Home » What Car Do You Find Yourself Defending The Most? Autopian Asks!

What Car Do You Find Yourself Defending The Most? Autopian Asks!

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We all contain multitudes, don’t we? That’s from the title of a novel I’ve never read and if I’m honest I don’t really get the significance of, but somehow it seemed like a good way to start this, because all of us as car lovers do have multitudes of ideas and feelings about all sorts of cars. And alongside the cars we love and admire and hate and revile there are those cars that, while they may not be our favorites, they’re cars that we feel strangely protective about. Cars that we have to speak up and defend when we hear them maligned, because deep down we know they deserve better.

I suspect we all have cars like this, leaking oil in the parking lot of our mind. Cars that we find ourselves in a genuine argument defending, as part of our brains float up and above, watching the conflict, wondering, hey, how did I get here? Why am I yelling at a dude for talking shit about a car I’ve never even owned? And yet here we are.

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Mercedes told me for her that car is the Smart ForTwo, and I get that. She’s owned several, and they’re often the target of ridicule, undeserved, I think. For me, I think there’s two: the Fiat 500L, which I’ve defended on these very pages, and also the Yugo, which takes an extraordinary amount of bullshit from the world at large, and I think, needs me to defend it.

I once made a whole video defending this car, which I now own:

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Man, now I’m getting worked up again, just imagining all the slights and eye rolls and dismissive comments that Yugos and 500Ls are inspiring, just by being mentioned. But I don’t think I’ll ever stop defending them.

Why am I like this? Who the hell knows? But I bet I’m not alone. I bet almost all of you have some sort of car you will always defend, and I want to know what they are, and why they make you feel the way you do, and how you defend them – everything. I want to know everything, always, forever.

So please tell me.

 

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No More Crossovers
No More Crossovers
1 month ago

for the longest time my friends would shit on the veloster N and stinger and would you look at that, now that they want something cheap, fun and newer, there’s a massively depreciated twin turbo v6 or turbo 4 hothatch on the horizon!

Turkina
Turkina
1 month ago

I’d definitely pick up a Stinger if I had the resources and a space in my driveway. Good size and great for long drives chewing up miles and scenery. And none of the German engineering anxiety of random overly computerized things going wrong.

No More Crossovers
No More Crossovers
1 month ago
Reply to  Turkina

Hey! Sure my GTI backup camera will probably cost a chunk of the car’s worth to fix when one of a million moving parts goes wrong but at least I don’t have to wipe grime off of it.

Andrea Petersen
Andrea Petersen
1 month ago

I’ve spent the last 12 years of my life furiously defending Fiat and the last 4 or so defending Lancia. I owe pretty much everything in my life short of my husband and daughter to the glorious world of Italian heaps and I will accept no ill spoken of them.

AssMatt
AssMatt
1 month ago

The worst Ferrari.

Ben
Ben
1 month ago

Steaming hot take: The Pontiac Sunfire and the Jeep Liberty

They were my first two cars so I’m sure there’s some Stockholm syndrome going on, but I also think they both fill a niche that everyone complains isn’t today – cheap, basic transportation.

That’s why I bought both of them. I picked up the Sunfire new because I was starting an internship and to save money on housing I had a bit of a commute and needed a reliable car. Other than basic maintenance and a couple of flat tires I never had to do anything to it. It had plenty of drawbacks, but it was the right car for me at that point in my life. Plus it was a manual.

The Jeep was similar. I wanted to get a camper and the Liberty was the cheapest way to tow 5000 lbs. And it was a lot more fun to drive in the winter around here. I even took it to an off road park, where I discovered that it’s less fun to take your daily to one of those places because the consequences for breaking something are more serious. 😉

It had plenty of drawbacks too. Mileage was terrible, power was mediocre at best, and the interior was solid hard plastic. But it did the job and Jeep might be in a better place today if they hadn’t abandoned the entry-level market for their vehicles.

UnseenCat
UnseenCat
1 month ago

Various mid-80s through mid-90s GM cars. GM produced plenty of affordable cars through that era that were better than their just-adequate offerings of previous Malaise Era years — and often all the power/performance an average buyer really wanted without being overly finicky. And parts/service easily available just about anywhere. They did a lot with advancing 6-cylinder and front drive performance. And then every so often they’d manage to keep the bean counters and management looking the other way long enough to slip out some very nice packages on top of durable, serviceable platforms. GM also tended to have a good handle on keeping aero styling attractive and streamlined without going full jelly-bean. (Never go full jelly-bean.)

