Home » The 2025 Kia Carnival Hybrid Is Theoretically More Expensive Than A Toyota Sienna Hybrid, Might End Up Being Cheaper

The 2025 Kia Carnival Hybrid Is Theoretically More Expensive Than A Toyota Sienna Hybrid, Might End Up Being Cheaper

Kia Carnival Hybrid Ts
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Here at The Autopian, we liked the old Kia Carnival. Not only was it a great van, it was great value, so you can imagine our excitement when a facelifted, hybridized version was announced. Well, pricing is now out, and the cheapest Carnival Hybrid costs $41,895 including freight, which is $2,815 more expensive than the cheapest Toyota Sienna. It might seem weird that a Kia is more expensive than the equivalent Toyota until you look a little deeper and realize the cheapest trims of both vans aren’t quite equal.

In case you aren’t familiar with the new Kia Carnival Hybrid, here are the basics: Instead of a 3.5-liter V6, it features a 1.6-liter turbocharged four-cylinder engine mated to a permanent magnet synchronous drive motor and a 1.49 kWh lithium-ion battery pack, all driving the front wheels through a conventional six-speed automatic transmission. Total system output? An oddly specific 241.7 horsepower and 270.5 lb.-ft. of torque. You don’t normally see car manufacturers publishing output down to the tenths. Regardless of how unusual those figures might be, they’re good enough to earn this 4,852-pound van a maximum towing capacity of 2,500 pounds and a maximum payload capacity of 1,652 pounds, so it ought to get you, your family, and your pop-up trailer to the campsite more economically than a van with a big V6 would. Anyway, let’s get back to pricing.

Vidframe Min Top
Vidframe Min Bottom

Instead of building the Carnival Hybrid off of the base LX trim, Kia took things up a notch by making the LX-S trim the entry point to its electrified minivan range. That means you get leatherette upholstery, heated front seats, and a leather-wrapped steering wheel, among other creature comforts. That puts the cheapest Carnival Hybrid in direct competition with the Sienna XLE, which starts at $44,390 — $2,495 more than the Carnival Hybrid LX-S.

2025 Carnival

However, as you go up the range, a funny thing happens — the Carnival Hybrid inches closer and closer in price to an equivalent Sienna. Let’s say you’re looking at the top trims of both vans without any options, the Sienna Platinum and the Carnival SX Prestige. Both feature heated steering wheels, branded premium audio systems, wireless smartphone charging, and leather seats. However, the Kia stickers for $53,995, only $535 less than the equivalent $54,530 Sienna Platinum.

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2025 Carnival Hybrid

Elsewhere in the respective ranges, it’s a war of inches. The $46,630 Sienna XSE gets sporty styling bits, sports seats, a moonroof, and some extra USB ports that the $44,095 Carnival Hybrid EX doesn’t get, but the Carnival matches it everywhere else while costing $2,535 less. Moving one level up beyond that in the Carnival range gets you to the $48,995 SX trim, which adds some sporty appearance bits, a fully digital gauge cluster, a 115-volt inverter, ventilated front seats, and reverse parking collision avoidance, and dual moonroofs, but it slots in between the aforementioned Sienna XSE and the $51,340 Sienna Limited, which doesn’t have a rear moonroof or a standard inverter, but does add second-row captain’s chairs with ottomans, and a branded JBL audio system.

2025 Carnival

However, there’s one big thing that could tip the scales in the Carnival’s favor — availability. Despite peak car market craziness having already passed, Siennas are notoriously hard to get, with regular reports of waitlists and markups affecting actual transaction prices. So long as Kia keeps supply of these vans flowing, people will be able to buy them off dealer lots, and so long as dealers don’t mark them up, we could be seeing radically different all-in prices for Carnivals compared to Siennas. With some Sienna buyers still reporting $5,000-plus dealer markups in some areas and months-long waitlists nationwide, Kia seems willing to roll the dice.

