Home » The 2023 Honda Accord Starts At $775 More Than The Old One But There’s A Catch

The 2023 Honda Accord Starts At $775 More Than The Old One But There’s A Catch

2023 Honda Accord

At first glance, the new 2023 Honda Accord looks great. It features pleasantly conservative styling, has a smart interior, and the new available hybrid powertrain offers improved power and efficiency. However, Honda’s aggressive price hikes for new models like the 2023 CR-V resulted in some mild trepidation around the Accord’s affordability. Well, pricing for the 2023 Honda Accord is now out and it seems like Honda isn’t moving the bar terribly far. However, some sacrifices have been made to keep pricing on the level. Let’s compare pricing and features on the new Accord to last year’s model and see if the new one seems worth it on paper.

In case you’ve purged what the 2022 Honda Accord looks like from your mind in favor of more immediately useful information like the oil pan drain plug torque spec on your daily driver or that new ridiculously complex password your workplace’s IT department gave you, here’s a brief reminder:

009 2021 Honda Accord Hybrid

Pretty handsome, right? Sure, the chrome monobrow and massive grille date the front end a touch, but the long wheelbase, sloped roofline, and sharp character lines cut a great profile. There’s nothing hugely offensive about the outgoing Accord’s styling, plus there’s plenty to like.

017 2021 Honda Accord Hybrid

The interior’s pretty good too. Material selection is great, the lid for the center stack compartment is nicely-damped, piano black is kept to a minimum, and every button is wonderfully clicky. The cabin of the old Accord has such a sense of quality to it. Plus, the ergonomics are brilliant. Everything has a real button or knob, all the controls are within easy reach, and the driving position is pleasingly low with plenty of steering column and seat adjustment. Right, refresher over, time to compare old to new.

2023 Honda Accord.

First, a disclaimer: All new Accord models are subject to a relatively reasonable $1,095 freight and PDI charge, and we’ll be including this in pricing because it’s not a fee you can get out of.

Let’s start with the important stuff – the affordable trims. The base Accord LX starts at $28,390 including freight, just $775 more than the outgoing Accord LX. Mind you, the new Accord LX seems to be at a disadvantage to the old one when it comes to equipment. The new infotainment system features a seven-inch screen rather than the old car’s eight-inch screen, dual-zone automatic climate control is no longer on the base trim, but the new car gets an all-digital gauge cluster and a horsepower peak 500 RPM higher in the rev range. Peak output of the 1.5-liter turbocharged engine is unchanged at 192 horsepower and 192 lb.-ft. of torque, but fuel economy is down one mpg across the board.

If you want more than just the basics in a new Accord, you’ll need to pony up $30,705 for the EX trim which doesn’t have a true analog on the outgoing car. The EX model adds an eight-speaker audio system, heated seats, dual-zone climate control, and a moonroof. I reckon this is the value pick of the range as it gives you all the toys you could reasonably want at a very sensible price. Sure, it may cost $630 more than the outgoing car’s Sport trim and not come with flashy 19-inch alloy wheels or a leather-wrapped steering wheel, but heated seats are a wonderful bonus and 225/50R17 tires are a whole lot cheaper to replace than 235/40R19 tires, so you should close than $630 gap on tires alone if you keep your Accord long enough.

01 2023 Honda Accord

 

If you’re looking for the big fuel economy savings of a hybrid powertrain, the new Accord starts to get pricey. The base hybrid trim is gone for 2023, with the Sport trim serving as the new gateway to electrification. Ringing up at $32,990, it’s $825 more than last year’s Hybrid Sport trim and a whopping $2,915 more than last year’s standard Sport trim, but comes with some extra goodies. Not only is power and torque up two horsepower and 15 lb.-ft. over the old hybrid model, the cabin gets a 12.3-inch touchscreen infotainment system that looks pretty slick. That seems well worth the $825 price increase, although it’s worth noting that the gas-only Sport trim is no more. Oh, and the Sport trim still gets all manner of cosmetic bits like 19-inch alloy wheels, a leather-wrapped steering wheel and shift knob, black mirror caps, and a black rear spoiler, for all your posing needs.

