Home » You Can Buy A Gorgeous Jaguar F-Type For Less Than A New Ford Edge

You Can Buy A Gorgeous Jaguar F-Type For Less Than A New Ford Edge

Jaguar F Type Gg Ts
ADVERTISEMENT

If you were to compile a list of the best 21st century sports cars, it’s almost certain that the Jaguar F-Type would be on it. This fiery, breathtaking effort from Jaguar was a moment of triumph that captivated car enthusiasts the world over when it first went on sale in 2013. Sure, it may have been priced close to a Porsche 911 without offering quite the same objective performance, but who cared when it looked this good?

Thankfully, depreciation is one hell of a drug, and you can now pick up a used F-Type for less than a base-model 2024 Ford Edge. Oh, and that’s before I even mention the sheer selection you have in that price bracket. Welcome back to Gavel Gazing, where we highlight what’s piqued our interest at automobile auctions as of late. Let’s crack on with it.

Vidframe Min Top
Vidframe Min Bottom

What Are We Looking At?

Jaguar F-Type Profile

Picture this: It’s 2012, and Jaguar is in the middle of its comeback season. After dazzling buyers with its thoroughly modern XF and XJ, it dropped a two-seat bombshell right between the Porsche Cayman and Porsche 911. With a curvaceous aluminum body, supercharged V6 or V8 power, and an evocative soundtrack, the F-Type was an instant object of desire. It was also where the modern trend of exhaust crackles really found traction, for better or worse.

Over the years, the F-Type offered something for everyone. We’re talking manual or automatic transmissions, rear-wheel-drive or all-wheel-drive, four, six, or eight cylinders, coupe or convertible bodystyles. It’s been a smorgasbord of sports car choice, and despite a curb weight usually landing on the heavy side of 3,500 pounds, it’s a driver’s delight. As Motor Trend quipped about the base car:

ADVERTISEMENT

 The steering is simply excellent — just the right effort, delicious feel, and exactly the rare characteristic of vacuuming its nose into corners that I like. Throttle response is instant, as the torque converter locks once into second gear, and the suspension expertly blends very modest roll angles with an appropriately taut ride quality. (Only here and there are the g’s at the bottom dips dismaying).

Sure, it might not quite have the poise of a Porsche Cayman or the pack-a-punch of the Chevrolet Corvette, but the Jaguar F-Type remains champagne with a 200-mph speedometer, a beautiful firework of a sports car that just makes you and everyone around you feel good. It’s extroverted without having a distinct air of mid-life crisis, a fine tightrope for a sports car to walk.

How Much Are We Talking?

F-Type V6 S Coupe

Believe it or not, a 2024 Ford Edge SE starts at $39,960 including freight. Yeah, that’s a mildly ridiculous figure for what you’re getting. However, if you look around even the internet’s leading auction sites for an early F-Type, you can find them going for massively less money than nigh-on $40,000. For starters, here’s a 2015 F-Type S coupe with the 380-horsepower supercharged V6 that sold on Bring A Trailer in late December for $28,000. Yep, $28,000.

F-Type V6 S Coupe Interior

This thing isn’t a shitbox either. At the time of sale, it had 48,745 miles on the clock, a clean Carfax, and just two previous owners. What’s more, it comes with the Premium Pack, Climate Pack, Performance Pack, and Extended Leather Pack. That’s a lot of packs, but they all mean you get goodies like performance seats, a switch to make the exhaust louder, a limited-slip rear differential, and adaptive xenon headlights. Make no mistake, this is a well-equipped sports car for downright sensible money.

ADVERTISEMENT

F-Type Cabriolet

However, what if you want to go topless? Well, this 2014 F-Type S cabriolet with just 27,000 miles sold on Bring A Trailer in December for just $32,500. Same 380 horsepower supercharged V6 as the coupe I just showed you, same eight-speed automatic transmission, less roof. It even comes with a Jaguar-branded battery maintainer for winter storage, which gives some confidence that this cat was properly fed and kept.

