Home » Two Decades Ago, You Could Buy A Heavy Duty Chevy Silverado 1500 With A Big V8 And Four-Wheel-Steering: Holy Grails

Two Decades Ago, You Could Buy A Heavy Duty Chevy Silverado 1500 With A Big V8 And Four-Wheel-Steering: Holy Grails

Silverado 1500 Holy Grail Ts
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There’s a segment of truck buyers out there who want their pickups to be better than a half-ton, but they don’t want a real heavy-duty truck. The “heavy half” technically serves this demographic and in the early 2000s, GM created a special truck with features you initially couldn’t find in a regular half-ton. The Chevrolet Silverado 1500HD offered buyers four doors, a burly 6.0-liter V8 engine, higher hauling capacity, and the option of four-wheel-steering through Quadrasteer. GM doesn’t sell a heavy half anymore so the 1500HD remains beloved by many.

The concept of the heavy half-ton truck is a fascinating thing. The idea of adding ever so slightly more to the capacity of a half-ton truck traces back to the 1970s. Beginning in 1975 and lasting a handful of years, GM sold its Chevrolet C10 and its GMC C15 in versions that were slightly more capable than the base truck. The upgraded C10 was dubbed the Big 10 while the C15 earned the moniker Heavy Half. In the past, the “ton” classification used to be a bit more literal. A half-ton pickup truck carried just that, about 1,000 pounds. A three-quarter-ton got you to 1,500 pounds and eventually, 1-ton trucks started showing up with around 2,000 pound capacities.

Vidframe Min Top
Vidframe Min Bottom

The heavy half trucks were similar to their base colleagues but had their gross vehicle weights kicked slightly higher to just over 6,000 pounds. The exact reasoning seems to be lost to time, but an often-repeated theory has to do with the fact that per government regulations, trucks with gross weights heavier than 6,000 pounds had a better time dodging tightening emissions. As Jason Torchinsky wrote in 2018, this sort of loophole is part of why the fastest American car of 1977 wasn’t a car at all, but the Dodge Li’l Red Express truck.

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These heavy half trucks were nominally half-ton trucks, but they had greater carrying capacities. In the case of the GM trucks, GVW was increased from 5,600 to 6,200 pounds with upgraded springs and tires. Ford introduced the F-150 during this era as a heavier version of the F-100. Ford also had a light and heavy version of its F-250 in the 1980s.

Heavy halfs show up a number of times in modern truck history, too. Ford got cute and badged the heavy half version of the F-150 as the F-250, which was wild because Ford also sold an actual F-250 at the time, too. Over at Dodge, the Ram 1500 was sold in a heavy half version in the mid-2000s. Of course, Nissan also tried the heavy half idea recently with the Titan XD, which ended up being a failure. Some in the audience may argue that the heavy half never left, as you can option a modern half-ton to have more capacity for hauling or towing.

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2002 Gmc Sierra 1500hd Img 6545
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That truck wasn’t trying to dodge regulations but was targeted at an apparently small market of truck buyers who wanted more than a half-ton, but weren’t willing to go all of the way to a three-quarter-ton. GM catered to this market in the early 2000s with the Chevrolet Silverado 1500HD and GMC Sierra 1500HD, rare half-tons built for more and, at first, the only way to get a new four-door full-size from GM without stepping up to a heavy-duty-badged truck.

Following Up Perfection

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If you’ve followed our site for long enough, you know we’re big fans of the GMT400 platform. It’s a truck design that seems so simple, yet it has attained GM truck legend status all of these years later. Of course, that means the folks at General Motors had big shoes to fill when designing its successor.

As WardsAuto wrote in 1998, General Motors started development of the GMT800 in 1993. This new truck had a lot riding on it. GM, which once sold America’s favorite trucks, slipped a couple of rungs down the ladder. It couldn’t match the might of Ford or the style of the hit second-generation Dodge Ram. GM’s truck market share went from 51 percent down to 37 percent before a slight rebound to 40 percent. Even worse, tossing GMC Sierra sales into the pile still meant that Ford demolished GM in truck sales.

