Home » Studebaker K10 Tow Truck, Lancia Hyena Zagato, Harley-Davidson XR1200: Mercedes’ Marketplace Madness

Studebaker K10 Tow Truck, Lancia Hyena Zagato, Harley-Davidson XR1200: Mercedes’ Marketplace Madness

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Welcome back to Mercedes’ Marketplace Madness! As you know, I love picking up dirt-cheap cars and motorcycles and then telling you lovely readers about the dumb things that I do with them. Since I’m shopping all of the time, I always have an evolving list of vehicles I want to buy. Here’s what I’ve been obsessed with lately.

I missed last week thanks to a pair of press trips. That means I’ve been sitting on cars and motorcycles that make me drool for a week. Many of them sold, only to get replaced with other fun vehicles. There are many cars on this list that I would buy, but thankfully I do not have the money for them. Whew.

Here’s what I’m looking at this week!

2002 Toyota Mark II Blit 2.5iR-V – $9,902

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Facebook Seller

This lovely wagon is some forbidden fruit for our readers based in the United States thanks to the 25 year import rule. But if you’re in Canada (or know a particularly crafty importer), then this sleek long roof can be yours! Here’s how Toyota describes what you’re looking at:

The Mark II Blit was released in January 2002 as a successor to the Mark II wagon Qualis. While the Qualis was based on the front-engine, front-wheel-drive platform of the Camry Gracia, the Blit reverted to the front-engine, rear-wheel-drive (FR) layout by adopting the platform of the ninth-generation Mark II sedan (released in October 2000).

The Blit station wagon could accommodate five people, and its body was 40 mm longer than that of the sedan. It shared the four 6-cylinder engines with the Mark II sedan. The drivetrain layout was either FR or electronically controlled full-time 4-wheel-drive (i-Four), and the transmission was a 4-speed ECT-i or a 5-speed Super ECT. The suspension employed a 4-wheel double wishbone arrangement, with self-leveling shock absorbers for the rear.

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Facebook Seller

Production of the Blit was discontinued in June 2007. The various meanings of “Mark” are the same as in English (target, grade, fame). “Corona Mark II” can be taken to mean that the car is both “the second-generation model” and “an upgraded version” of the Corona. “Blit” comes from “Blitz,” which means “lightning” in German.

This particular Mark II Blit is a 2.5iR-V, which comes with a 1JZ-GTE 2.5-liter straight six making a claimed 276 HP and 278 lb-ft torque. It’s paired with an automatic transmission delivering power to the rear wheels. This 2002 Toyota Mark II Blit 2.5iR-V can be had for $13,500 CAD (about $9,902 USD) from the seller in Orillia, Ontario with 205,000 kilometers (about 127,381 miles).

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1974 Jensen Interceptor – $39,999

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Facebook Seller

Here’s a striking British car housing American firepower under its hood, or perhaps bonnet, in this context. The Interceptor was arguably the most famous vehicle to roll out of Jensen Motors. The UK’s National Motor Museum gives a brief history:

Specialist car builder Jensen created a sensation when they launched the Interceptor at the 1966 London Motor Show. The aggressively styled car with body built by Vignale of Turin was powered by a potent Chrysler V8 engine. Other than a few with manual gearboxes, most were equipped with Chrysler’s Torqueflite automatic transmission. The Jensen Interceptor, and its four-wheel drive derivative the FF, were aimed at the luxury car market.

From the 1930s, Jensen Motors supplied car bodies for many of the larger manufacturers as well as building a range of commercial vehicle chassis. In the 1950s and 1960s the company established a reputation as a builder of sporty GT cars such as the 541 and C-V8. The Interceptor built on this tradition. Jensen survived until 1976, eventually succumbing to financial difficulties in the aftermath of the oil crisis.

Not noted in that brief is the fact that Jensen was technically revived a number of times afterward. Jensen Special Products (JSP) and Jensen Parts & Service Limited (JPS) rose from the ashes of Jensen’s death. JSP was built from the development team of Jensen and provided specialist engineering services. Meanwhile, JPS was initially formed to service existing Jensens before later becoming International Motors. The latter company imported Hyundais, Maseratis, and Subarus. In 1983, employee Ian Orford would purchase JPS and attempted to restart Interceptor production, reportedly churning out just 14 Interceptor S4s before ceasing production in 1992.