F-Type R Convertible

Mind you, six cylinders just isn’t enough for some people. After all, the F-Type is heavy for a sports car, and the big grunt of the V8 cars is seriously impressive. No sweat, this 27,000-mile 2018 F-Type R cabriolet sold for $36,666 on Cars & Bids on New Year’s Eve, and it looks like an absolute ripper. Not only does it boast 550 horsepower, it comes from the era of the F-Type’s first facelift, so it gets different bumpers and skirts, new lights, new wheels, and lighter seats than early cars. Visually, this is my favorite era of F-Type, and it’s astonishing to see them drop into semi-sensible pricing territory.

F Type Manual

ADVERTISEMENT

The Holy Grail of F-Types is the V6 manual model, and guess what? A few of those have crept into sensible pricing territory as well. Here’s one that came up for sale on Cars & Bids last month, and it sold for just $32,750. Granted, it’s the entry-level 340-horsepower supercharged V6 car, and it has a few cosmetic imperfections, but it sounds like an absolute treat for that sort of money, especially with just 46,700 miles on the clock.

What Goes Wrong?

Jaguar F Type Engine

Hey, remember that Jaguar five-liter V8 that suffers from timing system issues that could cause catastrophic engine damage? Yeah, that’s the V8 in the F-Type, and the V6 is essentially the same engine with blanks plugging two cylinders. Thankfully, as we noted in an earlier article, these timing system issues seem to have been resolved in 2016, so that’s a year worth aiming for.

Speaking of engine issues, how about cooling system annoyances? I’m talking about plastic cooling pipes that crack and early water pumps that fail, or as older BMW owners say, normal maintenance items. Any time you’re replacing plastic cooling pipes on any car, save yourself some heartache and do it all in one go. If one pipe’s failed, another one likely isn’t far behind.

Jaguar F-Type Undercarriage

ADVERTISEMENT

While we’re on the subject of leaks, British Jaguar Land Rover specialists K Motors report that F-Types can suffer from leaky rear differential pinion seals. This is a job that’s fairly labor-intensive to sort, requiring removal of the pumpkin and disassembly of the innards. Needless to say, differential bearings don’t like a lack of lubrication, but this is an easy issue to spot in a pre-purchase inspection.

Another potential issue is that if the valves on the optional performance exhaust system aren’t opened and closed from time to time, they could seize. A bad vacuum pump could also contribute to improper exhaust system operation. You may be able to fix this with a bit of lubrication and working the actual flap mechanisms back and forth, you may require a new vacuum pump, or you may need to replace the entire muffler.

Jaguar F-Type Air Vents

Inside the F-Type, the center HVAC vents are motorized, and the mechanisms can bind. Thankfully, owners on the forums report that you may be able to fix this issue for nigh-on free by just removing the vents, sanding the pivot points to eliminate binding, lubricating said pivot points, and then slapping everything back together.

Should You Buy A Cheap F-Type?

Jaguar F-Type Rear

ADVERTISEMENT

Usually, it’s a bad idea to buy a heavily-depreciated luxury car over something new and normal. In this case, it’s a maybe, depending on prior maintenance history and year of manufacture. If it’s a 2016 or newer car with the revised timing chains, it may be worth a punt provided you’re not looking to hold onto it forever. Likewise, if a 2015 or earlier car has already received timing system repairs with updated parts, that’s an option worth considering. However, if you’re looking for something flawless, a used F-Type probably isn’t the car for you. If you’re looking for something cheap to run, then it definitely isn’t.

2009 Cayman S

If you’re looking for something with fewer known problems than an F-Type, why not buy a 2009 to 2011 987.2 Porsche Cayman or Boxster? This brief model run marked the introduction of the 9A1 engine to the mid-engined Porsche family, a naturally-aspirated flat-six that doesn’t suffer from any of the IMS bearing issues previous water-cooled Porsches are known for. The clutch interlock switch, a $50 part on FCP Euro, can go bad from time to time, and the shifter cables do wear with mileage, but these things are otherwise bulletproof. You can find decent ones for just north of $30,000, and they truly are a ton of sports car for the money.