2025 Carnival

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The 2025 Kia Carnival Hybrid may be pricey compared to what last year’s pre-facelift gasoline-powered van sold for, but it’s still one of the less expensive hybrid minivans in America, and it’s ready to steal some market share from Toyota at just the right time. However, hinging on dealerships delivering these vans at MSRP is a risky game. Oh, and we also don’t yet have official EPA fuel economy figures. Make that two things we’ll be keeping a close eye on over the coming months.

(Photo credits: Kia)

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Scruffinater
Scruffinater
23 days ago

so it ought to get you, your family, and your pop-up trailer to the campsite more economically than a van with a big V6 would

Pretty sure you have that backwards. Around town moving people and some stuff, the hybrid drivetrain will handily beat the v6 on economy. Buuuut load that sucker down at max payload and towing and take it on the highway and the v6 will easily beat the hybrid. I would bet even just at max payload on the highway the v6 will at least be even if not slightly better, plus being more pleasant to drive.

Not saying you shouldn’t get the hybrid, just know your use case. Most minivans spend most of their time schlepping people and stuff around town, so the hybrid will be great. Even if it’s your primary road-trip vehicle, which minivans are also great for, few people spend that much time road tripping compared to the rest of their life.

MegaVan
MegaVan
23 days ago

Turbo Gas Engine + Full Transmission + Battery + Electric < NA Engine + direct drive + Battery + Electric.

Sienna wins reliability.

Rollin Hand
Rollin Hand
23 days ago

It may be “better value”, but I susp3ct once one factors in depreciation, the Toyota works out cheaper long-term.

If you can get one.

Automotiveflux
Automotiveflux
23 days ago

My Dad used to work for a company with a fleet of Siennas, Grand Caravans and Carnivals (all wheelchair converted) and the Siennas were by far the nicest of the bunch with the older Grand Caravans up next and the Carnivals far behind. They were constantly having issues with them to the point that the fleet manager had enough and was phasing them out early to get more Siennas. Long story short I would be concerned about the long term reliability with these.

Healpop
Healpop
23 days ago

Curious if they fixed the sliding doors. We looked at these last fall, and the force required to stop the automatic doors was quite surprising, enough it would definitely hurt if you got a limb/finger trapped. They had a recall, but it didn’t actually fix the issue. Considering we were buying it to ferry little kids around this was actually a big reason we went with the Odyssey.
https://www.consumerreports.org/cars/car-recalls-defects/kia-carnival-minivan-recalled-after-sliding-door-injuries-a5422251546/

Drive By Commenter
Drive By Commenter
23 days ago

While I’m glad this exists, this misses the mark in some ways.
241 hp in a 4900 lb vehicle is adequate. But, that’s a tiny battery. This seems more of a mild hybrid system. Fine for around town but isn’t going to help a lot on highway trips. No AWD is another miss. Especially for towing it’s helpful in getting going.

That said for the main uses it’ll be fine. It doesn’t cover the edge cases as well as Sienna.

Goose
Goose
23 days ago

It’s a perfectly normal size in a non-plug-in hybrid vehicle. The Sienna only has a marginally larger 1.9kWh battery. A F150 hybrid has a somewhat smaller 1.5kWh. An Accord hybrid only has 1.3kWh worth of storage. Putting massive batteries in hybrids doesn’t net a huge improvement in efficiency. You basically want enough battery storage to be able to harvest a handful of typical, full stop regen braking scenarios, plus some static load while “ideling”, plus some headroom. Hybrids are continually charging and discharging, that’s how they improve efficiency; continually putting what would be wasted energy back to good use. I’d wager, doubling the battery size wouldn’t even net a 10% improvement in efficiency.

Last edited 23 days ago by Goose
Drive By Commenter
Drive By Commenter
23 days ago
Reply to  Goose

Thank you for the explanation! Looks like I confused a regular hybrid with a PHEV.