Jensen was revived again in 2001 with the Jensen S-V8, another car that was made in just a handful before ceasing production in 2002. Since then, the Jensen name keeps coming back, but without bearing fruit.

Back to the car, the Interceptor brought some change to Jensen. The company had been building cars with fiberglass bodies and the Interceptor was a return to steel. This Interceptor is a Mark II, which comes with some cosmetic revisions over previous versions. Power comes from a 440 cubic inch Chrysler RB big-block V8. This was good for 330 HP gross, or about 250 HP net. The seller says that this 440 is original, as is the TorqueFlite 727 automatic that it’s bolted to. This car was restored about 20 years ago. It’s $39,999 from the seller in Tustin, California with about 102,500 miles.

2009 Harley-Davidson XR1200 – $6,500

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Facebook Seller

In a case of bad timing, Harley-Davidson correctly predicted today’s popularity of flat-track racer-inspired motorcycles but came to market with one a decade too soon. For the 2008 model year, the Motor Company released the XR1200. The motorcycle was really a hopped-up Sportster, but it was better than any other Sporty on sale at the time.

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Saddled in the frame is Harley’s 1202cc Evolution V-twin making 91 HP and 73.8 lb-ft torque. As Motorcyclist Magazine wrote, that made the XR1200 20 HP more powerful than the Motor Company’s next best. Even better, the XR1200 was known for having its handling, a rarity from Harley-Davidson in those days. The Motorcyclist review also noted that this engine is smoother and less noisy than in the other Sportsters. In other words, the XR1200 was one of those rare 2000s occasions when Harley made a bike outside of its then-usual fare.

Reviewers loved the XR1200, but found it perplexing that Harley took a long time to build a replica of its race-winning machines. Though, perhaps the most bewildering thing of all is the fact that Harley built replicas of American race machines, then sold them in Europe first. Unfortunately, as our friends at RideApart note, it wasn’t a success and was killed off in 2013.

Today, XR1200s still fly under the radar, enjoying relatively low prices for a modern Harley-Davidson. Even in these times of inflated prices, you can get an XR1200 like this one today for just $6,500. This one is located in Smyrna, Tennessee with 25,000 miles.

1991 Eagle Talon TSi – $23,000

1991 Eagle Talon Import Classics
Autotrader Seller

Some car enthusiasts are reaching the point in their careers where they can finally afford good versions of the cars they loved as kids. I remember racing Eagle Talons in racing games and being fascinated with the car’s relationship with Mitsubishi. Sadly, if you’re just getting the kind of money to afford your childhood cars now, you’ll often find them with high mileage and worn out. So many of these Eagle Talons are like that.

Well, here’s an opportunity to pick up an Eagle Talon TSi that’s about as close to brand new as you’re likely to find in a while. This 1991 Eagle Talon TSi has just 26,000 original miles and hasn’t been subject to the modifications that so many Talon owners have done to their cars. In other words, this car is a time capsule and the owner even claims that it still has new car smell.

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The Talon was a product of the famous Diamond-Star Motors. In 1982, Chrysler was slinging some 110,000 Mitsubishi-based cars onto the American market, convincing Mitsubishi to cut out the middleman and just sell its own cars. A roadblock faced by Mitsubishi was a voluntary importation quota that restricted the number of vehicles Japanese automakers could bring over.

Chrysler and Mitsubishi got around this by joining forces in creating Diamond-Star Motors in 1985. In 1988, DSM’s Normal, Illinois plant (now the home of Rivian) came online. The joint venture first produced a trio of sporty coupes: The Mitsubishi Eclipse, Plymouth Laser, and Eagle Talon. These new cars (the Talon released in 1989 for the 1990 model year) shared a platform and were mechanically identical.

The Talon TSi represented the top of the range. Power comes from a 2.0-liter 4G63T turbo four. In AWD variants it’s making 195 HP. Here, in this FWD version, it’s making 190 HP and 203 lb-ft torque. That power goes through a manual transmission. The price for this one seems high at $23,000, but it’s wonderful to see one of these in such good condition. This Talon can be found for sale on Autotrader by the seller in Aitkin, Minnesota.