Just as you could play the options lists to get hard-edged performance out of the Camaros/Firebirds and Corvettes of the era, it was sometimes possible on other models as well. The Z52-package Corsica sedan I had was quite adept a showing its taillights to other cars with sporting or performance aspirations. Where GM lacked some of the sophistication of the imports, they made up for in brash power plus engineering know-how to fine tune their relatively simple but durable suspension designs.GM of the era was skilled at turning “good enough” into “more than enough”.

Other cars… Studebaker! They didn’t have the resources of the Big Three, but the boys in South Bend wrung all they could out of solid designs. And topped it with some very pretty Raymond Loewy styling. Also, I’m from the area and I’m loyal to the “home team”, so there’s that.

Various Eastern Bloc cars from the Cold War era. They were designed to be cheap and sturdy, and survive in environments that lacked the well-maintained roads and surplus of parts and service availability of the West. What they lack in sophistication and comfort, they make up for in clever simplicity. (Although Soviet ZiL limousines are pretty darn impressive in all respects; add another item to my wishlist of irrational I-want-that cars. And Tatras are just amazing.)

B3n
B3n
1 month ago

Nissans. I’ve had no issues with our D40 Frontier and Y62 Armada, both of them have been dead reliable so far.
The Frontier is super simple and easy to work on. The Armada is a bit more complex mechanically, but still easy to do DIY maintenance.
Also, Fiat. My MK2 Uno was very reliable despite me putting it through hell delivering pizzas on rural dirt roads and not being able to afford any maintenance. It never missed a beat.

Matt Sexton
Matt Sexton
1 month ago

I’ll defend my Yugo right along with you Torch.

I have a 924 now as well, and I find myself just happily accepting it for what it is, and encourage others to do the same.

Also scooters. Scooters are awesome. People need to get over themselves.

Last edited 1 month ago by Matt Sexton
Jatco Xtronic CVT
Jatco Xtronic CVT
1 month ago

The Nissan Juke. It’s really not all that bad looking. And of course, the Juke comes with the fuel efficient, smooth power, and hassle-free Jatco CVT. What’s not to love?

Last edited 1 month ago by Jatco Xtronic CVT
Rob Schneider
Rob Schneider
1 month ago

Yes, it is that bad looking. Mechanical and packaging considerations do a lot to redeem it, but aesthetically it’s hideous. (This from someone who actually gave some thought to buying one. At the end of the day, no… Just no.)

Jatco Xtronic CVT
Jatco Xtronic CVT
1 month ago
Reply to  Rob Schneider

You know the saying “a face only a mother could love”? I am the Juke’s adoptive mother, and I love its ugly little face. However, it’s not just form over function. The transmission (unless you get a yucky manual, its achilles heel) is its true selling point. No need for harsh shifts that jostle the cabin or complicated gears, just smooth, efficient power delivery. ???? ???? ???? ???? ???? ????

Rob Schneider
Rob Schneider
1 month ago

Well, Mama Bear, I respect your opinion on your adopted automotive child. You’re proving the point in Torch’s article, and doing it well. I am humbled.

Last edited 1 month ago by Rob Schneider
The Artist Formerly Known as the Uncouth Sloth
The Artist Formerly Known as the Uncouth Sloth
1 month ago

need to bring in/back the downvote button

Jatco Xtronic CVT
Jatco Xtronic CVT
1 month ago

There’s no such thing as a bad opinion! Unless you like transmissions with ge@rs. That’s just not right.

Nsane In The MembraNe
Nsane In The MembraNe
1 month ago

Absolutely. Gears reduce efficiency and smoothness and shifting is a hindrance. The glorious Jatco CVT solves all of those programs and is perfectly reliable in all applications!