Of course, if you do buy a Cayman, you won’t get a 21 gun salute exhaust, or cause many pedestrians to turn their heads as you drive past. The F-Type does a special trick of making you feel godly even if you’re on the most boring road in the world, and aren’t we all searching for a little bit of pantomime?

(Photo credits: Cars & Bids, Bring A Trailer)

ADVERTISEMENT

Support our mission of championing car culture by becoming an Official Autopian Member.

Relatedbar

Got a hot tip? Send it to us here. Or check out the stories on our homepage.

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on whatsapp
WhatsApp
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on reddit
Reddit
Subscribe
Notify of
32 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Mo smith
Mo smith
4 months ago

I would like to share my experience with the jag F type. When I could no longer replace my manual transmission, BMW Z4 with another one, as BMW stopped offering The car with the manual transmission, it opened up the search for an automatic transmission roadster. That’s when I bought a preowned 2014 V6 F type S. I had the car for five years, and it was completely reliable with the exception of having to replace a plastic cooling system pipe. The car was still in its new car warranty, but Jag considered the part a wear and tear item and didn’t warranty it! I fought it to no avail. It was a terrific car, but the piece missing was that it didn’t have a manual. After three years of looking, I finally found a 2016 manual transmission type S. The car is clearly faster with the eight speed automatic, but it is such a joy to drive with the Manuel. It’s all about the involvement. And as the car has fewer gears, it stays in one gear longer, which lets you enjoy the glorious exhaust note. it sounds like a flat plane, crank exotic! And there is this delightful grow on the overrun when you lift to change gears. You don’t get that with the automatic because you don’t lift! Completely different driving experience. The car continues to be very reliable.

Seaway
Seaway
5 months ago

I have one as a daily. A 2015 V6S with about 54,000 miles. I skipped the V8 as I was not looking for a muscle car and 380hp feels about right to go pick up the groceries.

The maintenance issues are pretty basic, pretty well documented and fairly expensive. The plastic coolant pipes is about a $2200 job, you will need injectors at some point for around the same cost. And those pops and bangs don’t come free – the cats fail pretty early and the stock items are VERY expensive. Like it’s cheaper to spend $1400 and get a tune for an additional $1000 than it is to replace the stock cats with stock cats.

I wouldn’t consider the V6 manual as anything approaching the “holy grail” for this car. That would obviously be the SVR. The manual is slower than any other spec of this car and the transmission itself is reportedly not that great. The ZF 8 speed, on the other hand, is amazing.

Carbon Fiber Sasquatch
Carbon Fiber Sasquatch
5 months ago

I was literally just thinking about this car. It sounds like a great 2nd car but maybe not a DD

PaysOutAllNight
PaysOutAllNight
5 months ago

If there’s one car I lust for more than any other, it’s an F-Type convertible.

But it scares my wallet so very much.

Even if I hated money, I don’t think I would buy one in an online auction.

Mechjaz
Mechjaz
5 months ago

> This thing isn’t a shitbox either.

Damnit, I’m out

Alan Tate
Alan Tate
5 months ago

Having drooled over the car for a couple years, I finally dove in by purchasing a 2016 S with only 12.5k miles. It was local and checked all the option boxes I considered must have.

The V6 has plenty of power. I now think that if you get the R, you better get AWD. Mine can light up the back tires very easily. An extra 200 hp on the wet roads around Seattle would make life full of unwanted excitement.

For those on the fence, go for it. You will not regret it.

Last edited 5 months ago by Alan Tate
Bongo Friendee Harvey Park
Bongo Friendee Harvey Park
5 months ago
Reply to  Alan Tate

I will pretend I didn’t read that

Defenestrator
Defenestrator
4 months ago
Reply to  Alan Tate

I rented a RWD V8S for a few days once. It definitely had a solid 100HP more than it had any idea how to use. At 45mph mid-RPM in a straight line with all the nannies on, stomping the gas still got the rear squirrely.

Vic Vinegar
Vic Vinegar
5 months ago

This is probably the car I most often get the desire to check the used market on, and think about making a poor financial decision. It is just one of the best looking modern designs, period. I think I’d just sit in my garage and stare at it for the first six months.