Moving up the range, the 2023 Accord EX-L starts at $34,635, $500 less than last year’s EX-L Hybrid model but $700 more than last year’s standard EX-L model. So how much does the new EX-L lose for it to gain hybrid power for just $700? Well, wireless charging is no longer on the menu and there’s no indication that the new car gets last year’s 450-watt 10-speaker stereo, but that appears to be about as far as the decontenting goes. You still get heated leather seats, front and rear parking sensors, second-row USB charging ports, and all the luxury-oriented toys of the Sport trim, so the EX-L seems like it offers great value.

02 2023 Honda Accord (1)

New for 2023 is the Sport-L trim, which combines the visual tweaks of the Sport with the leather upholstery of the EX-L, plus black rear valence trim for a little something extra. At $34,970, it may be worth the $335 premium over the EX-L trim, provided you’re willing to live with the more expensive 19-inch tires and the fuel consumption hit. Those big wheels knock economy down from 51 MPG city, 44 MPG highway, and 48 MPG combined to 46 MPG city, 41 MPG highway, and 44 MPG combined.

Finally, we reach the top of the 2023 Accord pyramid with the plush Touring trim. At $38,985, it’s $300 more than last year’s Hybrid Touring model but $955 cheaper than last year’s Touring model. However, it does come with a whole lot less power than last year’s standard Touring model. Honda’s brilliant turbocharged two-liter K20 engine is banished from the Accord lineup, leaving the new car on the back foot by 48 horsepower and 26 lb.-ft. of torque. While you may have once bought a top-trim Accord to get power and toys, the new Accord Touring is more focused on efficiency and toys. Mind you, most of the toys confined to the Touring trim are fairly useful. I’m talking about ventilated front seats, heated rear seats, wireless charging, a heads-up display, Google built into the infotainment system, and a 5G hotspot. Of course, this comes on top of everything in the EX-L trim, plus some other bits like 19-inch wheels and a 12-speaker Bose audio system.

2023 Honda Accord.

So how does the new Accord’s pricing stack up against its closest competitor, the Toyota Camry? Well, the Camry is cheaper on the low-end. A base Camry LE is $27,315 including its $1,095 freight charge, some $1,075 cheaper than an Accord LX. If you want a cheap hybrid midsize sedan and don’t care too much about toys, the gap widens even further. A Camry LE Hybrid stickers for $29,450, $3,540 cheaper than an Accord Sport. However, the current Camry dates back to the 2018 model year and trailed the outgoing Accord in refinement. Plus, once you move into the middle of the range, the Accord is neck-and-neck with the Camry on value.

Overall, the 2023 Honda Accord seems to be mostly worth its premium on paper, with one big catch. The base LX trim has been decontented with two very noticeable alterations being the removal of dual-zone climate control and the use of a smaller infotainment screen. It should go without saying, big decisions like that can really affect how nice a car feels. If you have a hard budget cap of $30,000 and want a midsize sedan, your money should go further by either picking up a leftover 2022 Accord or shopping elsewhere. However, excluding the LX trim, the new Accord looks decent on paper. An updated design with plenty of hybrid trims for not a whole lot more than comparably-equipped examples of the outgoing car seems like a good thing overall. Of course, cars aren’t driven on paper so I’ll wait until I’m behind the wheel to reach a final verdict, but unless you want that torquey two-liter turbo motor in your life or are dead-set on keeping things cheap, don’t rush out to buy a 2022 Accord just yet.

(Photo credits: Honda)

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32 Responses

  1. I do still find it interesting that they kept the LX trim on this model, and brought the EX back – but with no regular gas Sport, which was popular in the current gen.

    A 2023 Civic EX sedan with the 1.5T is equipped pretty close the Accord LX. But it could be that Honda drops the LX Accord in 2024 and this was just to mitigate headlines on price increases, because that would have been a $3k increase in base MSRP if they dropped it from the start as they did with the new CR-V.

    No base Hybrid might make some sense if a Civic Hybrid does come to our market, that would surely slide in under $30k.

    1. The 1.5T is an engine to avoid, particularly if you live in cold climates. All kinds of oil dilution issues leading to engine failure, which Honda blamed on the owners.