Nsane In The MembraNe
Nsane In The MembraNe
1 month ago

Oh I disagree, I think this bit is hilarious

Bongo Friendee Harvey Park
Bongo Friendee Harvey Park
1 month ago

The Juke, Kicks, Cube, and first generation Murano all look good. Fite me h8ers

Robby Roadster
Robby Roadster
1 month ago

2006-2008 MKV Volkswagen GTI. They have a few flaws like the fuel pump cam follower that needs replacing every 10k miles, the definite fact that the headliner will transform into a curtain, carbon buildup from direct injection, and general VW component failure of things that should not have been made of plastic or needlessly involved a small servo motor.

Those things aside, I absolutely adore my partners MKV. It’s gone from 164k-207k miles under our care and gets thrashed at Autocross every year. It has wonderful styling inside and out, truly the iPod nano of vehicles from the early 2000s. It’s a pleasure to drive; quiet and composed on the highway, faster than it should be on course or back roads, and a great skihicle (ski vehicle) each winter.

Personally I think this platform is at the peak of the hothatch bellcurve, there are plentiful unmodified examples available for around 5k and parts are readily available and affordable.

PL71 Enthusiast
PL71 Enthusiast
1 month ago
Reply to  Robby Roadster

The EA113 is a legendary engine. The cam follower really isn’t a big deal because they’re cheap and easy to replace. It’s one of the first viable turbo 4s and also one of the best.

Clark B
Clark B
1 month ago
Reply to  Robby Roadster

I had a 2009 GTI and I absolutely adored that car. It was my daily through college and also doubled as my track day car. Alas, it was totaled with only 60k miles on it when someone pulled out from a side street without looking.

Fast forward to today, I’ve got a 2014 Sportwagen TDI, which rides on the same platform as my GTI did. It’s getting new lowering springs and shocks soon, and a tune in the not too distant future. Basically, I’m building myself a station wagon GTI. It’s a great platform for sure.

Nsane In The MembraNe
Nsane In The MembraNe
1 month ago

Oh and I will defend the Gen 6 Camaro until the day I die. Everyone always rolls their eyes and is like OKAY BUDDY THAT’S A COMPENSATION VEHICLE FOR TOXIC MEN WITH SMALL PPS and I’m like “it’s actually in contention for the greatest affordable sports car ever made but if you want to deprive yourself of experiencing one because of dated stereotypes then go off I guess”

Jack Trade
Jack Trade
1 month ago

I think one of the things that optically harms it in many peoples’ view is that there aren’t a ton of coupes around anymore. So it really stands out, which not only makes it more visible to regular drivers to nitpik about but also incentivizes a certain sort of buyer who values attention perhaps more than other things.

Nsane In The MembraNe
Nsane In The MembraNe
1 month ago
Reply to  Jack Trade

You can drive a Camaro antisocially very easily regardless of which engine you opt for. They’re also much more forgiving than a Mustang or Challenger is, so even drivers of questionable ability can get away with a fair amount before it goes south. That platform is so goddamn good that you really need to go full monkey mode to unsettle it. The things are absolute weapons on a track.

Bongo Friendee Harvey Park
Bongo Friendee Harvey Park
1 month ago

You can drive a Hyundai antisocially too. It’s not the car, it’s the bubba. Shitting on a car because of its typical owners is dumb.

Jimmy7
Jimmy7
1 month ago

I spent a lot of time trying to defend and explain the Chevy Volt in the early days. So then I bought a Corvair.

Jim Stock
Jim Stock
1 month ago

EASY QUESTION:
My Jeep Wrangler. It has been super reliable for 12 years and my friends and I actually off-road our jeeps at least monthly.

Jack Trade
Jack Trade
1 month ago

The SN95 Mustang for sure.

Perhaps the most unloved at this point (the IIs now have a rose-colored view of the ’70s built into people’s perception), they’re neither the easily-modded Fox body drag racers of popular conception nor the retro and big power versions of 2005+, and they definitely sport currently reviled, era-specific styling.

But in many ways, they’re the final version of the original Mustang – a raw, visceral sporty (but not sportscar) two door that prized affordability and fun over things like build quality or technological currency.

With the S197, the Mustang started its journey to becoming what it is now, a proper sportscar, but the SN95 offered a very direct connection to the original lineage, whether you liked it or not.

