Home » The 2025 Ram Ramcharger: A Tesla-Sized Battery And A Big Gas Engine Create The Perfect Truck

The 2025 Ram Ramcharger: A Tesla-Sized Battery And A Big Gas Engine Create The Perfect Truck

2025 Ram 1500 Ramcharger Tungsten
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The Ramcharger name is back after a 30 year hiatus, and it’s here in the form of a brilliant series-hybrid pickup truck with a big battery and a big V6 gas engine. It’s called the 2025 Ram Ramcharger, and you can think of this plug-in hybrid as the missing link between the regular gas only-powered Ram 1500 and the all-electric Ram 1500 REV, blending electric might with the benefits of internal combustion. While Ram previously teased an electric truck with some sort of range extender, few expected it to be this beautifully executed, melding familiar technology with futuristic propulsion, sports car-rivaling zero-to-60 mph acceleration figures (thanks to 663 horsepower), and a claimed 690 miles of combined range — with about 145 of those being all-electric. Here’s what we know about one of the most exciting pickup truck debuts in decades.

Make no mistake, this thing is classic Chrysler, going in for the kill when other automakers are pondering the status quo, listening to the desires of America, and getting the people going — think the Hellcat engine, the minivan, the Wrangler, and the 1993 Dodge Ram. This new truck could change everything, especially because nobody else is doing what it’s doing.

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A Gas V6 Engine Acts As A Generator For A Big Battery

Ram 1500 Ramcharger Callouts 2Let’s get straight into Ram’s new hybrid pickup. Underneath the 2025 Ram Ramcharger is a massive yet somewhat modest battery pack. Don’t get me wrong, it still features a substantial 92 kWh capacity (huge for a hybrid — it’s about what you’d find in some Tesla Model S variants, and bigger than any Model 3 pack), but that’s far off of the Ram 1500 REV’s 168 kWh base pack.

Still, that’s enough juice to get you an estimated 145 miles as a pure EV alone, and it’s of course plenty of juice to dish out 7.2 kW of battery bank power for tailgates, jobsites, and emergencies. Imagine running your corded tools off of this thing. Mind you, the Ram Ramcharger only runs on a 400-volt architecture, meaning DC fast charging speeds top out at 145 kW (that’ll get you “up to” 50 miles of EV range in just 10 minutes, per Ram). That so-so charging speed may sound like a bummer, but it really isn’t, because there’s another way the Ramcharger keeps moving — just fill it up with gas.

2025 Ram 1500 Ramcharger

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Need to tow a questionable car across three or four states? No problem, a gasoline-powered 3.6-liter Pentastar V6 has you covered so you can yank the truck’s 14,000 pounds of towing capacity without worrying too much about range. Payload capacity clocks in at 2,625 pounds, just in case you were wondering.

Oh, and did I mention that this 3.6-liter Pentastar V6 isn’t connected to the wheels in any way? Instead, it just spins a 130kW (174 hp) generator, which can recharge the batteries or dump power to the drive motors. Basically, the Ramcharger is an enormous BMW i3, just without the carbon fiber monocoque.

2025 Ram 1500 Ramcharger

The 145 mile range is a ridiculously solid figure for everyday use, but maybe not a headline number in a world of 240-mile EV trucks. Still, Ram does tout a targeted combined range of 690 miles, which should do plenty. Also excessive? Try on 663 horsepower, 615 lb.-ft. of torque, and zero-to-60 mph in 4.4 seconds. Those latter figures come courtesy of a 250 kW motor up front and a 238 kW motor out back (note the independent rear suspension replacing the solid axle found on all gas Ram 1500s to date), with the rear motor featuring a locking differential for when the going gets seriously slippery.

Stealth Wealth

2025 Ram 1500 Ramcharger

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Of course, most people probably won’t notice a Ramcharger on the road, chiefly because it looks extremely normal. The taillights and tailgate on higher trims are borrowed directly from the Ram 1500 REV electric pickup truck, while the front end is similar to that on high-end trims of the facelifted gasoline-powered 2025 Ram 1500. The result is a truck that looks, well, like a truck. Big grille up front, big bodysides, and little but taillights, lug nuts, and badges to mark green credentials. Even the inside is pretty normal, now that gasoline-powered Ram 1500s gain an optional 10.25-inch passenger-side screen.