Greensoul
Greensoul
23 days ago

I’m still pissed at all get out with Kia right now. Look, I have a Soul, love it, my 3rd one, my Mom has a Forte I bought her in 2017. Both have been recalled for the theft thing. I’ve been fine. Mom has had over 4k in claims after 2 attempts to steal her Forte. They don’t steal it, just break windows and destroy the steering column. Apparently the dumb fucks don’t see the blinking “Hey thug, I’m alarmed” red light on the dash. Seriously, 2 times now. I love my Soul, but can’t say I’d ever buy another Kia (on my 3rd one now) over this theft thing. My sisters Tesla 3 got totaled out in the last hail storm. She doesn’t want another Tesla, not because she hates her car, she hates Elon Musk. She’s looking at a Kia K6. Its hard for me to recommend another Kia after the theft thing. I have been steering her towards a Mach E. Anyone out there have a Mustang Mach E? What are your thoughts? My family buys what I suggest so I can’t mess this recommendation up.

Genewich
Genewich
23 days ago
Reply to  Greensoul

I have a Mach-E and I love driving it. I also love the mostly normal controls, lights, turn signals, wipers, and so on. What I don’t love is the number of times I’ve had it in the shop in the last 2.5 years, and not just for fancy new-model-new-drivetrain stuff, but crap Ford has been making for decades:

Driver’s window switch cluster
Driver’s airbag (the cover was cracking at the seams)
Driver’s seatbelt sensor
A short in the wiring for the top center camera that required the removal of the entire front half of my interior to fix. The instructions for the TSB were like 27 pages.

However, I am impressed with my dealership. All of these were done under warranty without hassle, and the interior has remained noise free despite the disassembly.

We’ve always had Fords because my dad sold them for over 30 years, and we’ve never had any trouble, but I’d have a hard time buying another one after this.

Kyree
Kyree
23 days ago

I’d be all for the Kia Carnival. It’s a swank car, and I find the Toyota Sienna’s cabin materials and general presentation deeply unimpressive. But now that my sister’s Soul has both had to get its engine replaced and then was recently stolen and crashed—both due to entirely preventable design defects on Kia’s part…I wouldn’t buy one of their cars if it was a dollar.

Nor would I be willing to pay a markup or give up an organ for the privilege of waiting a year on a Sienna.

I think I’d roll the dice on a Pacifica Pinnacle PHEV and a good warranty. There are deals to be had there, and that is *also* a very nice people-mover.

BolognaBurrito
BolognaBurrito
23 days ago
Reply to  Kyree

Pacifica is awesome, when it works. Such a shame reliability is so shit despite the PHEV being available for years now.

Lincoln Clown CaR
Lincoln Clown CaR
24 days ago

I guess things have changed, but in ’22 we were very interested in the Carnival, but they were complete unobtanium. Couldn’t even find one to test drive. I certainly wasn’t going to buy one (and pay over MSRP) without a test drive.

Óscar Morales Vivó
Óscar Morales Vivó
24 days ago

There was very little you could test drive back in 2022…

Brandon Forbes
Brandon Forbes
24 days ago

A 1.6 turbo in a 5k lb vehicle is crazy. Sure there’s the electric motor, but with that tiny of a battery I can’t imagine this thing moves very well. I think I’ll stick with my old Sienna. Seeing nothing here worth jumping at.

Andrew Daisuke
Andrew Daisuke
24 days ago

what the hell is Toyota doing with the lack of availability on so many of their cars/trucks?

Vic Vinegar
Vic Vinegar
24 days ago
Reply to  Andrew Daisuke

It has to be costing them sales. Hell, I am pretty set on a Toyota hybrid, but the longer I can’t even get in to test drive one, the more I start looking elsewhere and rationalizing buying something else.

Scoutdude
Scoutdude
24 days ago
Reply to  Vic Vinegar

Yeah not everyone can/wants to get on a months long wait list.

Eloxley
Eloxley
24 days ago
Reply to  Vic Vinegar

It’s the popularity of the hybrids at the moment. There are a few classes/sizes where Toyota may have more than 1 competitor offering a hybrid, and not always competitors with a track record of reliability. Honda only offers 2-3 hybrids out of 8 ICE models while Toyota will soon have 14 hybrids out of 17 ICE models.

That said, Toyota’s dealer allocation process is strange and seems more dated than an original Prius.

