Home » A Man Spent Five Years Turning This Korean War Dodge M152 Military Truck Into An Epic Camper

A Man Spent Five Years Turning This Korean War Dodge M152 Military Truck Into An Epic Camper

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I attended off-road camper show Overland Expo West last week and it was chock-full of awesome overlanding rigs, some innovative technology, and inspiring programs. Among the overlanding madness were a bunch of custom-built campers and expedition vehicles, some of them even cooler than many of the factory-built rigs out there. One of them is this, a 1954 Dodge M152. This truck served in the Korean War for the Canadian Army over a half century ago. After a five-year nut-and-bolt restoration and modification, it now travels the country as an epic expedition vehicle. Don’t let the looks fool you, either, there’s some modern hardware under the vintage metal.

I’m finished with what has been the biggest press trips I’ve ever been on. Last week, Toyota flew me out to Kona, Hawai’i to review the Grand Highlander and to peek at the new Tacoma. Then, I was shipped out to Flagstaff, Arizona to take part in my very first Overland Expo West, which included a drive of a beautiful custom Lexus LX 600 overlanding build and an overlanding trailer. You’ll get to read all about my adventures over the next several days. And if you have enough money, you’ll even be able to buy that Lexus. Anyway, I have a ton to write about and I want to start with an expedition build that remains one of my highlights of Overland Expo West.

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One of the many things that make Overland Expo West fantastic is that it’s not just a place for manufacturers to sell you products. I quickly learned that DIYers are a huge part of Overland Expo and without them, the event just wouldn’t be the same. Campsites were filled with all kinds of custom rigs that I wish I had enough time to check out. I saw no fewer than seven retired ambulances turned into campers. And while I didn’t see it in the campground, I also spotted a Smart Fortwo driving around Flagstaff with chunky all-terrain tires, a lift kit, and a tent on its roof.

Outside of the camping areas, DIYers also had a place immediately within the gates of Overland Expo. A right turn after the main entrance led me into the DIY area, where I saw some glorious ideas, including a Porsche Cayenne towing half of a Porsche Boxster-turned overland trailer.

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Next to it was this Dodge M152 and like every vehicle in the DIY area, it has a story to tell.

The Army’s Post-WWII Workhorse

Dodge M37 B1 4x4 ¾ Ton Truck, Military Standard Dimensions
United States Army

This truck has been around for an incredible 69 years. Introduced in 1951, the Dodge G-741 family of three-quarter-ton trucks succeeded the WC Series used in World War II. As a brochure for a Dodge M37 indicates, these newer trucks share some ancestry with the WWII trucks, with improvements from lessons learned during the war. These trucks originally sported 24-volt sealed electrical systems, a waterproof ignition, deep water fording abilities, a synchronized transmission, a two-speed transfer case, and respectable off-roading numbers. For example, the M37 had an approach angle of up to 44 degrees and a departure angle of 32 degrees.

There were a number of G-741 variants from the M37 pickup to the M42 command truck, M43 ambulance, V126 radar truck, and even the XM142 bomb service truck. These trucks were built until 1968 when the military began replacing them with Kaiser Jeep M715 trucks. Over 100,000 of these were made, and one rare variant is the M152.

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I spoke with Glenn Saber, the owner of this grand truck, and he told me that the M152 is a utility truck derived from the M43 ambulance variant. The Dodge M152 found use in the Canadian Army as a communications and radio truck in the Korean War. That’s the origin of Saber’s 1954 M152. This truck is serial 3458 and was built at Windsor Assembly for the Canadian Army. It’s believed that there were somewhere around 1,000 of these built and enthusiasts know of about eight or so survivors.