2025 Ram 1500 Ramcharger

Mind you, “normal” by Ram standards still means the cabin’s absolutely spectacular. With a hard push upmarket over the past few years, Ram is dominating the “Cowboy Cadillac” segment with rich materials, lush scents, and impressive tech. Seriously, the next time you’re at an auto show, poke your nose into a Ram Longhorn. It smells like a Kardashian’s walk-in closet in there.

While there’s no Longhorn trim on offer, the top dog Tungsten model is mighty enticing. Knurled metallic accents? Check. A sueded headliner? Check. Level 2 hands-free advanced driver assistance? Check. Glass surfaces? Check. A 23-speaker, 1,228-watt Klipsch Reference Premiere audio system. Check. Hang on, is Klipsch still owned by Voxx International? It is? Well, I guess we’ll just have to judge this system with our own ears. Still, with luxuries like these, who needs a Mercedes-Benz EQS anyway?

2025 Ram 1500 Ramcharger Tradesman

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Alright, so reveling in luxury is a bit crass considering the cost of living crisis, so let’s walk down the range. There’s the Limited sitting second from the top, then the Laramie, then the more sensible Big Horn, then the fleet-spec Tradesman. I wouldn’t be surprised if the walk-up from Tradesman to Tungsten could swallow an entire truck, but since Ram hasn’t released pricing, we’ll just have to twiddle our thumbs.

Why It Might Be The Perfect Truck

2025 Ram 1500 Ramcharger Tungsten

The 2025 Ram Ramcharger offers nearly all of the upsides of an electric pickup truck with none of the downsides. Imagine driving around on electric power nearly all the time, then use the gasoline-powered generator and the robust network of gas stations to road trip and tow. You can juice up at home overnight, travel to work, then run the obligatory after-work errands, then head home on electric power alone. I bet the average person would run the truck on as an EV only for 99% of their usage.

However, if you want to go on a road trip or tow a beached whale back into the sea or just generally explore the corner cases Americans often buy vehicles for, you can because there’s a 3.6-liter V6 shoulder to lean on once you exhaust the electric range.

Hell, this thing might even get better gas mileage than a regular V6 truck, given that the generator can be run in a fixed RPM band for optimal efficiency. Oh, and the range extender could also pay dividends both ways, as a 2020 study published in the UK’s Institute of Engineering and Technology journal found that “Compared to an all-electric in the proposed SHEV configuration the battery peak-to-peak voltage and average and peak power are reduced. These contribute to an improved battery energy usage and potentially lifetime operation.”

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The electric transition won’t be overnight and it definitely won’t be painless, but more plug-in series-hybrid vehicles should make the next decade easier. Ram is certainly on the pulse of now and, depending on both pricing and how the Ramcharger drives, it could have a slam-dunk on its hands.

From Badass Beginnings

We’d be remiss if we didn’t at least talk about the Ramcharger name.

For three generations (well, two in America), the Ramcharger was a Dodge. Basically, it was a cut-down pickup truck all SUV’d-up, then thrust into battle against titans like the Chevrolet K5 Blazer and Ford Bronco. Needless to say, it was awesome and is sorely missed.

First Generation Ramcharger

The first-generation Ramcharger (pictured above) and the second-generation Ramcharger) pictured below both ruled, but their 19-year reign proved just long enough to see the dawn of the four-door SUV. Needless to say, two-door SUV sales never really recovered.

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Second Generation Ramcharger

Oh, and it’s a crying shame that the U.S. never got the third-generation Mexican Ramcharger because just look at it. If this thing isn’t the most kickass use of Caravan taillights, I don’t know what is.