Raptor
Raptor
24 days ago
Reply to  Andrew Daisuke

At this point it has to be intentional, and it’s costing them sales. I currently own two Toyotas and a Lexus, and value the brand for its overall quality and reliability. But if I were buying new today, in most every vehicle category I would buy the competition and save thousands (and, you know, actually be able to buy instead of waiting months). Midsize pickup? I’d buy a Frontier instead of a Tacoma. Full size pickup? F150 instead of Tundra. Minivan? Odyssey instead of Sienna. And so forth. It’s a bit disappointing to me that Toyota has chosen the higher price/lower volume route to profitability, even though I understand the business rationale.

Kyree
Kyree
23 days ago
Reply to  Andrew Daisuke

I think they learned from the pandemic to deliberately constrain production—especially on their hybrids—in order to avoid having to provide incentives and keep resale values high.

It’s the Ferrari M.O.

Anoos
Anoos
24 days ago

The Kia Carnival ALMOST makes me wish I had kids.

I love these things. I think they look great, and the interior options are fantastic.

Albert Ferrer
Albert Ferrer
24 days ago
Reply to  Anoos

You can always buy one as a GT car. I like the idea of MPVs, without the need to occupy all of the seats.

Anoos
Anoos
24 days ago
Reply to  Albert Ferrer

I have dogs.

Not enough to justify a minivan, but too many to stuff into a GT’s back seat.

Albert Ferrer
Albert Ferrer
24 days ago
Reply to  Anoos

Back in the day Ford made the “sports MPV”, the S-Max. I guess that would have fit the bill.

Chris Stevenson
Chris Stevenson
24 days ago
Reply to  Albert Ferrer

Even better would be the Renault Avantime, one of the most aptly named cars in history.

Anoos
Anoos
24 days ago

Ewww. It has megane butt.

Albert Ferrer
Albert Ferrer
24 days ago
Reply to  Anoos

But everything else is magnificent, including being a true hardtop.

Óscar Morales Vivó
Óscar Morales Vivó
24 days ago
Reply to  Anoos

That was the one car where the megane butt looked right.

Anoos
Anoos
24 days ago
Reply to  Albert Ferrer

I don’t like the S-Max. I lived in a townhouse condo for a while. My obnoxious neighbors had an S-Max. They would often park in the fire lane. On Sunday I opened the garage door and started my Miata to let it warm up a bit before heading to C&C. I ran upstairs and grabbed my wallet, ran back down and hopped into the car, backed out into the open rear door of that a-hole’s S-Max.

Ruined my day (never went to C&C) and cost me like $3500 to fix their car (just replaced the spoiler on the Miata for $75). I hope their kid gets bullied.

Albert Ferrer
Albert Ferrer
24 days ago
Reply to  Anoos

Such an unfortunate coincidence as the car drives really well. I don’t have direct experience with the S-Max, but yes with the Galaxy and for a big, tall and heavy car handled well and was really comfortable.

Barring that, the Avantime then. But it is now quite old. I guess the MPVs are really a dying breed…

Anoos
Anoos
24 days ago
Reply to  Albert Ferrer

My bad. It turns out neither are an option here. I don’t remember what my jerk neighbor drove, but it was a Ford wagon thing. It doesn’t look like the S-Max was a US thing (or at least the images that come up don’t look familiar) so that probably wasn’t it.

Dogisbadob
Dogisbadob
24 days ago
Reply to  Anoos

Maybe you’re thinking of the C-Max? Which we did get.

Anoos
Anoos
24 days ago
Reply to  Dogisbadob

No, it was bigger and had a more traditional long roof profile. Would have been on sale around 2014. I thought it had Max in the name but I may be wrong.

Edit: I can’t find it. Now I’m even more mad that I hit a hallucination and still paid for damages.

Last edited 24 days ago by Anoos
Undecided profile name
Undecided profile name
24 days ago
Reply to  Anoos

Was it a Ford flex?

Anoos
Anoos
24 days ago

No. I would have remembered that. Taurus X? Was that a thing?