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United State Army

Those numbers make the Dodge M152 worthy of a Holy Grail nomination. Less impressive is what the M152 and its brethren had under their hoods. Sure, these trucks had a 60 percent gradeability and could tow up to 6,000 pounds, but top speed was a leisurely 50 mph. Under the hood sat a 230 cubic inch Dodge T-245 L-head six making 78 HP. Later models saw a power bump to 94 HP and 188 lb-ft torque, while Canadian versions got a 250.6 cubic inch six making 95 HP. No matter the version, these trucks weren’t built for speed, but off-roading prowess and utility. And remember, I said that was the top speed, not cruising speed.

This 1954 Dodge M152

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Saber told me that engine swaps for these mil-spec trucks are common. A popular engine of choice is the Cummins 4BT. Going with a 4BT offers, at minimum, a modest performance upgrade. The 4BT is an inline-four diesel making 105 HP and 265 lb-ft torque, but can be found in higher power variants. A common 4BT configuration is 170 HP and 420 lb-ft torque, more than enough grunt to make a 70-year-old military truck capable for today’s roads.

Despite the popularity, when Saber restored this M152, he didn’t go with a 4BT. In fact, he didn’t go with Cummins, Power Stroke, or Duramax power. Under the hood of his M152 resides a 3.9-liter Isuzu 4BD2-T diesel engine. I didn’t get a chance to see this powerplant, but here’s what it looks like:

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Rudy’s Diesel Engine Parts

 

Saber says he got it from a 1996 Isuzu NPR and in this configuration, it’s making 150 HP and 325 lb-ft torque. From the factory, the Dodge G-741 trucks got single-digit fuel economy while loaded. This refreshed truck? It gets between 17 mpg and 23 mpg while cruising 65 mph all day long. Saber tells me its new top speed is about 80 mph, a notable upgrade from stock. It could cruise higher, but Saber keeps it around 65 mph to keep exhaust gas temperatures down.

But why did he go with an Isuzu engine? Saber gave me two reasons. He told me that wrecked Isuzu NPRs show up on auctions all of the time. Since everyone wants to drop a Cummins into their build and old wrecked trucks aren’t worth much to begin with, those NPRs sell for peanuts, cheaper than a Cummins 4BT. Price alone would be a good enough deciding factor, but Saber tells me that in his experience, the Isuzu engines are smoother, quieter, and not nearly as harsh as the baby Cummins. I dig it; Saber could have just dropped a Cummins or LS in there but he went with a different route.

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Different is how I’d describe much about this build. Saber worked with another man, Larry Messing, to perform a nut-and-bolt restoration and modification to this truck. It took them five years of work to get to what you see here. There’s a lot of detail that you might not see immediately. The truck has a four-inch diameter exhaust stack, but it’s mounted with rubber to reduce noise and vibration. That roof rack is also a custom piece, and Saber went through the work to make sure the pattern of the mesh on the roof rack matches the original window covers.

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Not As Rough As It Looks

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Going back to the mention of the rubber-mounted exhaust stack for a moment, comfort is a recurring theme with this M152. The cab sports an aftermarket air-conditioner and heating system while the seats come from a Chevy HHR. The power seat functions have apparently been retained.

The comfort goals are perhaps better illustrated with the camper portion of the M152. The box where the communications equipment once was is now a cozy camper. Inside, there’s a memory foam sofa that turns into a full-size bed or folds up entirely to fit a motorcycle.

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Beside that is a full kitchen, featuring a stove, oven, refrigerator, sink, and a surface that can be used a dining table or desk. In terms of tanks, the truck can hold 24.5 gallons of fresh water, 3.5 gallons in its gray tank, and 1.5 gallons in its cassette toilet.

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Saber didn’t just toss a bed in the back of a truck, either. The box is lined with R6 polystyrene insulation and there’s a 5,000 BTU air-conditioner that can run from shore power or from the inverter. The camper can feed from 30 Amp shore power, from three 76 Ah deep-cycle batteries, or from the solar panels mounted to the roof.

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For entertainment, a flat-screen television folds down from the walls, or Saber could just pull out his HO-scale train set. Have you ever heard of an RV with its own train set? Saber likes trains enough that he sourced K3LA train horns.