Photos Chevrolet Silverado 1

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Now it was time to catch up to and pass its rivals. WardsAuto explains that there was a lot of money involved in the development of the new truck. GM was set to spend $6 billion by 2000 on the new truck and its success in the market would determine executive bonuses, employee profit sharing, revenue from advertising, and of course, GM’s share of the truck market.

GM’s own research, which was conducted before the second-generation Ram changed truck expectations, suggested that truck buyers didn’t care as much about technology as they did power and size. Before GMT800 development kicked off in earnest, engineers created five pickup truck mockups out of wood and styrofoam, then placed a windshield and seats in them. Two of the test bucks were smaller than the then-current C/K, one was the same size as the C/K, and two were larger. Reportedly, engineers were shocked to learn that existing GM truck owners thought the C/K-sized buck was too small, forget about the smaller ones. Later tests revealed that customers wanted big power.

Chevy 1500hd 11

My retrospective continues:

The successor to the legendary GMT400, the GMT800, which launched in 1999 added some notable improvements. One headlining change was a three-piece frame as opposed to a single-piece frame. Having the frame in sections allowed GM to mix frame parts to match specific configurations for truck GVWR, wheelbase, and body. The front section of the frame was hydroformed, while the middle and rear sections were roll-formed or stamped depending on the vehicle. Bolted to the GMT800 frame was an independent suspension up front and leaf packs in the rear.

The excellent frame was only part of the equation, as GM fitted these frames with modern truck and SUV bodies as well as a variety of powertrain options ranging from gas engines and diesel to a CNG engine and a hybrid. Some people believe the GMT800 was and remains one of the greatest truck platforms of all time for its honest reliability, affordable parts, user-friendly repairs, and longevity.

Part of that reputation has to do with how GM streamlined production of GMT800 trucks. Magna International was in charge of building the GMT800’s frames and engineers achieved an average part count of 200, down 10 percent from the C/K. Other changes include a switch from painted metal parts to molded-in-color thermoplastic. GM found that while many truck buyers still wanted loads of chrome, plastic parts were likely to do well. The benefit was saving 30 to 50 percent in painting costs.

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Chevy 1500hd X

 

Other savings came from the Vortec iron block V8 family. While the competition was going for high-tech overhead cams, GM stuck with its push-rods. GM’s research showed that truck buyers didn’t really care, so long as the truck produced loads of power. Besides, sticking with a push-rod design saved GM $100 per engine.

The GMT800 made its debut in 1998 for the 1999 model year, with light trucks hitting the road first. Heavier trucks followed and a couple of years into production, GM brought back the heavy half.

Bigger, Better, and Stronger

Chevy 1500hd 12

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As Truck Trend writes, GM saw the success of the Ford F-150 SuperCrew and the Dodge Ram 1500 Quad Cab and decided it wanted to create its own “half-ton” with a giant cab, which hit the road in the 2001 model year.

The Silverado 1500HD starts off as a crew cab with a 6.6-foot bed. While not the longest Silverado 1500 on sale at the time, the 1500HD stretched out 19 feet with a wheelbase of 153 inches, ten inches of wheelbase longer than a Silverado 1500 with an extended cab and a short bed.

Chevrolet Us Silverado 2002 Images 10

Under the metal sat the chassis and running gear of a Silverado 2500, but pulled back a little. The only engine that was available was a Vortec 6000 6.0-liter V8 that made 300 HP and 360 lb-ft of torque. That power is backed by a 4l80E automatic transmission, is carried on 8-lug wheels, and is stopped with the brakes of a Silverado 2500. Since this was a burly truck, Chevy offered Quadrasteer four-wheel-steer to help you maneuver the beast. Without four-wheel-steer, the truck was practically a barge requiring 50 feet to turn around.

The big selling point of getting the 1500HD was that, at first, it was the only way to get a Silverado badged as a 1500 with a spacious four-door cab plus a big-ish bed. The 1500HD’s cab offered six more inches of legroom compared to the extended cab Silverado.