It was a Ford Taurus X.

Infinitely more interesting than my c-word neighbors.

Last edited 24 days ago by Anoos
Scoutdude
Scoutdude
24 days ago
Reply to  Anoos

Yes the Taurus X was a thing which was a lightly freshened and renamed Freestyle which was sold when the final Taurus was sold as the Five Hundred.

Michael Rogers
Michael Rogers
24 days ago

Those look like Travelalls to me.

Michael Rogers
Michael Rogers
24 days ago
Reply to  Anoos

In no way do I hope their kid has to live through being bullied. That is a deeply crap experience.

Anoos
Anoos
23 days ago
Reply to  Michael Rogers

Virtue signal received, but unnecessary. It was obviously a joke.

Cheap Bastard
Cheap Bastard
23 days ago
Reply to  Anoos

If they habitually park in the fire lane what’s to stop you from turning them in?

Anoos
Anoos
23 days ago
Reply to  Cheap Bastard

I’m no rat.

Pupmeow
Pupmeow
23 days ago
Reply to  Anoos

I don’t know why this comment made me choke on my coffee. But it did.

The weather is crap and I have 17 meetings today, so thank you for the morning laugh.

Hugh Crawford
Hugh Crawford
24 days ago
Reply to  Albert Ferrer

That smacks of confusion with mvp.

Dogisbadob
Dogisbadob
24 days ago
Reply to  Anoos

Get a SWB Transit Connect.

Albert Ferrer
Albert Ferrer
24 days ago
Reply to  Dogisbadob

That is a van that drives like a van. An MPV is a completely different experience, it is a car.

On our last trip with 5 friends they wanted to rent a van, but I insisted on an MPV. We got a Galaxy, which was great.

Dogisbadob
Dogisbadob
24 days ago
Reply to  Albert Ferrer

The Transit Connect is based on the Focus, except it has a real transmission and not the stupid PowerShit DCT.

The TC is just a Focus with more space inside, that’s all 🙂

It’s also smaller than the Carnival, Ody, Sienna, etc. That helps with driving dynamics, too.

Rippstik
Rippstik
24 days ago

The Toyota will certainly last longer than this.

Alexander Moore
Alexander Moore
24 days ago
Reply to  Rippstik

I would agree, but most people aren’t really buying vans for longevity. They get ’em, use ’em for five to ten years, then get rid of them as soon as the kids are grown. Sucks for the second or third owners, but to be fair hybrids tend to be more reliable than non-hybrids for most brands.

XXLTall
XXLTall
24 days ago

Why would you get one over the Pacifica plug in? Now with $7,500 discount!

Rippstik
Rippstik
24 days ago
Reply to  XXLTall

Because the Pacifica PHEV is a pile of unreliable refuse.

Vic Vinegar
Vic Vinegar
24 days ago
Reply to  Rippstik

Yeah as much as I want to like the PHEV, there seems to be a strong consensus that the Pacifica (and Wrangler) PHEVs are junk.

The Dude
The Dude
24 days ago
Reply to  Vic Vinegar

Had a Pacifica rental for a week and with only 10k miles on the odometer and the ICE sounded like it was already done with life.

Last edited 24 days ago by The Dude
MGA
MGA
23 days ago
Reply to  The Dude

Exactly this, but it was 6k miles. She did get our bachelor party successfully through a long weekend in Austin, though. Thank goodness for the extra insurance.

Pupmeow
Pupmeow
23 days ago
Reply to  Vic Vinegar

Stellantis PHEVs are an embarrassment.

Schrödinger's Catbox
Schrödinger's Catbox
23 days ago
Reply to  XXLTall

Expensive, but very likely driveable daily. The Stellantis PHEV, expensive, but there’s a rebate, and you get lots of dealership coffee for the many visits to fix the next thing that fails.

Cameron Palm
Cameron Palm
24 days ago

Why the hell would you not make this a phev?

Dogisbadob
Dogisbadob
24 days ago

Why the fuck would they put a turbo on the hybrid? Seems silly. Also too bad it’s not a PHEV. The plugin capability would be awesome.