1966 Chrysler Imperial ‘Black Beauty’ Stunt Car – Inquire

1966 Chrysler Imperial Black Bea
Ideal Classic Cars

Do you like the movie The Green Hornet? I’m talking about the 2011 movie starring Seth Rogen and Jay Chou, not the mid-1960s TV series. Or at the very least, do you like the sweet Chrysler Imperial from the movie called the ‘Black Beauty?’ Well, you can buy what’s being claimed to be a screen-used stunt car from the movie.

According to Carscoops, Dennis McCarthy of Vehicle Effects (also the vehicle builder for the Fast & Furious franchise since Tokyo Drift) built 29 copies of the Black Beauty. These vehicles featured prop machine guns, rocket launchers, and flamethrowers. Of course, the cars also had heavy tint, custom interiors, and green lights. Most of the 29 cars were destroyed, with one or two reported to survive. The New York Times wrote about how most of the cars were built and some weren’t functional while some were built just to be destroyed.

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1966 Chrysler Imperial Black Bea (1)
Ideal Classic Cars

It’s unclear if this car is the same one that was given away in a promotion with Sony Pictures and CKE Restaurants. What I can tell you is back in 2017, that car sold at Barrett-Jackson auction for just $29,700, a seemingly cheap figure for a movie’s hero car. I will warn you that there are replicas out there as well, so definitely ask the dealer for some proof of authenticity.

Power in this example comes from Chevrolet 454 cubic inch V8. If it’s a legitimate stunt car build, it should be making 500 HP and transmitting it through an Art Carr Turbo 400 transmission and a Ford 9-inch differential. This example is being sold by Ideal Classic Cars in Venice, Florida. Again, I’d recommend getting some confirmation that it’s real.

1963 Plymouth Sport Fury – $26,300

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Hemmings Seller

As Motor Trend writes, when Plymouth was introduced in 1928, the vehicles gained a reputation for being well-engineered, good-value vehicles. Plymouth was positioned as a value brand for Chrysler. This reputation followed Plymouth into the 1950s. Then, Chrysler changed the script a bit in 1955 with Virgil Exner’s “Forward Look” design. These new cars were low but had towering fins. The American public loved it, taking home tons of Chryslers that year and on. Other improvements came in the form of 12 volt electrical systems, pushbutton transmissions, and Plymouth got its first V8.

In 1956 came the Fury, a white two-door hardtop with gold anodized aluminum trim with a V8 engine, huge fins, and its own special interior. This car comes from the Fury’s third generation and is a Sport Fury, which was the Fury’s top trim. Third-generation Furys are downsized and ride on Chrysler’s unibody B platform. By now, the Fury’s design became restrained and the huge fins were gone. However, the Fury remained at the top of the Plymouth lineup.

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Hemmings Seller

This Sport Fury houses a 361 cubic inch V8 making 265 HP powering the rear wheels through a push-button automatic. The seller believes the vehicle to be mostly original and it comes with its original build sheet and working air-conditioner. It’s $26,300 from the seller in Sebring, Florida, with 55,300 miles.

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1940 Studebaker K10 Tow Truck – $24,500

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Facebook Seller

Studebaker was founded as a wagon builder in 1852. The marque would expand into electric cars in 1902 before assembling gasoline cars in 1904. In those formative days, Studebaker had partners in the Garford Company and Everitt-Metzger-Flanders and sold their vehicles. Studebaker would finally start marketing its own cars in 1912. Its first commercial vehicle was a delivery car and between 1914 and 1915, the company began building trucks and buses.

By the mid-1950s, Studebaker’s truck line was a known name thanks to trucks that had proven themselves over the decades. For example of Stubaker’s market position back then, the company once competed with the likes of Mack and provided trucks to the U.S. military. Studebaker’s trucks also led highway-building expeditions and convoys in Alaska and with allied nations in the UK and the Soviet Union.

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Facebook Seller

This lovely tow truck comes from the era of Studebaker’s truck ascension. In 1938, Studebaker’s trucks were named the K series with the K5 as the 1/2 ton truck, the K10 as the 1 ton truck, and the K20 as a 2 ton truck. The K10, which rode on a 130-inch wheelbase, could be had as a cab and chassis, as a cowl and chassis unit, or with a stake body. These trucks were powered with a 226 cubic inch straight six making 90 HP paired with a four-speed manual transmission.