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Gmc Sierra 2002 Wallpapers 2

However, remember how I said this was essentially a Silverado 2500 calling itself a heavy 1500? This part matters too. In 2002, the most beefy Silverado 1500 netted you a GVWR of 6,400 pounds. Going for the 1500HD pumped that up to 8,600 pounds, the same as a Silverado 2500 with a regular cab and long box and the Silverado 2500 with an extended cab and short box.

Capacities were similarly hefty. In 2002, the best Silverado 1500 in terms of payload had a regular cab and a short box for 2,021 pounds of payload. The Silverado 1500HD came in with a monster 3,143 pounds of payload in rear-wheel-drive form and 2,847 pounds as a 4×4, not too far off of a 2500’s stats. It was a similar story with towing. A regular cab Silverado 1500 could tow up to 9,200 pounds but the Silverado 1500HD could handle up to 10,800 pounds, just like the 2500s.

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In other words, you more or less got a Silverado 2500, but with that bigger cab and badging that made the truck sound like a 1500HD. Some icing on the cake at the time was that standard Silverado 1500 buyers couldn’t get that 6.0-liter V8, either. Otherwise, your experience was similar to that of standard 1500 buyers, including a split-folding rear seat, a CD player, cruise control, and power accessories. Options included a limited-slip differential, a trailer hitch, tinted glass, forged aluminum wheels, power seats, and a combo cassette/CD player.

Thankfully, this truck isn’t so rare that nobody reviewed them. Here’s a snippet from a Truck Trend piece:

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The 1500HD’s 6.0L V-8 needs revs to work best, with only 400 rpm between rated horsepower and torque peaks. It’s not quite as smooth as the 4.8 or 5.3, but clearly has more grunt and gets this 3-ton truck moving with ease. We’d pay extra for the 4.10 gears–they give better performance while incurring little mileage penalty, and the tow rating rises to 10,000 lb. Big trucks rarely excel in minimum braking distances, and this Silverado was no different. But pedal feel, resistance to fade, and water-shedding ability are all quite acceptable. The steering is nicely weighted, and directional stability is good, indicative of the long wheelbase.

Occupants should find the front seats ideal, as many adjustments and fabric instead of slippery leather keep you from sliding sideways or submarining. Instrumentation is superb and includes transmission temperature as standard, and as an LS model, there’s less automation than the LT, for those who prefer to make decisions themselves.

By design and size, the 1500HD suffers when it comes to tight places, its 50-ft turning circle and 2.0 in. shy of 20-ft length conspiring to keep you away from garages and small villages. It’s not easy on gas, and the long wheelbase will end up pogo-sticking on frost heaves and expansion joints like a mechanical bull. But for something that does many things, this is hard to beat and an excellent illustration of why full-size pickups are still the best-selling-vehicle class.

2003 Chevrolet Silverado Img 527
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When new, Chevy sold the Silverado 1500HD for $29,425 ($52,095 today). If you wanted a splash of more luxury in your life, there was also the GMC Sierra 1500HD, which is said to be the rarer of the two. That one was $30,053 ($53,207 today). These trucks went up to bat against the Dodge Ram 1500 Quad Cab, which was $25,500 ($45,146 today), and the Ford F-150 SuperCrew, which was $32,000 ($56,654 today). Adding Quadrasteer to the 1500HD was at first $4,000 ($7,081 today) before falling to $2,000 ($3,540 today).

These weird trucks were sold until 2004, when GM finally got around to giving the standard 1500 a crew cab option. Buyers of 1500s were eventually able to nab those engines, too. But even then, the 1500 crew cab was stuck with a shorter 5.7-foot box and didn’t have the heavier-lifting capabilities. The 1500HD made a return a year later and sold until 2006. Chevy bowed the 1500HD out of production in 2007 with the 1500HD Classic.

Wallpapers Chevrolet Silverado 1

In terms of rarity, it would appear that these trucks aren’t that hard to find. This is one of those situations where “rare” means options like getting Quadrasteer. For example, GMC allegedly moved 39,006 Sierra 1500HDs in 2003, of which 3,912 are said to have Quadrasteer. One thing’s for sure, and it’s these trucks have huge fans.