Hyundai needs to sell the Staria over here.

TXJeepGuy
TXJeepGuy
24 days ago
Reply to  Dogisbadob

Wait till you hear how many plug in hybrids have 2.0T engines

Dogisbadob
Dogisbadob
24 days ago
Reply to  TXJeepGuy

yeah, but this is Kia, remember, so still kind of scary. And it’s only a 1.6T in a big minivan.

In the K5, they recently replaced the base turbo engine with a non-turbo. However, the high-performance GT turbo is still available, but that’s the sporty model.

Albert Ferrer
Albert Ferrer
24 days ago
Reply to  Dogisbadob

Aren’t turbo engines (potentially) more efficient than normally aspirated ones?

Dogisbadob
Dogisbadob
24 days ago
Reply to  Albert Ferrer

only in EPA testing 😛

The modern turbo shit is primarily to game the EPA ratings and doesn’t actually give you good mpg in real life.

Albert Ferrer
Albert Ferrer
24 days ago
Reply to  Dogisbadob

Well actually… using exhaust gases to drive a turbine to get more power, which otherwise would just go to waste… should theoretically increase efficiency shouldn’t it?

In gentle driving the C300 in the motorway gets 7l/100km (that is around 33-34mpg) while the engine is a lot stronger than the old V6.

I miss normally aspirated engines as much as anybody else, but in terms of efficiency / performance it is hard to argue.

Kleinlowe
Kleinlowe
24 days ago
Reply to  Dogisbadob

Well, in a hybrid, in *theory*, a turbo (or supercharged or wankel or turbine or 1:6th scale Napier Deltic or whatever) engine with a very narrow power band can be very efficient because it can sit at whatever RPM range it likes making electrons, while the electric side of things takes care of the business of making sure there’s actually enough torque to on top of that to move the car around.

Hugh Crawford
Hugh Crawford
24 days ago
Reply to  Kleinlowe

“ 1:6th scale Napier Deltic”
Oh, can I have one?
1:6 scale would be 1/216 the volume, 88 liters would be about 40cc

Hmm, 1/4 scale would be a litre and a half, that sounds more like it.

Drive By Commenter
Drive By Commenter
23 days ago
Reply to  Albert Ferrer

Keep it out of using excessive boost and they can be very efficient. My turbo Cruze has averaged about 40 mpg the last several tanks with the AC cranked. It gets driven fairly gently most of the time.

On a modern small displacement turbo engine the turbo is always active. Even if it’s helping boost the air pressure to a little higher than atmospheric. That’s not getting into positive boost but it’s not just loafing waiting for the next foot full of throttle.

Hugh Crawford
Hugh Crawford
24 days ago

So about that name. Do they mean carnival like the rejection of the flesh, or like full of clowns?

Anoos
Anoos
24 days ago
Reply to  Hugh Crawford

Obviously the clown thing.

Óscar Morales Vivó
Óscar Morales Vivó
24 days ago
Reply to  Hugh Crawford

It’s flesh-less clowns, obviously.

Hugh Crawford
Hugh Crawford
24 days ago

Don’t google that, or its obvious variations.

Last edited 24 days ago by Hugh Crawford
R53 Lifer
R53 Lifer
24 days ago

Still not a PHEV? Still don’t give a Phu…

Eric Gonzalez
Eric Gonzalez
24 days ago

I thought I hated the “tablet stuck on top of the dash” fad, but I wasn’t prepared for what was to come. Ugh.

The Dude
The Dude
24 days ago
Reply to  Eric Gonzalez

Designers who didn’t finish designing the inside are thankful.

Rick Garcia
Rick Garcia
24 days ago

It’s way cheaper than a Sienna. The 2 Toyota dealerships here in San Jose are charging $10k over msrp!

Albert Ferrer
Albert Ferrer
24 days ago

Kia (and Hyundai) are not bargain-basement brands anymore (and haven’t been for a long time). They can compete with anyone else and come out on top.