I’ve always found that cool and worthy, even as most people don’t. Something about how it exists independently of you, and you have to accept/conform yourself to its quirks and features, as distinct from the way that a lot of contemporary vehicles promise you everything you want all the time as long as you’re willing to pay.

Last edited 1 month ago by Jack Trade
Manwich Sandwich
Manwich Sandwich
1 month ago

I find myself defending Teslas more than any other vehicle… mainly due to the Anti-BEV crowd and anti-Tesla crowd.

Now I’m not saying Tesla vehicles or the company are perfect. But some of the lies and BS some say about the cars and the company are just ridiculous.

Spikersaurusrex
Spikersaurusrex
1 month ago

I have somehow, inexplicably, found myself defending the Cybertruck. I don’t want to defend it; I think it looks terrible and wow, the build problems. BUT, it’s a car, and this is a place to support different people and their different car choices. I don’t get the appeal of Jeeps or SUVs and I have an irrational dislike of Toyota, but other people love them, and that gives them value. The same goes for the Cybertruck. Rag on Musky all you like, same as Barra, Ghosn, or that guy from Stellantis. They’re all people and should be accountable for their actions. Leave the cars, and the people who love them alone.

Spikersaurusrex
Spikersaurusrex
1 month ago

Just remembered the name of the guy from Stellantis – Jon Lovitz

VanGuy
VanGuy
1 month ago

I agree. Cybertrucks are bad in many, many ways, but I think there’s something admirable about taking a divisive vehicle design like that to mass market.

Now if someone would use this power for good to get us vehicles and trucks with lower, sloping hoods that are less dangerous for pedestrians…

V10omous
V10omous
1 month ago

Now this is a bold take, and I respect it.

No offense to those who put minivans and wagons and such for their answer, but you’re not exactly risking blowback.

Last edited 1 month ago by V10omous
Bongo Friendee Harvey Park
Bongo Friendee Harvey Park
1 month ago

Agreed! The CT is a monstrosity and Musk needs a lobotomy, but at least they tried something new. People are always bitching about all cars looking the same. The CT doesn’t look like anything else.

VanGuy
VanGuy
1 month ago

Full-size passenger and conversion vans; and separately, Priuses.

At least, when attacked in categories they are actually proficient in.

Vans are so practical and so many pickup owners (not all, but many) would be better off with vans for what they’re doing.

Geo Metro Mike
Geo Metro Mike
1 month ago

Mods. If it’s not portraying a symbol of hate or violence, I try to come up with some positive aspect to a “that’s stupid” remark. Hey, it’s their car, they love it, let ’em do what they want to it. Just don’t use it to be a jerk: coal roll with oversized tail pipe, tailgate with angry headlamp Jeep, rev a crackaly exhaust right next to my driver side window.

Abe Froman
Abe Froman
1 month ago
Reply to  Geo Metro Mike

Absolutely this. In fact, I’m more of a “stock 4 lyfe” person. I’m friends with “mod all the things” people. Sometimes, I find myself defending both sides of the equation- the “how can you be happy with a stock vehicle” and “why would someone do X to that car?” At the end of the day my taste in someone else’s vehicle doesn’t matter. They (presumably) like it, and it’s theirs to enjoy. Even the angry Jeeps.

PlatinumZJ
PlatinumZJ
1 month ago

I own two Grand Cherokees (’97 and ’09), so…… ^_^ I’ve experienced the faults of each, but after several hundred thousand miles (combined), I’m still beyond pleased with both.

Recently I made the mistake of participating in an automotive thread on a non-automotive website, and made the grave error of questioning how Consumer Reports rates the ride quality of the Wrangler, and oooooooooo boy did I ever touch a nerve with that one.

Sensual Bugling Elk
Sensual Bugling Elk
1 month ago

Modern Saabs. As the twice-owner of a 9-5, I’ve had a surprising number of conversations about my car start with “aren’t those things garbage?”

Col Lingus
Col Lingus
1 month ago

Yes. And the same for the Sonnet.