If you want one of these beauts, I have good and bad news. The good news is that you can find them for under $10,000. The bad news is that those cheaper trucks tend to have terrible rust and a bunch of miles. Examples closer to pristine are said to get into the $20,000 range or more.

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So, if you’re a fan of the GMT800 and want something a little less common than the everyday 1500, the 1500HD might be your choice. It’s basically a 2500 cosplaying a 1500, targeting the kinds of people who wanted a really big truck but without having to commit to a heavier-duty nameplate. As we’ve seen with trucks like the Titan XD, these sort of heavy half trucks is a weird niche.

(Images: GM, unless otherwise noted.)

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Stef Schrader
Stef Schrader
14 days ago

See, this is what the Vulgar Chef needs if he’s going to refer to his vehicle as the Heavy Chevy.

Michael Hess
Michael Hess
15 days ago

First Gen Dodge MegaCab (3rd Gen RAM) was the same thing, 2500 chassis, softer springs, bigger cab. No 4 wheel steering or diesel, and boy do you feel it.

JDE
JDE
15 days ago

this was weird times. I think in 2003 they still had a jelly bean F250, while also offer the SuperDuty F250.

I do recall one of my favorite half tons. it was only 2WD, and had an eight foot bed and sat three (technically). But the factory 4 barrel 454 in 1976 was plenty stout and it hauled well. though, it also had two gas tanks and barely got 10 MPG with Gearing and girth, also Aerodynamics I imagine. still I wish it had survived the sand left at a light by a plow jockey.

Piston Slap Yo Mama
Piston Slap Yo Mama
15 days ago

I’m in no way a ‘truck guy’. I own a single-cab ’05 Sierra with the 4.8 and have nothing but praise for it. I am clueless as to why people feel compelled to buy new trucks when lovingly kept used gems like mine are on the market for pocket change.

That said, I’d kill for Quadrasteer. My 1988 Prelude Si had AWS and I loved it.

JDE
JDE
15 days ago

problem, even with the Prelude and other like it is parts unobtainium.

Piston Slap Yo Mama
Piston Slap Yo Mama
15 days ago
Reply to  JDE

While true, I sold my Prelude with 212k miles on it and never did anything to it beyond a timing belt and brake pads. The Quadrasteer is probably hard to source parts for, but the rest of the truck is more common than belly buttons.

Maxzillian
Maxzillian
15 days ago

I have a ’02 1500HD and I absolutely love the thing. Sadly it’s not the coveted quadrasteer so it does turn like a bus, but it was excellent bang for the buck. As stated in the article it’s basically a 2500, but takes a price hit because people mistake it for a mere half ton (although the 8 lug wheels should make people question that). The only thing it’s really lacking is that it’s a semi-floating rear axle and not the full-floater you’d find on the larger HD models.

The only real downside is the 6.0. It’s an excellent engine, but it drinks fuel like a 454. Most of my driving is all interstate, but in the last year of driving my worst mileage was 11 (while towing a vehicle) and my best was 13.4. It seems no matter what the load it loves to drink fuel, but at least it doesn’t dip into the single digits while towing…

Reasonable Pushrod
Reasonable Pushrod
15 days ago
Reply to  Maxzillian

So you are averaging in the 12-13 range? That actually doesn’t seem that bad. I had a 2003 Suburban Z71, that we only averaged 12-13 for it’s entire life. And towing it was in the single digits.

Maxzillian
Maxzillian
14 days ago

It’s not horrendous, no, but I can always want for me. What’s funny to me is that it doesn’t even seem to be much of an aerodynamic problem. I can drive at 50 mph and get roughly the same mileage I do at 80. The 6.0 is just inefficient as all hell under light loads.

That said, it’s not my daily driver so it really doesn’t matter.

Reasonable Pushrod
Reasonable Pushrod
14 days ago
Reply to  Maxzillian

No, it’s not great. But I guess I expected worst from the 6.0.