Cryptoenologist
Cryptoenologist
24 days ago
Reply to  Albert Ferrer

Except in the realm of dealership experience. They may offer an amazing warranty, but you will be punished for using it.

Schrödinger's Catbox
Schrödinger's Catbox
23 days ago

I have to argue with this statement.

I’ve owned a number of H/K vehicles. Not once have I run into issues as long as the following were true:

  • I kept receipts
  • I followed maintenance schedules
  • I didn’t beat the brakes off the vehicle, and
  • I understood what the warranty did, and did not, cover.

We have several Kia and Hyundai dealers nearby. The service teams seem to genuinely try to do a good job. Facilities vary from lightly refreshed to really damn nice.

Granted, this is my own experience, but I don’t understand the punishment statement.

Side note, my last vehicle was a 2018 Kia Sorento SX, loaded up with options. Beautiful and well-made too. I sent an email to the “contact us” box with Kia America, and actually received a reply from the PR team at the West Point, GA plant inviting me to visit and tour. They are proud of their staff and what they do, which is build some pretty nice vehicles.

Cryptoenologist
Cryptoenologist
23 days ago

I have a Hyundai and a Kia, I haven’t brought the Kia in to the dealer yet, but my general dealership experience hasn’t been great. It’s a long story but they covered the repairs under warranty which took 6 months. Wouldn’t give me a loaner for the first 4 months, then, when they did they got me a rental car. 6 months later Hertz charged me for the rental because the dealership never paid them. During the time it was in the shop it was impossible to get updates, they didn’t answer the phone, basically had to march in there to get any information. Now, I’m out $2800 and struggling to get reimbursed. Hyundai corporate has generally been helpful but because it turned into an issue with Hertz(caused by the dealership) I’ve been out nearly $3k for almost 2 months.

Schrödinger's Catbox
Schrödinger's Catbox
23 days ago

I’m sorry, that really is a crap experience. It makes one wish the manufacturers could exert their will a bit more on some of these dealerships.

Hertz has their own issues (having people arrested for car theft when the car was actually returned properly). Seeing that they got pantsed on their Q1 results ($392 million loss) does not make me feel sad.

I wish you luck, perhaps get a local attorney to send a letter asking them in the nicest legalese to get this sorted, post-haste?

Speedway Sammy
Speedway Sammy
24 days ago
Reply to  Albert Ferrer

Do resale values reflect this? I’d be interested in some research on this. Tellurides and Palisades are everywhere around here so some solid data should be available in the coming years.

Anoos
Anoos
24 days ago
Reply to  Speedway Sammy

Their cars are priced in the ballpark of their competition and I consider them equal value.

I know the dealer experience is different, but I’ve never loved my Toyota or Subaru dealer experience (4 hours for a scheduled oil change? Up yours, Toyota) so I don’t consider that a big difference. Anything I can reasonably fix without going to the dealer, I will.

MGA
MGA
23 days ago
Reply to  Albert Ferrer

Eeehhhh……. They’re certainly better than they were 10+ years ago.

Albert Ferrer
Albert Ferrer
23 days ago
Reply to  MGA

They have been good for more than 15 years…

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyundai_i30

MGA
MGA
21 days ago
Reply to  Albert Ferrer

I’m also counting mastering white paint in my assessment.

Thatmiataguy
Thatmiataguy
22 days ago
Reply to  Albert Ferrer

I think what you meant is that they can compete with anyone on price by cutting corners with engineering and then adding features that other manufacturers charge extra for as a way to get people to buy vehicles that are almost certain to end up in a junkyard by 150,000 miles.

Cars built without engine immobilizers, the Theta II engine problems … every time someone says “this isn’t the Hyundai/Kia your parents drove” we find out about some new way they managed to cost cut things to ensure that these cars are disposable.

My grandmother has a 2010 Azera that recently got its engine rebuilt (so stupid) and it STILL clatters on startup and burns oil, and I had a neighbor that had to ditch their 130k mile 2012 Sonata because its engine was on the way out. Hyundais/Kias are Korean VW’s reliability-wise and no one can convince me otherwise.

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