Third Generation Ramcharger

Let’s face it: For most Americans, the Ramcharger name has been dead for 30 years. While Ram has flirted with the Ramcharger name before, it’s usually been emblazoned on wireless charging pads rather than on the outsides of vehicles. Now, it’s back from the dead, and I have some mixed feelings about it.

2025 Ram 1500 Ramcharger Bighorn

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It feels a bit weird for Ram to plaster the Ramcharger name on something that isn’t an SUV of some sort. Sure, Jeep cannibalization is a real concern, but this set of badges might take some getting used to. Imagine if Ford had called the F-150 Lightning the Bronco, and you may be able to see where I’m coming from. Whatever it’s called though, the 2025 Ram Ramcharger is the most exciting upcoming pickup truck because it takes electrification and puts a distinctly made-for-America twist on it.

(Photo credits: Ram, Dodge)

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Deathspeed
Deathspeed
8 months ago

The brodozer crowd is gonna balk at a V-6, no matter how much overall power is put to the pavement. Good.
I am old and cranky enough that I never consider any passenger vehicle V-6 to be a “big engine.” Never mind that my 2013 Grand Caravan 3.6l makes more horsepower than my 95 Z-28’s 350 cid (5.7l for you whippersnappers) LT1. A 350 is a middle-size engine; “big” starts at 400 (6.6l).
I forgot where I was going with this. Ma, bring me my meds!

EVDesigner
EVDesigner
8 months ago

I can’t wait to get cut off by one 20 feet from a highway exit.

FloridaNative
FloridaNative
8 months ago

This is the perfect truck (for me). Instantly jumped to the top of our next vehicle purchase list (by a sizable margin). All electric in day to day use that can still tow our travel trailer without frequent recharge stops. And can power said camper’s air conditioner while boondocking via on-board inverter and large traction battery.

Genewich
Genewich
8 months ago
Reply to  FloridaNative

The only thing that would top this for me is a smaller truck with the same idea.

FloridaNative
FloridaNative
8 months ago
Reply to  Genewich

Agreed! I don’t need the 14k towing. Even half that would be fine for me. But I don’t see Toyota putting that big of a battery in and making a PHEV new Tacoma with anywhere near that payload.

Last edited 8 months ago by FloridaNative
Crimedog
Crimedog
8 months ago
Reply to  FloridaNative

Agreed. I kind of wish I hadn’t jumped on my current full-sized pickup, but this looks awesome. I REALLY like that the gas engine just sets an RPM and goes. Except for the 3.6 (in my memory, anyway) being famous for oil leaks, it should extend the oil change interval.

I am curious what markup my local dealers will drop on it.
But, I like it. UConnect is beyond the “least sucky” ICE system to the point I would say it is pretty good.

Gubbin
Gubbin
8 months ago
Reply to  FloridaNative

Yeah, this with a gooseneck horse camper-trailer is now at the top of my “won the lottery” list.

CEVette
CEVette
8 months ago
Reply to  FloridaNative

Agreed.
This would even replace the diesel 2500/3500 for most towing applications unless you get into stupid heavy trailers.
I worry about RAM reliability, and would give this a few years in production for the kinks to shake out.
I also still am not 100% sold on battery longevity and the high replacement cost. My last diesel truck was 18 years old when I traded for newer, and I expect similar life on the replacement. 18 years with minimal repairs…..I need to see that on a battery vehicle. Also, the 18 year old truck sold for a bit more than 1/3 of the purchase price when it was new…..will this hybrid be the same?
That said, this has my attention for sure.

Bearddevil
Bearddevil
8 months ago

We need to start a betting pool on just *how* expensive this truck is going to be. Because it’s going to be eye-wateringly expensive, even in the base trim, which is likely to be unobtanium, anyway. I’m going to place my bet on the Tradesman eventually having a $68K MSRP, but the cheapest one you’ll ever find will be over $80K.

Rabob Rabob
Rabob Rabob
8 months ago
Reply to  Bearddevil

I doubt you’ll see one under 100,000. It’s an incredible vehicle though.