Of course, this is an overlanding event, and Saber’s truck seemed prepared enough. The front axle is a Dana 60 with 4.10 gearing and a locker. The dual rear axle is from AAM and also has 4.10 gearing, but an open differential. Saber says that a neat feature about his truck is that he can divert all power to the front wheels, all power to the rears, or put it into four-wheel-drive. Each mode also has a high and low range. Shifting is accomplished through a five-speed manual.

Honestly, this is just the beginning of the incredible list of modifications. The truck uses its original leaf springs, but they’ve been restored and they’re helped out with air bags. And that sweet rear deck? A part of it disconnects to become a bunk bed inside. Here, just take a look at the mod list:

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Saber’s mission with the M152 was to take it from coast to coast, stopping at national parks, historic monuments, and small businesses along the way. This isn’t a highway bomber, but a machine to cruise those backroads connecting rural American towns to each other. I’d say mission accomplished, and Saber’s certainly happy with it. This is a rig that turns heads and can be driven across the country without making you hate road trips. I love that you can’t even tell that there’s some modernization going on here. I hope America gets to see this Dodge cruising the streets for years to come.

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Glenn Saber
Glenn Saber
9 months ago

WOW! Just found this article on My M152 … LOL! If any questions, fire away 🙂

Ok_Im_here
Ok_Im_here
9 months ago

I have either the same or similar model of Whynter fridge/freezer inside there… I love than thing and much cheaper than the Dometics. Built really well.

If that’s bamboo flooring in there, that’s a really nice touch–makes it a very livable/homey space.

That propane stove/oven combo (I think that’s what it is.) is something a friend has, not a bad solution but it’s not ventilated I bet, so only cook with the doors/windows open!

Last edited 9 months ago by Ok_Im_here
Alasdair
Alasdair
9 months ago

I know that they didn’t technically sign a peace treaty but how did a 1954 Dodge serve in a war where the fighting finished in 1953?

Ok_Im_here
Ok_Im_here
9 months ago
Reply to  Alasdair

DMZ possibly. Or you know, 1954 made in 1953? Who knows?

C.A.R. Doctor PhD
C.A.R. Doctor PhD
9 months ago

Flown to Kona and then Flag, sounds like you really drew the short straw, Mercedes.

Great stuff as always. Just don’t let the perks and ‘regular’ stories distract you too much from the batshit stuff that we all love (well, me anyway). Somebody needs to make up for DT getting his act together.

MaximillianMeen
MaximillianMeen
9 months ago

Anyone else hear the opening notes to “Suicide is Painless” upon seeing the drawing of the M43?

BoneStock
BoneStock
9 months ago

Much respect for an innovative build on an extremely rare truck, but those HHR seats and the relatively stock suspension sounds like an innovative form of spinal torture.

Glenn Saber
Glenn Saber
9 months ago
Reply to  BoneStock

Actually, one of the best things of the M152 is its stock suspension, soft and cushy. Great cruiser. I own an HHR and the seats are super – easily 8 hour comfortable. I tried my seats in the Dodge and found the fit to be magical, so got a $100 junk yard pair and they fit like they were made for it. Electric height, tilt, lumbar with head and arm rests.

DadBod
DadBod
9 months ago

I respect the effort and the cool-car factor, but the dimestore patriotism turns it into a joke. Especially funny since he plastered all that crap on a Canadian military vehicle.

Last edited 9 months ago by DadBod
Mr Sarcastic
Mr Sarcastic
9 months ago
Reply to  DadBod

It is a Dodge.

DadBod
DadBod
9 months ago
Reply to  Mr Sarcastic

a dodge used by the canadian military:

The Dodge M152 found use in the Canadian Army as a communications and radio truck in the Korean War. That’s the origin of Saber’s 1954 M152.