Acid Tonic
Acid Tonic
15 days ago
Reply to  Maxzillian

For reference I can eek 17ish mpg out of a 2010 F250 with a 3v 5.4.

But that is literally the best I could get and I am rather decent at hypermiling most vehicles well above their epa but 17 was the best I could get. 9-13 regular heavy foot driving.

Kevin B
Kevin B
15 days ago

I remember this commercial. As someone who hasn’t had enough practice backing up with a trailer (but I’m the king of parallel parking), this blew my mind.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q0pbf4uNp3I

Brian Stieh
Brian Stieh
15 days ago
Reply to  Kevin B

I remember every weekend there was a half hour infomercial talking about this truck and how most of it featured the quadrasteer

Shop-Teacher
Shop-Teacher
15 days ago

I would love to augment my ’06 Sierra crew cab, which has a 4.8 and 3.08:1 gears, with a 1500HD with the 6.0 and 4.10:1 gears for when I need to do heavier hauling.

Even me, the biggest GMT-800 fan, didn’t realize they offered the 1500HD with Quadrasteer. Definitely never seen one of those.

Username Loading...
Username Loading...
15 days ago

GMT800s are going to start to get more appreciated, the worst examples have decayed and are off the road so you are starting to see nicer ones. They are simple compared to today’s vehicles while still offering comfort and features most people want. They came stock with the engines many have spent thousands on swapping into earlier trucks and there is a bit of nostalgia with them for many. The rise of the 800 is coming, it happened to the squarebody, it continues to happen to the GMT400 and the GMT800 is next.

Anxious John
Anxious John
15 days ago

My dad had a 2000 model of just the regular 1500. That’s probably my favorite generation of GM truck. It absolutely took a beating, had like 200k miles and was still solid. I miss that truck.

Grey alien in a beige sedan
Grey alien in a beige sedan
15 days ago

Remember kids, Chrysler was going to release the Dodge Ram 1500 with Pentasteer™ but couldn’t find the fifth wheel under the truck to do so.

James McDonald
James McDonald
15 days ago

this site has more Holy Grails than Pottery Barn has wine glasses.

Lizardman in a human suit
Lizardman in a human suit
15 days ago
Reply to  James McDonald

Yup. And not one featured is my holy grail. Which is why we have so many.

Jochen Hoercher
Jochen Hoercher
16 days ago

Quadrasteer also was an option for the GMT800 Suburban 2500. That thing must be a hoot to drive with its (compared to the truck) short wheelbase…

Reasonable Pushrod
Reasonable Pushrod
15 days ago

Those are IMPOSSIBLE to find. We’ve had our eye out for one for a couple years. We love our non Quadrasteer Suburban 2500.

Hugh Crawford
Hugh Crawford
16 days ago

Talk about damming with faint praise “Big trucks rarely excel in minimum braking distances, and this Silverado was no different. But pedal feel, resistance to fade, and water-shedding ability are all quite acceptable” translation = the brakes feel like they work and they aren’t quite as bad in the dry compared to wet conditions,

Vee
Vee
16 days ago

My neighbour had one of these, in that champagne beige colour all Silverados of this vintage seemed to come in. It was a 2003 (meaning it had the stupid angry headlights) and he kept it up until he… I think died? Or maybe moved? In 2019. It had essentially become part of the architecture around here. I have not seen the truck since, despite the pristine condition it was kept in, so it wasn’t sold locally.

Anxious John
Anxious John
15 days ago
Reply to  Vee

Don’t disrespect the Cat Eye Silverado headlights, my dude.