Nsane In The MembraNe
Nsane In The MembraNe
5 months ago

I absolutely love the F Type for no logical reason whatsoever. It’s just one of those super emotional cars, and little did we know 10 years ago when it was launched that stuff like this wouldn’t really be around anymore by the end of its run. It’s a fussy, unreliable, impractical car that’s probably a huge pain in the ass to own.

But just LOOK at it! It’s absolutely stunning. Listen to it! Even the “base” V6 is a symphony for the senses. Hit a backroad and let the ample booty break free. It’s not a rational choice at all, it’s a choice you make because it feels good. A salad is healthier and more sensible, but sometimes you just want to have a big juicy burger and not worry about the consequences.

It’s a bit of a shame that there are so few manuals out there, because this car is absolutely screaming for a stick. But it’s not like the auto is a slusher…it’s a ZF8, which may very well be the best automatic ever made. You’ll still have a rip roaring good time with it. Ugh…I’m gonna go look at listings for these now. I’d love to own one someday.

Bongo Friendee Harvey Park
Bongo Friendee Harvey Park
5 months ago

> let the ample booty break free

I did that a few times and I was told to leave the restaurant.

Andrew Vance
Andrew Vance
5 months ago

I’ve always wanted to LS swap one of these. Probably terrible in practice but great in theory.

Parker Kligerman
Parker Kligerman
5 months ago

Having owned one for three years (2014 V8 s) my immediate answer was yes. But like an old relationship I started to remember some of the issues.

The V8 s (I know they stopped making them) was one of the most dangerous cars I’ve ever driven on cold tires, in the rain, or generally from 2nd-3rd gear. I called it the “modern day cobra” because it was so diabolical and could light up the rears at any time.

Later on I drove a v6 and realized I made a big mistake. But for all its faults and attempted murder, I loved it dearly.

They are not perfect and definitely fit the label of a “jaaagg” but they are a car that you can’t help but feel affection for.

Bongo Friendee Harvey Park
Bongo Friendee Harvey Park
5 months ago

If the V8 scared someone like you, I wonder how civilians fare driving those.

Widgetsltd
Widgetsltd
5 months ago

The blank cylinders on the 3.0L V6 are the rear two, not the front two.

Mr Sarcastic
Mr Sarcastic
5 months ago

Why can’t these over 100 years old car companies design and build cars that are as beautiful as Jags a d reliable as Toyotas? I mean plastic anything under the hood? I know better than that. Unlubricated moving parts? Duh. Overly complicated design, hard to reach parts with the latest untested technology? Hey Nigel let’s hop over to the pub, drink a gallon of warm beer and then come back and finish designing this 12 valve plastic Turbo we want to place inside the engine block and weld closed.

Huja Shaw
Huja Shaw
5 months ago
Reply to  Mr Sarcastic

In the late 1980’s Rover tried to meld the best of two worlds with the Sterling . . . https://japanesenostalgiccar.com/video-a-british-built-acura-legend-just-wasnt-the-same/

Mr Sarcastic
Mr Sarcastic
5 months ago
Reply to  Huja Shaw

Thanks, is it wrong that I read your user name and want to respond Ghostbusters?

Kyree
Kyree
5 months ago
Reply to  Huja Shaw

And they fucked even that up, as the Rover and Honda cars weren’t as similar as you’d think.

What I find particularly funny about the arrangement was that Honda allowed Rover to build the UK-market Honda Legends, as a show of faith…but then used its own off-site facility in Swindon to correct all the issues the British-assembled cars had. They were like, “Yeah, that’s cool, but we’re gonna make sure y’all did it right.”

Mechjaz
Mechjaz
5 months ago
Reply to  Mr Sarcastic

I *just* had a fine, high dudgeon up about motorizing every damn thing and here’s 7 year old luxury sports car showing up to prove me right. Sigh.

Luke8512
Luke8512
5 months ago

What? Ford still makes the Edge?

VanGuy
VanGuy
5 months ago
Reply to  Luke8512

That surprised me, too. Although now that I think about it, I think the EcoSport is the one they’re discontinuing (in the U.S.).