The seller for this K10 says it was owned by a New Jersey Studebaker dealer until the dealership went under in the 1970s. Then, the truck spent time in a barn until the seller picked it up. Since then, the truck has gotten an engine rebuild and restored brakes. The seller says that the truck is about as original as it gets. The 2-ton Weaver Auto Crane still works, too!

It’s $24,500 from the seller in Springville, Pennsylvania and the truck even comes with an extra engine and other spare parts.

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1991 Lancia Hyena Zagato – Inquire

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Girardo & Co.

What you’re looking at here is actually a Lancia Delta HF Integrale Evoluzione, but with a totally different body. If you’ve never seen this car before, I don’t blame you. Depending on who you ask, just 24 or 25 Lancia Hyenas were ever built. As the story goes, Dutch collector Paul Koot met with famed coachbuilder Elio Zagato, asking why Zagato was no longer building small coupes anymore. Zagato reportedly showed Koot a design by Marco Pedracini, and Koot’s response was to commission the design using the Lancia Delta HF Integrale Evoluzione as a donor vehicle.

Koot reportedly thought that he’d build perhaps a half dozen of the Lancia Hyena, but after 14 or so people placed an order for one at the 1992 Brussels motor show, he felt that perhaps there was an interest for 600 or so units to be made. As Hagerty UK writes, Koot, who was the official Lancia importer for the Netherlands, asked for Lancia’s blessing. Apparently, Lancia didn’t shoot down his idea, but also couldn’t help him. Koot wanted to get rolling chassis for Zagato to mount a hand-formed aluminum body onto, but Lancia couldn’t provide that. Thus, Koot was forced to buy complete Deltas just to have Zagato tear them apart.

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Girardo & Co.

The completed Hyenas lost 440 pounds compared to the hatchbacks they were based on, but having to start with complete cars doubled the cost. These were supposed to compete with the likes of the Fiat Coupé, but its £74,000 price put it up to bat against the Ferrari 348. Even worse, Lancia then announced the end of production for the Delta, so there went Koot’s donor car.

In addition to the weight loss, the Hyenas also cranked up the power. A Lancia Delta HF Integrale Evoluzione made about 207 HP with its 2.0-liter turbo four. These? Well, the Lancia Hyena Zagato came in tunes of 250 HP to 300 HP. That punch of horses transmitted through a manual transmission and the donor car’s four-wheel-drive system. They were claimed to hit 60 mph in 5.4 seconds, though it’s unclear with which tune.

In the end, Koot never came close to 600 units or even his revised 75 units. Just 24 or 25 were built, depending on who you ask. This 1991 Lancia Hyena Zagato has just 16,280 miles on its odometer and comes with a history file complete with period photos, its Certificate of Origin, and more. Inquire for its price from Girardo & Co. in the UK. As for what you could expect to pay? Well, similar Hyenas were listed for more than a quarter million dollars.

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2006 Mazda Mazdaspeed6 – $9,495

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CarGurus Seller

Here’s a genuine Holy Grail entry for about $10,000! Back in January, I wrote about how from 2006 to 2007, you could buy a Mazda sedan packing some serious horsepower under its conservative body:

When the Mazdaspeed6 launched in 2006, Mazda called it “the fastest and best handling sedan ever sold by Mazda.” The automaker then followed it up with “the most powerful car ever sold by Mazda in the US.” That power claim is no longer true today–the new CX-90 features a 3.3-liter inline six turbo making 340 HP–but the Mazdaspeed6 does appear to remain the fastest sedan that Mazda ever sold in America.

Power comes from a Mazda MZR 2.3-liter turbo four making 274 HP and 280 lb-ft torque. That goes through a six-speed manual transmission down to all four wheels through an active torque split all-wheel-drive system. The automated system can send up to 50 percent of the engine’s power to the rear wheels depending on the steering angle, wheelspin, and yaw.

The result is a sedan that boogies to 60 mph in under 6 seconds but looks so anonymous it’ll blend in with the other cars in a big box store parking lot. This one seems clean for a car in the east. It’s $9,495 from the dealer in Fredericksburg, Virginia with 128,585 miles.