Vee
Vee
14 days ago
Reply to  Anxious John

When you compare them to the rounded update of the C/K’s headlights they just look so wrong, though. They cut up into the hood in a kustomrama kind of way and the top edge of grille looks like it has a centerlining problem where it’s both above the inner corner of the headlights but also below the outer corner, and it’s not an even halfway between the two. Meanwhile the bottom section of the grille drops below the bottom edge of the lower DRLs and it gives the headlights this weird horizontally scrunched look. Plus Chevrolet added that odd hood bulge and cut out the bumper to cover up that the new grille didn’t fit. I know the new front end and the more prominent front fender flares were an attempt to both cash in on the Avalanche’s overwhelmingly positive reception and to distance the Silverado from the Sierra/Yukon and not part of GM’s original plans for the trucks. That really becomes apparent when you look at how they never bothered changing the Tahoe and Suburban, how the Trailblazer looked when it first came out, or how the ’00 Silverado SS Concept and the ’01 K5 Concept still used the ’98 face, which they wouldn’t have if they were indeed previewing future styling updates. That polygonal design language seemed to be destined for Cadillac with the ’02 Escalade and upcoming ’03 CTS and XLR, as was previewed by the Evoq and Imaj concepts.

Caraholic.
Caraholic.
16 days ago

Absolutely my favorite vehicle ever. It ran and ran. Ran better crappy then most new stuff I’ve had ran in newer lesser miles condition. Over built…….
98-2007…. I’d buy one now, new no questions asked. I’d pay a strong dollar too. Drove fantastic, reliable as a sunrise and wow could you beat it like a red headed step child lol. Just a fantastic generation….. wow

Squirrelmaster
Squirrelmaster
16 days ago

Back when these were new, my neighbor had a Sierra 1500HD with Quadrasteer. He was a jerk and an awful neighbor, but his truck was sweet and I was always a bit jealous of it – especially when I would watch how easily he could back his trailer down his driveway to behind his house. With that said, Quadrasteer parts are verging on non-existent these days…

IRegertNothing, Esq.
IRegertNothing, Esq.
15 days ago
Reply to  Squirrelmaster

“My neighbor sucked but I liked his truck” should be the name of a country song.

Squirrelmaster
Squirrelmaster
15 days ago

Too bad we can’t post .gifs so I could use the one of the old guy in the bar from The Wedding Singer saying “Sounds like a country song”.

Timbuck2
Timbuck2
16 days ago

My mom used to have a Tahoe of this generation when they were first released. It was my (and her) favorite vehicle she ever had. Went to 200k miles and was still running great, but the frame was completely rusted.

beachbumberry
beachbumberry
16 days ago

I love the concept of a heavy half and I’d argue a lot of the same ideas float around. The expedition max with the max tow package can tow 11,000lbs and is nearly the same size as an excursion. I’d do some digging but I bet most American trucks have similar packages

Oh! There gmt900 suburban could be had as a 2500 as well and gm has sold very small numbers of 2021-2023 suburban 2500’s for fleet and government use

Last edited 16 days ago by beachbumberry
Abdominal Snoman
Abdominal Snoman
16 days ago

IMO the far holier-grailier GMT800 was the GMC Yukon XL 2500 you could get with the 8.1L engine and same 4L80 / 2500 frame. The one I had weight 7860Lb with all the seats removed and half a tank of gas, and I never got above 10mpg on the highway, but I also never got below 7.5mpg with a 9000Lb trailer attached. It also fit in my garage with 1.5″ to spare length wise, and 1/4″ to spare height wise so whenever it snowed I had to deflate the tires, pull it out, then reinflate the tires.

Goose
Goose
15 days ago

Man, that brings back some memories from the earlyish aughts. I remember watching some Gumball Rally videos on repeat and there was some guy doing the event in his 2500 Avalanche outfitted to the hilt with radar/laser scanners and stupid amounts of power out of that 8.1L IIRC. Now I really want a HD Avalanche……

AlfaRomasochist
AlfaRomasochist
15 days ago

The 8.1 is a beast, but that 4L80 in the Suburbans and Avalanches is the weak link. The 8.1 trucks came with the Allison 1000 5-speed auto, which is a far more durable trans for heavy towing.

I bought a 2002 2500HD 4×4 Extended Cab / Short Bed with the 8.1 and Allison last week from the son of the original owner, who had just passed away. Still getting to know it but it tows night and day better than my former 1998 K2500 Suburban with the 7.4 Vortec and 4L80, and most of that is the transmission.