Inthemikelane
Inthemikelane
1 month ago
Reply to  Col Lingus

Former Saab owner, last one was a 9-3 convertible. Had a guy pull up next to me in his huge truck and tell me the 9-3 was a p*ssy car. I laughed and told him it’d blow the doors off his truck in every way except carry capacity. Why people have to be so stupid…

ColoradoFX4
ColoradoFX4
1 month ago

First gen Taurus. Many just think of a worn out hand-me-down or abused rental car, but in reality these were revolutionary vehicles that changed the expectation of mainstream family sedans, saved Ford from financial ruin, and reinvigorated the idea that an American company could engineer and build a world class vehicle. I will defend it to my death.

Jack Trade
Jack Trade
1 month ago
Reply to  ColoradoFX4

I’m with ya 100%. Their impact cannot be overstated. The problem is at this point is most people’s perceptions of the Taurus are shaded by either the horrible 3rd generation ovoid one or the final cool but man she’s kinda big version.

The styling influenced that of an entire decade. How many single models really do that?

ColoradoFX4
ColoradoFX4
1 month ago
Reply to  Jack Trade

I actually don’t hate the 3rd gen, and that’s probably due to a combination of my parents having two of them (’96 Sable G, ’97 Taurus G) and having a generally good experience with both, and reading Car, which really illustrates an awful lot of work went into that car even if the end result wasn’t received well.

Taargus Taargus
Taargus Taargus
1 month ago
Reply to  ColoradoFX4

Whoever these anti-Taurii types are they’d better hush.

I love the first Taurus, and I’m even a second gen apologist (and 90’s Ford apologist in general). Every first-gen I sat in as a kid was basically the best case scenario for me. And I still think they look good. The Taurus was proof that an American company could still build a compelling product that was equally as good or better than the Japanese.

MAX FRESH OFF
MAX FRESH OFF
1 month ago
Reply to  ColoradoFX4

My buddy’s mom had a first-gen SHO Taurus when I was a kid and that thing was sweet.

Bongo Friendee Harvey Park
Bongo Friendee Harvey Park
1 month ago
Reply to  ColoradoFX4

Wait people disrespect the Taurus??

ColoradoFX4
ColoradoFX4
1 month ago

Shocking, I know, but unfortunately true.

Mr. Frick
Mr. Frick
1 month ago

Both generations of Scion xB. I bought a 2nd gen new and currently daily a 1st gen. Folks would ask me why I wanted such an odd looking, cheap car. They are cheap – to own and drive. Regular maintenance is key. Fun to drive fast, tons of room and nobody sees you. Looking for a 2nd gen manual now.

Mike B
Mike B
1 month ago

Lately it’s the Toyota 2.4 turbo in the TNGAF platform. I’m defending the turbo itself more than anything else, I’m definitely not a yota fanboy, however as an owner of a 17 y/o Volvo still running the OEM turbo at 233K miles, I’m not at all worried about the reliability. SO many of the detractors think that turbos immediately grenade at 100 or 150K miles or require expensive extra maintenance.

As a 4Runner owner that also likes Jeeps and Broncos (probably more than the 4R actually) I find myself defending those quite often as well.

Back when they were new, I defended the 04-07 GTO a lot too.

Squirrelmaster
Squirrelmaster
1 month ago

While I will give a pass on the Yugo, the 500L is simply not good.

As for vehicles that I will defend, it is the Firestone-tire-era second gen Ford Explorer. They are reliable, (mostly) easy to work on, and got heavily maligned by something that wasn’t really the fault of the vehicle and can be resolved by a simple tire change. I’ve owned many and just added another to my fleet as a project vehicle.

I’ll also add the 60s-80s Triumphs and MGs we got here stateside. They don’t get nearly as much love as they deserve, at least relative to some of the beloved American crap that was produced during those times.

Mike B
Mike B
1 month ago
Reply to  Squirrelmaster

Yeah, those pre-crossover Ex’s are solid. I rarely see them in my area anymore, but they used to be EVERYWHERE. I think they’re a great size for a budget trail rig or overlander, especially if one has the skill to swap a D44 under the front of it.

Squirrelmaster
Squirrelmaster
1 month ago
Reply to  Mike B

That’s my current plan. I just put some lift springs in the rear and am on the hunt for a Wagoneer front D44 or JK D44. I’m still trying to figure out if I want to go the easy route and go leaf springs up front or if I want to go the hard route with a 3-link. Luckily the 8.8″ in the rear is pretty stout, so I can just do an SOA on that once the front axle is in. I’m not planning to go any bigger than 37s, and will probably stick with 35s so I don’t force myself to swap in D60s.