      1. My LAST Honda was a 2012 Accord exl

        – Engine Seizure!

        I had the air-bag recall done about 5 years ago. None of the air-bags deployed when the 2012 exl hit a telephone pole at 20 mph and broke the telephone pole in half!!! Beware!!!!!!!

        I finally found out about the class action lawsuit for the excessive oil consumption yesterday (1 Qt per 1,000 miles), 2 years after the engine sezure. I spoke with honda headquarters (1919 torrance blvd, torrance, ca 90501) today for an hour and a half. mostly on hold waiting for Alma to get her stupervisor Markita to come to the phone.

        Their telephone computer recognized my phone number even though I had never called before and knew I had a 2012 exl, but Alma acted like she didn’t know anything… she asked me for my VIN number, but when I took a minute to find it, and asked why the computer knew it so why can’t you look at your computer she said the last four digits would do. She wasn’t aware of any class action lawsuit for the excessive oil consumption, but later said my vin number was not included.

        I explained in detail to both of them how the $7,000 engine replacement and the three months of not having my exl and all the time I had to spend trying to get any help probably cost me somewhere around $100,000. I explained that I had 5 hondas previous to this 2012 that I had driven to the moon and back (350,000 miles), and I would buy another honda if they would help with my $7,000 cost of the engine replacement, but they adimately expressed to me that they would not take any responsibility for the engine sezure, or the faulty airbags!

        After hanging up with Markita, I looked up and found the guys phone number who was the main person involved with the “Honda Motor Excessive Oil Consumption Class Action Lawsuit” in California. I called his cell phone and he was very nice, but explained that all he got from all the time and effort was $500, free oil changes, and spark plugs as long as he owned the Honda. He had given it to his parents, and bought a Tesla. Not with the $500 of course… SMH

        Their phone number is:

        1 (800) 999-1009

        If you want to get the run-around yourself!

        Todd Faircloth
        Macon, GA

      2. I’ve heard of the oil dilution issue. I mentioned the 1.5T as the Civic EX with that powertrain is priced very close to the Accord LX, much closer than seems to be the norm for new Hondas in bordering size classes. Ex: the HR-V tops out well under where a CR-V now begins.

    2. Also, I feel like there’s more likely an ‘exchange’ of equipment than decontenting, sort of tit-for-tat. The standard audio display is down an inch, but the digital instrument cluster is 10.2″ and Honda’s website says the current one is 7″. Climate control goes single zone on 2023 LX, but headlights might be full LED vs. low-beam only LED on the 2022 LX.

      Seating seems to be one area Honda is decontenting – CR-V and Accord had 4-way lumbar adjust and dropped to 2-way on the 2023 models. Plus Civic Si dropping heated seats.

  2. I want to like the new accord, but I just feel meh. I wanted a 2018 when I was shopping for a new/used car in 2019, but couldn’t find a 2.0/M6 anywhere. Now I wouldn’t give up the 3.5 2017 I have for a new one. Seems like less content than even an older one.

  3. Too much money. Last new sedan I bought was a 2016 Nissan Altima 3.5 SR for $21,895. Sure, it was lot poison, but I’m not okay with paying more than $26K for a sedan.

  4. Still not too happy about the looks and losing the 2.0 turbo. But I guess it’s going back to the dependable roots. Though I am glad that it still exists and that someone will buy it I guess.

  5. Cutting the 2.0L turbo from the top level is Honda’s way of saying they don’t want the Accord Touring to poach on the sales of the Acura TLX. You want the power? Head to the Acura dealer.

    1. Does Acura still sell cars? I stopped watching Acura years ago when they went with the acronym model names and the ugly beak styling. It’s a shame because one of my favorite cars of all time was my wife’s Integra.

  6. The previous generation was way better looking… or at least more interesting to look at. Though the long dead 2.0L Sport with a manual was the only spec I would have considered, realistically. Yawn.

    1. 3 model years isn’t really “long dead.” That means the 3 year leases are just coming to market, although it’s likely a lot of buyouts are happening as there isn’t a comparable replacement.