Last edited 9 months ago by DadBod
Staffma
Staffma
9 months ago

I love this thing. Every once in a while, an M37 will pop up for sale near me but they are almost always too far gone due to rust. The drivetrain swap should fix the whole “too slow for public roads” issue. We used to have an Isuzu flatbed with the 3.9 engine in it at work, and while any flatbed isn’t going to be fast it was quick enough to drive on the highway at 65 all day loaded down with skids of material. Should be more than enough power for a lighter vehicle.

John Beef
John Beef
9 months ago

Geez, 17-23 MPG is about what my stock 4Runner gets. That’s really impressive.

V10omous
V10omous
9 months ago

According to the guy’s list of modifications, the Isuzu diesel is “3.9 CID”, which probably would make it quite a bit slower than the original 70 year old Dodge engine lol.

Anyways, cool truck and great writeup.

Glenn Saber
Glenn Saber
9 months ago
Reply to  V10omous

The original, heavy Dodge engine was a 6 mpg boat anchor. Top speed was 44 mph and it took 28 seconds to achieve that. Truck was nicknamed the Road Turd. Much improvement in engine design has occurred in the last 69 years. It’s still not quick at 9,500 lbs, but stays with traffic and can cruise all day at 65 mph, but on steep grades, I’m the guy with the emergency flashers on going 35 mph with a happy engine at 2,000 rpm in 3rd, EGT at 800 degrees with 18 psi boost. That turbo whistle is intoxicating.

Jesus Helicoptering Christ
Jesus Helicoptering Christ
9 months ago

I keep hearing the words “exhaust gas temperatures” in Robot Cantina’s voice.

I won’t even begin to count how many times he’s said that phrase in his most recent videos.

Douglas Lain
Douglas Lain
9 months ago

Hey Mercedes, have you ever been to the Volo Museum up north of Chicago? I went this weekend, and there’s a large(ish) display of RVs and proto-RVs, It’s worth the time (heck I drove 9 hours to get there, well, I had other business, but still…) to check out. LOTS of cool cars as well.

Arrest-me Red
Arrest-me Red
9 months ago

nice conversion, not for me, but better than a tent. Not a fan of a sh*tcase though.

Wonder what camp grounds with a 10 year rule think of this? 😛

Nic Periton
Nic Periton
9 months ago

Where is the train set? You go into great detail about engines and water tanks and mpg and you just give a fleeting mention to the most important thing. Is it analog or DCC, what era is it set in? Could it be a model of Korean railways in 1954?
I like train sets, a bit. I have one or two.

Parsko
Parsko
9 months ago
Reply to  Nic Periton

THIS!!!!!!

My brain stopped at that bullet point to post something, you beat me to it. MOAR INFO!

Glenn Saber
Glenn Saber
9 months ago
Reply to  Nic Periton

Loop of HO flex-track is tacked to the underside of the dining table, can be set up inside or out with a Smurf forest, Brio waterfall and fiber optic xmas tree stuffed into the inverted table leg socket. Train is my childhood 1960 Tyco Gandy Dancer yellow UP maintenance of way train #T608 with the 0-4-0 booster engine that can handle the tight radius. That train kick-started my lifelong obsession with the hobby and has earned the right to travel with me. HO is DC, so only needed a speed control plugged into a 12v accessory outlet. Crowd pleaser!

Jakob K's Garage
Jakob K's Garage
9 months ago

You can turn anything you like into a camper. This guy obviously likes old cramped military vehicles.

Saw a guy on YouTube who made a Citroën 2CV camper. Same result: Owner loves it, everybody else shake their heads.

You could probably make a Smart (4-2) camper as well… If I can think it, I bet it has been done somewhere.

Jakob K's Garage
Jakob K's Garage
9 months ago

Oh shit, you wrote about a Smart camper already last year..
It was just the silliest I could think of.
No offense towards Smarts, they’re cool and fun cars 😎

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