That’s it for this week, thank you for reading!

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lowwall
lowwall
6 days ago

That should be called the Lancia Lanos.

Slow Joe Crow
Slow Joe Crow
6 days ago

The XLCR and XR1200 are the only Harley Davidsons I like the looks of but I probably wouldn’t want to ride either one since every time I ride a Harley I’m reminded why I dislike them and have ridden a BMW Airhead for the last 30 years. As for the rest the Studebaker tow truck interests me the most followed by the Lancia.

gubbin
gubbin
7 days ago

Hooray, I’ve been hoping to see an XR1200 here! A worthy (and prettier) successor to the Buell Cyclone.

A. Barth
A. Barth
7 days ago

I like motorcycles a lot, can appreciate a V-twin (primarily Ducati or Moto Guzzi), and do not like Harleys.

However, I kind of want that XR1200. 91HP is sufficient, but the big draw for me is the upright riding position. It’s a pleasant change from the usual feet-forward Harley ergonomics.

TOSSABL
TOSSABL
7 days ago

That Studebaker has all the awesome – split rims notwithstanding. Would love to tool around in it with something antithetical to it on the hook. A Smart, or maybe a Bradley GT-wait: a Citicar. Or BMW i3. You know what I’m saying

AlienProbe
AlienProbe
7 days ago

Ahhhhh That Jensen <3 Absolutely in my top five wants for a dream garage that will never happen. Same color too. Since I can never own the actual thing (po’ people problems) I have the delightful diecast version that was made by Husky before they were acquired by Corgi. It’s my absolute favorite diecast car ever made. The detail on it is spectacular. Thank you for sharing these lists Mercedes! Makes my day every time.

cal67
cal67
7 days ago
Reply to  AlienProbe

I passed on one of these ~ 30 years back for $2500. Not as nice as this one but one I regret letting go.

rootwyrm
rootwyrm
7 days ago

2002 Toyota Mark II Blit 2.5iR-V – $9,902

Another JDM flipper that is trying to not be underwater. Let me get out my nanoscopic violin for them.

Know what these sell for on BeForward? $5-8k including the freight to Baltimore. With lower miles. And BeForward’s the one that overprices everything.

1991 Eagle Talon TSi – $23,000

LOLNO.

1940 Studebaker K10 Tow Truck – $24,500

While this price isn’t entirely unreasonably (especially considering the extras,) please do not buy this truck.
Why? Because it has split rims. If you don’t know what that means, you are in extreme danger. If you do know what means, you know why the ‘patina’ on the wheels is a deadly hazard.
If they’ll come down on price around the cost of replacing the wheels (you are not going to find a shop that will do splits for you,) you’ve got a winner.

2006 Mazda Mazdaspeed6 – $9,495

dealer in Fredericksburg, Virginia with 128,585 miles.

Oh, they’re serious. LET ME LAUGH HARDER.
Virginia, for those of you unfamiliar, uses salt on the roads. Something Mazda’s of this vintage are notoriously vulnerable to. To the point where the suspension and subframe rot out well before the body shows it. And it’s got the notorious MZR 2.3, an engine that let many mechanics retire thanks to guaranteed failure of the timing chain due to defective design. At (checks notes) about 125k. AERA even has a bulletin and special guide that very, very specifically warns that the Mazdaspeed6 never received any of the modifications to keep it from ejecting the chain out the timing cover. Yeah, MZR failure modes consist of inspection ports in your block or your timing chain cover.
So how do you fix it? You have to rebuild the entire goddamn top end, and if the chain already stretched, the bottom end too. And usually including replacing the camshafts.

bubba-ho-tep
bubba-ho-tep
7 days ago
Reply to  rootwyrm

nice thorough analysis. I wish you’d write a regular blog/col called ‘on flip side’ or something

TOSSABL
TOSSABL
7 days ago
Reply to  bubba-ho-tep

I’ll second that. Always enjoy rootwyrm’s dump of facts and snark/invectives

Nsane In The MembraNe
Nsane In The MembraNe
7 days ago

We had no idea how good we had it with Mazda back then. The Speed 3 and 6 were so cool and I honestly think they were both a little ahead of their time. You could literally offer a Japanese AWD, manual sedan with the exact same power right now and there would be an 18 month waitlist for the opportunity to pay $10,000 over MSRP for it…not to mention the Hyundai Ns essentially picked up where the Speed 3 left off by being raucous, completely unpolished, torque steer-ey hoons.