Mike B
Mike B
1 month ago
Reply to  Squirrelmaster

Sounds like an awesome project!

Ford Magnet
Ford Magnet
1 month ago
Reply to  Mike B

That’s what I’ve done with mine. 2001 Mountaineer V8, all the V8s came with AWD but you can swap the transfer case from an F150 to make it 4WD with low range. That plus screwing in the torsion beam bolts and add a leaf in the rear and 31″ tires will get you through any overland trail. I’ve had some fun in Moab with it and around Colorado. You don’t need anything more unless you want to rock crawl.

Pit-Smoked Clutch
Pit-Smoked Clutch
1 month ago
Reply to  Squirrelmaster

I owned a second Gen explorer.

V8. AWD. 11 MPG.

Baby it. Womp on it. It doesn’t care. 11 MPG ALL DAY.

I’m usually the one defending inefficienct vehicles, because fuel cost is only one component of a decision, and unless you drive a lot of miles, it’s probably a pretty small component. 11 MPG is not a small component. 11 MPG at typical annual mileage is a car payment worth of gas bill.

Squirrelmaster
Squirrelmaster
1 month ago

Interesting. I have owned five V6 second gen Explorers and the lowest average fuel economy of any of them was my 1995 with the 4-speed automatic transmission at 15mpg combined. The others normally got 17-19 combined, with my current one averaging 18mpg so far.

My third gen Explorer with the 4.6L V8 got 15mpg whether it was summer or winter, city or highway. The V10 F250 that replaced that Explorer was even worse, getting 10mpg whether it was empty or if it had 4000lbs in the bed or 5000lbs in a trailer behind it, but it towed that trailer a lot better the the IRS-equipped Explorer.

Pit-Smoked Clutch
Pit-Smoked Clutch
1 month ago
Reply to  Squirrelmaster

Mine was a ’97, so all the factors making yours get 15 MPG, plus a notoriously thirsty V8, viscous coupler always-on AWD, and still a 4 speed transmission.

It did more like 18 highway, but I was 100% city in those days, commuting to college during the part of the recession when jobs that paid in anything other than experience were a myth.

Ford Magnet
Ford Magnet
1 month ago

Gets about 5-6 MPG when you take it offroad lol, but I get closer to 15 with highway driving in mine

MrLM002
MrLM002
1 month ago

Not so much a single car, rather a drivetrain type: Actively air cooled batteries (for BEVs)

It seems that everyone who hears air cooled batteries hears Nissan Leaf, and immediately says all air cooled batteries are shit because the Nissan Leaf is the only BEV in the US sold with an air cooled battery. However the Nissan Leaf’s battery is PASSIVELY air cooled, and anyone who has owned a passively cooled laptop and an actively cooled laptop can tell you that almost always the actively cooled laptop performs better.

Active air cooling for electronics makes a ton of sense and BEVs are no different. In fact active air cooling should improve winter performance of BEVs as they have less thermal mass to get up to the optimal battery temp, no coolant leaks, and lighter weight (when properly designed).

Sensual Bugling Elk
Sensual Bugling Elk
1 month ago
Reply to  MrLM002

This reminds me of why Soichiro Honda was opposed to liquid cooling for so long. “All engines are ultimately air-cooled.”

Last edited 1 month ago by Sensual Bugling Elk
JerryLH3
JerryLH3
1 month ago

Anything with a rotary engine. Hear me out…

Rotaries don’t make great mass-market cars. The reputation as completely unreliable is partially undeserved, but not entirely. They can’t be mistreated like some reciprocating piston engines can and still run for hundreds of thousands of miles. Some of Mazda’s rotaries were more reliable than others, but they all can be reliable if you start with a well built clean sheet engine and are willing to go the extra mile in care and maintenance (premix, running to redline frequently, regular oil changes, and more depending on which engine).

I think the most bulletproof of all of was the normally aspirated engines in the FC, particularly the S5 variety. Those things loved to be taken to redline often, could run on 87 octane with no fear, and are incredibly easy to work on with no turbos and supporting equipment in the engine bay.

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