    2. Yeah if you had to choose who to go on a blind date with would you date the girl described as interesting looking or better looking? Or choose the sex of your choice with those descriptors?

  7. Ah, the “we’re not making enough money, so decontent the car” strategy. Dumber-Chrysler was very successful with doing that on their c-hang on.
    Wait.
    I’ve just been informed that immediately after decontenting, sales on every affected vehicle instantly collapsed because consumers instantly recognized that they were getting screwed. And promptly told Dumber-Chrysler to fuck off.

    1. This, or the classic “we don’t really expect to sell this but need to hit the price point.” VW did that when I worked there when they released the 2010 (or 2011?) Jetta. The Jetta S had no AC and no radio. The wiring and speakers were there, and you could by the $600+ head unit, but it wasn’t included. It was a super decontented version that they admitted (internally) was to show up in Edmunds search results when someone set the limit to $15k. No one would actually buy it, but it got them in search results and, presumably, some people in the door for upsells.

  8. Sad to see the manual gone, as usual. But I really like the styling direction Honda are taking. The previous unibrow look worked the best on the Accord, and decently on a few other models. But this new styling is so clean and crisp that I think it will age as well as the boxy, simple economy car designs from the 70s and 80s. Lines and simplicity will age far more gracefully than curves and complexity, both of which are very subject to current trends and can become an eyesore or overly representative of a time period

    1. IMO, the best is curves and simplicity. Note cars like the Ferrari 250GTO, Jaguar E-Type, Citroen DS, Alfa Romeo Tipo 33 Stradale, Jaguar Mark II, Mercedes Benz 300SL Gullwing, ect. Ageless beauty, more than half a century later. Curves and simplicity also lends themselves well to some absurd levels of aero slipperiness, not just aesthetic beauty. The cars mentioned above could all be tweaked to have greatly less drag while looking similar to the way they do.

      But that’s not good for planned obsolescence… so instead, keep that sort of design away from affordability for the masses whenever is appears in a product by only allowing it for rare/”exclusive” cars that rich people are going to snap up and never drive, and instead keep recycling various baroque fads while making each successive generation of vehicle fatter, heavier, more feature-laden, more angular, angrier-looking, less engaging to drive, and most of all, more *profitable*…

  9. Too bad decontenting didn’t mean replace the CVT with a manual transmission 😛

    Automatic climate control had been standard on every Accord since 2013!

    Bring back the DX model with black door handles and manual windows LOL

  10. I really don’t get the fetish for dual zone climate control. Maybe understandable in a large three row vehicle where it can provide comfort way back. But these sedan systems, especially when they are left/right, are just a dumb gimmick. So two people can’t find a reasonable setting to share? Go cry on your avocado toast. Most people’s homes have only one thermostat. Must be like living in the third world (not a comment on US politics).

    Same thing with touch screen size. Does it really matter that much? Nah.

    And I’ll definitely take 17″ wheels over 19″ any day. Even 16″ will do.

    This is all just brochure fodder to get envy marketing going. “You mean you bought the base model? But you could of had this cool trinket for only $900 more, or $7.50 over 10 years.”

    1. Millenial baiting aside, the problem I’ve heard about with the dual zone climate systems is that if you have significantly different temperatures set you just end up with a sweaty head and freezing feet because air doesn’t respect boundaries between seats.

  11. IMHO
    1. If you include the destination fee for this year include the one from last year.
    2. If you compare prices you need to include the inflation tax. Not usually an issue on one year but goberment really screwed us to about 8%. Meaning this year is probably cheaper.
    3. It would be nice, not sure how it could be done, if we could weight different options.
    4. Now is an infotainment screen size measured like a TV? Diagonally? 1 inch diagonal is nothing but leaving it out is biased testing.

  12. The removal of dual-zone climate control and a slightly smaller infotainment screen wouldn’t stop me from buying an Accord. What would/does stop me is the lack of a manual, the lack of a hatchback or wagon body and the lack of a hybrid being available in base trim. Oh and if there was a lack of USB ports, that would be a big negative as well.