Andrew Daisuke
Andrew Daisuke
14 days ago

The 4L80E is the go to tranny of choice for cheap reliability, throw some billet 300M parts at it, and it’ll support 750hp all day, just take it out of D when you want to beat on it, that’s really the only problem with it.

There’s a reason they’re getting so hard to find in junkyards, because everyone in LS Swap world wants one.

LTDScott
LTDScott
16 days ago

A nice reminder that half ton trucks weren’t available with 4 doors until about the turn of the century, considering the vast majority of them are sold in that configuration today.

Back in ’96 I remember going to the local Ford dealer with my dad and seeing an OBS crew cab short bed F-150 for sale on the lot – not a factory combination. It was converted by Centurion, the same company who also built 4-door Broncos and dually van-trucks based on Ford E-series vans but designed to tow horse trailers, and I recall it being pretty expensive.

Evan McCausland
Evan McCausland
16 days ago
Reply to  LTDScott

IH’s Travellette appears to be the lone factory-built exception to the early “HDs ONLY” crew cab rule.

Vee
Vee
16 days ago
Reply to  LTDScott

My grandfather bought an F-150 XLT Crew Cab in 1995 and when I was growing up I always wondered why it was the only one like that around. A few years ago I found a spare key and a bunch of paperwork for it, including the custom order sheet that listed a “custom cab” and “three piece stripe tape”. It was then I realized that truck was one of a kind, and I’ve been looking for it ever since.

BolognaBurrito
BolognaBurrito
15 days ago
Reply to  LTDScott

International released the Travelette in 1957.

I think Dodge started offering crew-cab half-tons in the early ’80s.

LTDScott
LTDScott
15 days ago
Reply to  BolognaBurrito

International is an outlier. I’m 99.8% sure Dodge didn’t offer a 1/2 ton crew cab in the 1980s at all, as confirmed by two factory brochures I just looked at plus Auto Care Association catalog data I have through my work.

BolognaBurrito
BolognaBurrito
15 days ago
Reply to  LTDScott

1 of like 5 pick up brands isn’t an outlier. It’s a thing. Was it popular? No. But it sure as shit pokes a big as hole in the “they weren’t available!” argument. Plus, it was made for nearly 20 years.

Yeah, I just looked more; it was all D250 and D350s that were crew cab.

LTDScott
LTDScott
15 days ago
Reply to  BolognaBurrito

International was the least popular of the 5 pickup brands by far, and the Travelall/Travelette was discontinued by 1975. That is an outlier to me, especially in context of this article which is pointing out that ~2000 is really when trucks really started to become family vehicles more and work tools less, which was the primary motivation for the Big 3 to start offering crew cab half tons in the first place.

BolognaBurrito
BolognaBurrito
14 days ago
Reply to  LTDScott

It’s funny that people use the crew-cab as some how proof they started becoming more family vehicles, when crew-cabs largely were a Heavy Duty thing, because, you know, workmen needed to get to job sites and towing a trailer was easier than bringing a whole second truck.

And no, not an outlier.

LTDScott
LTDScott
14 days ago
Reply to  BolognaBurrito

I stand by what I said. Again, you seem to be missing the half-ton part of the equation. Yes, crew cabs were largely a heavy duty thing before the 1990s, hence why they were typically only available on 3/4 and 1-tons for a long time (as I pointed out on my original comment here about the Centurion-converted F-150, and also pointed out to counter your incorrect claim regarding Dodge making a 1/2-ton crew cab)

…until people increasingly wanted to put their family in a truck and not have the punishing ride associated with 250/350 trucks, which is how 1/2-ton crew cab trucks were born, and comes full circle to the point of this article, and my own point too.

Cam.man67
Cam.man67
16 days ago

I always enjoying seeing a decent Quadrasteer, but I’m just not a big fan of the GMT800 platform. Still though, every time I see one, it reminds me how much I’d like to try one out. Seems like a cool concept, and from what I understand, GM engineered it pretty well. I had a Heavy Half ‘79 C10 and it was a pretty decent tow pig…the 3.73s definitely helped.

Last edited 16 days ago by Cam.man67
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