exactly as well as a Go-Devil jeep does(so quite well).

And contemporary Japanese compact pickups didn’t exactly have the “stump-pulling torque” you’re talking about, nor were they expected to pull anything remotely heavy.

Scoutdude
Scoutdude
26 days ago

I guess you had to have been there. They didn’t kind of suck, well at least no more than the other early mini trucks did. Yeah the rotary doesn’t have a lot of bottom end torque but it isn’t like the other trucks were serious stump pullers.

I had friends with a REPU and Courier and a LUV and I drove them all when they weren’t that old. The piston poppers might have won on the roll out but you had them before you shifted out of first if you let it spin like it wants to. We used the REPU to tow home a project car or two and one of them was over 100 mi and I wouldn’t have wanted to use the Courier or LUV for the same duty.

The wider track and suspension tuning made them a better driver than the Courier and the Rotary made it much more fun to drive.

Yes the MPG was not as good as the others but they weren’t exactly getting that great of MPG and it was still way better than the full size trucks of the time.

Rust Buckets
Rust Buckets
25 days ago
Reply to  Scoutdude

16.5mpg is not way better than fullsize pickups of the time, that is very achievable with 6cyl half tons even from the 70s. Ford used to advertise 25mpg from certain f150s. That was just a lie, but high teens are normal.

Small pickups, over their entire history, have delivered disappointing fuel economy compared to fullsize pickups, and they still do.

Ranwhenparked
Ranwhenparked
25 days ago
Reply to  Rust Buckets

Well, except for kei pickups, those actually get pretty decent fuel economy. But are also getting to be illegal here

Scoutdude
Scoutdude
24 days ago
Reply to  Rust Buckets

The average pickup from the early 70’s did not have a 6cyl and were lucky to get 12mpg. The F-100s that scored a 25 MPG HWY number didn’t come around until the early 80’s and of course they didn’t achieve that in the real world.

PresterJohn
PresterJohn
26 days ago

Fantastic article on this truck! Anything rotary is an instant click for me. Owning a rotary engined car is on my bucket list and I’m holding out hope Mazda will put a new one into production

Mantis Toboggan, MD
Mantis Toboggan, MD
26 days ago
Reply to  PresterJohn

Unless someone designs a rotary that doesn’t burn oil there aren’t any that can pass emissions standards. Besides EVs being the next big thing environmental regulations would keep any rotary from being put into a production vehicle. There’s a company called LiquidPiston who make an “inside-out” rotary with a peanut shaped rotor and a triangular housing, which is opposite of the usual design. They’ve reported a lot of success dealing with reliability and efficiency issues but they’ve still only got their engines approved for military use where emissions regulations don’t apply.

PresterJohn
PresterJohn
25 days ago

I’m assuming the rotary range extender that Mazda currently produces and sells in Europe passes emissions there so it can’t be too bad. I’m guessing it’d be a part of a PHEV setup but I’d like it if it could drive the wheels directly.

Rust Buckets
Rust Buckets
25 days ago

Or if it completely burns its oil. That’s kind of what Mazda attempted back in the day with the exhaust reactor that was attached to some rotaries.

Rotaries are also limited on compression ratio and have a very terrible combustion chamber shape, and I think that’s what’s more limiting on the emissions front.

RM
RM
26 days ago

Love this article! Well, as a long time fan of Mazda, just about any Mazda article works for me 🙂 In my teens I owned a really rusty beat up 1978 Courier and a really rusty beat up 1979 RX7… both of which began my lifelong home wrenching habit BTW. I loved that rotary, and always joked about putting one in the Courier. About a decade later read about the very truck you had written about, and thought AHA, all I need is a huge chunk of disposable cash, and the rotary truck can be in my stable! Well, two MPVs, two 3’s and a CX9 later and I still haven’t landed one 🙂

Squirrelmaster
Squirrelmaster
26 days ago

A guy in the small town I grew up in had one of these, back when they were relatively new. I always thought it looked really cool, and since my dad once owned an RX3 and my uncle had an RX4, the idea of a rotary truck was a cool idea in my head. I’ve kept my eyes out for one over the years, though if I’m honest I’m not sure what I would do with one if I had the chance to get it.

Cerberus
Cerberus
26 days ago

Some of those earlier trucks were pretty good looking. That Romper is surprisingly cool and I really like that B1500. Today, the REPU would be a neat oddity (for someone else), but I’m surprised they even sold as many as they did back in their day.

Motorhead Mike
Motorhead Mike
26 days ago
Reply to  Cerberus

That was my thought exactly. The body line on the B1500 is fantastic, and the Romper, well, it looks kind of like a UNIMOG, but with better proportions. At least the front end looks better. Crap, I think I want a B1500 now. Thanks Mercedes.

Christo Arvanitis
Christo Arvanitis
26 days ago

As usual, a well researched and wonderfully written article Mercedes. So many of your articles are like a dissertation, and I mean that in a good way.

I’ve wondered if you have a background in research or library sciences or something adjacent. Or you’re just a damned good journalist. You put in the research. Kudos.

As a happy owner of many Mazdas over the years, I enjoyed learning a bit more about them. Currently have a 10 year old, Japan made, bulletproof CX-5.. but had an OG ’80 RX-7 that I bought new just out of college that was an absolute blast.

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