    The base LX has all the features I’d want and more. I don’t need heated seats (I actually dislike heated seats), don’t need a multi-zone HVAC system, I don’t need a lot of stuff that comes standard in cars these days. And even the base model has way more power than I need. I’d be happy to sacrifice some power for better fuel economy.

    So from that perspective, I want a car that is a manual. If I must get an automatic, then I want it to be a good hybrid… but in a base trim

    What I DO need is a vehicle that has decent space and headroom in the back seat, decent truck space with a big trunk opening so bulky items will fit, good reliability and low operating costs.

    So basically I won’t be buying an Accord for reasons that have nothing to do with unnecessary fluff features.

    But if they come out with a Honda Civic hatch with a hybrid powertrain, that would be something I’d consider (along with a base model with the manual)

    However, the current gen non-hybrid base Civic hatch has some pretty optimistic pricing. When comparing it to a Prius, the Prius costs only about $600 more in Canada after tax and gets substantially better fuel economy.

    The extra performance the Civic has doesn’t add any real value since the Prius is already good enough in terms of performance for a daily driver.

  13. Oh look, another journalist using “handsome” to (perhaps unintentionally) damn with faint praise. 😛

    New one looks much better than the old unibrow. Gives me a bit of a final gen Impala vibe, which I always thought was a terrific-looking sedan.

  14. I have a 2021 (same as 2022) Hybrid EX-L and can speak to some of the features.
    The wireless charging is completely useless. You can Google many issues of the phone needing to be juuuust right (kinda diagonal) for it to work and the first stop/accelerate cycle, it’s out of position and won’t charge. Which means you have to plug it in, which in turn negates needing the wireless CarPlay/Android Auto.
    And the 450w speaker system is not that good. It is definitely the case that yes, it can get louder than any other car I’ve owned, but the quality of the mids and the highs are not there, even when comparing to my roommate’s 2014 Fusion.
    And as for heated seats, very important to have on the hybrid!
    When you turn the normal HVAC on, it turns on the gas motor to create heat or run the AC, which kills your city mileage.
    I don’t know the details of why they don’t have it charge the battery when it’s on to run those things(like while at a stop light), but it’s nice to just turn on the heated seats to keep the winter MPGs in the low 40s on short trips instead of the low 30s with the heat on : /

  15. My last Honda was a 2012 Accord exl – TWO WORDS — ENGINE SEIZURE!

    I had the air-bag recall done about 5 years ago. None of the air-bags deployed when the 2012 exl hit a telephone pole at 20 mph and broke the telephone pole in half!!! Beware!!!!!!!

    I finally found out about the class action lawsuit for the excessive oil consumption yesterday (1 Qt per 1,000 miles), 2 years after the engine sezure. I spoke with honda headquarters (1919 torrance blvd, torrance, ca 90501) today for an hour and a half. mostly on hold waiting for Alma to get her stupervisor Markita to come to the phone.

    Their telephone computer recognized my phone number even though I had never called before and knew I had a 2012 exl, but Alma acted like she didn’t know anything… she asked me for my VIN number, but when I took a minute to find it, and asked why the computer knew it so why can’t you look at your computer she said the last four digits would do. She wasn’t aware of any class action lawsuit for the excessive oil consumption, but later said my vin number was not included.

    I explained in detail to both of them how the $7,000 engine replacement and the three months of not having my exl and all the time I had to spend trying to get any help probably cost me somewhere around $100,000. I explained that I had 5 hondas previous to this 2012 that I had driven to the moon and back (350,000 miles), and I would buy another honda if they would help with my $7,000 cost of the engine replacement, but they adimately expressed to me that they would not take any responsibility for the engine sezure, or the faulty airbags!

    After hanging up with Markita, I looked up and found the guys phone number who was the main person involved with the “Honda Motor Excessive Oil Consumption Class Action Lawsuit” in California. I called his cell phone and he was very nice, but explained that all he got from all the time and effort was $500, free oil changes, and spark plugs as long as he owned the Honda. He had given it to his parents, and bought a Tesla. Not with the $500 of course… SMH

    Their phone number is:

    1 (800) 999-1009

    If you want to get the run-around yourself!

    Todd Faircloth
    Macon, GA

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