But I do think they have too many SUVs available. When the size differences are negligible, why offer two? (Also talking to Toyota and probably everyone else, but I digress.)

Alexk98
Alexk98
5 months ago

What I’m hearing is the manual transmission V6 cars share a block casting with the V8 cars, meaning the V8 from the R should just bolt right up. It’s a good thing I can’t afford cars like these quite yet, otherwise I’d be bankrupt and upside down in a ditch somewhere

Mr Sarcastic
Mr Sarcastic
5 months ago
Reply to  Alexk98

Well it’s all in the planning. Do a low down payment and long term loan and kill yourself before the payments get too onerous or beit breaks.
Sounds like a plan Stan. This was meant in Jest.

Kyree
Kyree
5 months ago
Reply to  Alexk98

It’s quite possible–probable even–that the manual transmission from the V6 can’t handle the torque of the V8, which was supercharged and made a minimum of 470 HP in the F-TYPE. So, even if you could find the money, time and expertise to make that retrofit work, it would likely be a very short-term arrangement.

Kyree
Kyree
5 months ago

I am, at this point, extremely familiar with the J/LR AJ-V8 family (and its derivatives), and I recently just purchased a 2015 LR4 HSE Lux with the supercharged V6. It’s at my Land Rover specialist now, and fortunately, it has already received the updated one-piece coolant crossover pipes, and has no leaks there. (It does have a small leak on the throttle-body plate coolant line, which they are fixing).

As for the timing chain issue, it seems to be exceedingly rare on post-2013 vehicles (with either the V6 or V8), so I wouldn’t worry about that, especially if the oil changes were done frequently enough.

As for the F-TYPE itself, my research tells me that it is an evolution of the X150 (2007-2015) XK’s platform, which itself was based on that of the X350 (aluminum/retro; 2004-2009) XJ. That car, which I wrote a deep-dive on here, began development in the mid-90s. So some of the engineering is quite old, in typical Jaguar fashion. But it’s a gorgeous car.

One issue I have with the F-TYPE is that it, sadly, was never available with adaptive cruise.

But it’s an instant classic. I’d buy one. That said, the 987.2 Cayman/Boxster you mentioned is also a good idea, and will hold its resale value a bit better.

Thebloody_shitposter
Thebloody_shitposter
5 months ago
Reply to  Kyree

Which is funny because my 2007 XKR has it (they were offered as an option, the system is pretty good but it won’t hold the car at a stop and will ding at you to take over), granted it’s a $3500 raytheon radar unit so if it ever shits the bed. That’s gonna be spensive to fix…

Chuckles “haha I’m in danger” – my wallet.

Kyree
Kyree
5 months ago

I happen to have one of those spare radars sitting around. Mine is from a 2010 L322 Range Rover Supercharged and may need to be re-flashed to work in a 2007 X150 XKR, but it’s the same unit.

Mechjaz
Mechjaz
5 months ago
Reply to  Kyree

Genuine question: why does a throttle body need a coolant line? I’ve replaced the one in the 03 Z4 and took the one out of the 04 Sentra and neither had any kind of liquid plumbing whatsoever. I believe you when you say it but is that A Thing?

Kyree
Kyree
5 months ago
Reply to  Mechjaz

It’s actually used for heating, not cooling. The hot side of the coolant circuit passes through the throttle body plate to heat up the throttle body and keep it from freezing in cold weather.

I’ve seen quite a few cars with this, including Mk.5 Volkswagen GTIs and R32s, fourth-gen GM F-bodies, and even 90s Acura Integras.

Sensual Bugling Elk
Sensual Bugling Elk
5 months ago
Reply to  Kyree

In proper Swedish fashion, every Saab 9-5 dating back to 1998 has this setup. Which means my fleet’s throttle bodies run the full spectrum from flap on a string to $600 electromechanical, actively temperature controlled monstrosity.

Last edited 5 months ago by Sensual Bugling Elk
Kyree
Kyree
5 months ago

That, I did not know!

32
0
Would love your thoughts, please comment.x
()
x