I understand the approach of their current upmarket push and I think they make some great family cars. Plus they still have the Miata around when I’m sure the bean counters would axe it without blinking if given the opportunity. But mannnnn…zoom zoom Mazda will forever be in our hearts.

Last edited 7 days ago by Nsane In The MembraNe
ProudLuddite
ProudLuddite
7 days ago

The Studebaker truck is epic. Real patina, real work truck, awesome long hood.

Slack00
Slack00
7 days ago

I test rode an XR1200 right when they came out in Europe–in Rome, Italy, of all places–and I was dumbfounded how fast and well handling they were. Completely blew away all my Harley expectations. I rode some other Harleys (it was a promotional event at the dealership), but I can only remember the XR1200. 15 years later, and now I still want one…

Jack Trade
Jack Trade
7 days ago
Reply to  Slack00

I was big into flat track when it came out and was amazed it took so long for HD to do this. In almost GM-like fashion, HD put it out just as its fabled XR750 was coming to the end of its national, multi-decade dominance on the track (Indian would soon obliterate it with its new from the ground up FTR).

I ended up getting a Buell instead, but like you, I still kinda want one of these.

Edit: I always felt they were more targeted at the European market, as a sorta piece of iconic America that Americans don’t care about anymore. Flat track hangs on here, but it’s now where near as popular as it was back in the days of On Any Sunday.

Last edited 7 days ago by Jack Trade
Dead Elvis, Inc.
Dead Elvis, Inc.
7 days ago

That old tow truck would be the perfect vehicle for my theoretical “eccentric handyman/estate maintenance guy” retirement plan next phase of life.

The Mazda is pretty fucking sweet, too.

Nsane In The MembraNe
Nsane In The MembraNe
7 days ago

My family has a waterfront property out in rural VA and we’ve used the same eccentric handyman for like 15 years at this point. The dude is an absolute hoot. He’s from Pittsburgh and speaks fluent yinzer but he’s lived in no where VA for so long that he’s now got this twangy yinzer situation going on and it’s epic. He’ll talk for like 15 minutes straight about which substances you’re fine to mix mix and which ones you should NOT mix without any prompt then walk away and do like 3 days worth of drywall work between 8am and 1030.

He’s somehow married to a woman several leagues above him who left her wealthy husband for him while keeping a chunk of the money. He’ll just casually do preventative maintenance on my dad’s car when he has extra time. He was, somehow, the first person to find out my wife and I were engaged. I could keep going…the dude is an absolute legend and a part of the family, and if you don’t have space in your heart for an eccentric handyman I don’t know what to tell you.

Marc Fuhrman
Marc Fuhrman
7 days ago

Oh, a Mazdaspeed 6! I’ve always liked the first generation 6, and the Mazdaspeed was one of the cooler versions.

98Z28
98Z28
7 days ago

Makes no sense and would be a horrid decision, Jensen. Granted the paper world a body molds still exist.

tacotruckdave
tacotruckdave
7 days ago

Yeah Mercedes for the Jensen Interceptor. I believe 318 on the motor. Funny thing a good condition Jensen Healey if you xan find one usually under $10,000. Apparently rarity doesnt translate to profitability. The J H comes from Jensen a UK Body builder for the elite including the English Monarchy before the birth of the recent departed Elizabeth. Then coach h.builder for custom cars. Then partner with Donald Healey trying to create the 1979s Austin Healey 3000. He also designed. But 5mph bumpers and british build quality lost it. But let me tell you a 903 Lotus Motor in a lite weight car at 140 mph is more exciting than an mg or triumph.

Toecutter
Toecutter
7 days ago
Reply to  tacotruckdave

A Jensen Healey was one of the candidates I was considering for EV conversion back in high school, before obtaining my Triumph GT6. For a British car of that era, they are surprisingly well built. Not a fan of the larger/heavier Interceptor, but compared to today’s bloated offerings, it is much preferable.

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