Mike Smith
Mike Smith
8 months ago
Reply to  Bearddevil

That’s my concern. As another commenter noted, I can’t see it being any cheaper than a Wrangler 4xe. If you’re generous and assume a cost to Stellantis of $150/kWh of battery pack, just the upcharge for the battery size increase from 25 to 92 kWh is minimum $10,000, probably twice that for margin. They list a base ‘Sport S 4xe’ MSRP at $50k, so that points to $70k+. A base Tradesman sells for $42k, just adding the 92 kWh battery at 2x material cost also lands at a $70k base price.
I’d be curious what design requirement drove a battery that size, because if it was me I’d size the battery to give right around 50 miles electric range to cover most commutes, then run the motor the rest of the time for long trips. That would knock the price premium down over the ICE only vehicle by ~60%. I would also add the feature where there is a clutch to a single speed transmission so that the range extender drives the truck as if it was in top gear when you’re on the highway (like the Outlander and Accord PHEVs do it) to cut out the electrical losses when most of your load is aerodynamic drag and rolling resistance, which the electric motor’s can’t recover.

Bearddevil
Bearddevil
8 months ago
Reply to  Mike Smith

Good points there. I also wonder why it doesn’t seem like they’re going to be using LFP chamistry for this. It might cut into the battery capacity for size, but I would think that in this application, where range anxiety isn’t a thing, the advantages of cost, durability, and ability to be recharged more often would really be clutch here.

Boxing Pistons
Boxing Pistons
8 months ago
Reply to  Mike Smith

Well put, and I think you’re spot-on with your pricing projections. A much smaller battery is in order.

Scoutdude
Scoutdude
8 months ago
Reply to  Mike Smith

I agree that a smaller battery is better for a number of reasons. The problem with doing a direct drive set up is that the chassis and drive system was designed primarily for the pure EV version and its monster battery. So no good way to input engine torque to the drive unit(s) or to get it there.

DadBod
DadBod
8 months ago
Reply to  Bearddevil

Well there are idiots buyers paying $90K for loaded V8 RAMs so it’s not anything new

Boxing Pistons
Boxing Pistons
8 months ago

I have fond memories of the 2nd gen Ramcharger. A laborer at the plumbing company I worked at during summer breaks in college had a tired old “Prospector” spec. He won “ugliest truck” at the county fair one year. Haha. That thing was rough, but a good runner!

Boxing Pistons
Boxing Pistons
8 months ago

I’m not getting too excited until I see the price which will not be pretty. While it is great that they gave it real range, that battery pack is enormous for a plug-in and kinda defeats the purpose. The whole point of a plug-in to me is to give the vehicle enough EV range to do the day-to-day stuff (50ish miles) while utilizing a much smaller battery pack. This has a full-size battery pack comparable to a dedicated EV, 2 motors, and a gas engine. It is literally 2 whole power trains in one with all the associated costs. It fits the Chrysler mantra well: “more is more”. You’ll pay dearly for it.

Frankencamry
Frankencamry
8 months ago
Reply to  Boxing Pistons

But this is a 50 mile range PHEV if you’re towing a trailer at the upper end of its spec. Trucks are rough in that regard, because they have to plan for a much worse maximum use case.

Boxing Pistons
Boxing Pistons
8 months ago
Reply to  Frankencamry

Fair point. However, towing is more of a fringe case for most folks. Personally, I’d be 100% fine with a cheaper/lighter rig that can get me to/from work every weekday on electrons alone and have it work in hybrid mode for the handful of times I need to tow anything more than 10 miles per year.

Drew
Drew
8 months ago

I’ve been looking at downsizing my pickup, but this could tempt me to stick with a full-size, if the price is right.

It probably won’t be, but we’ll see.

Robot Turds
Robot Turds
8 months ago

Looks great, sounds great…. but if “normal” full sized trucks now cost $70k I cannot imagine how much this is going to cost. I assume around $100k? If so then hardly anyone will buy them.

Ben
Ben
8 months ago
Reply to  Robot Turds

“Normal” full-size trucks do not cost $70k, even these days. That’s well into the luxury trim levels, albeit not the very top luxury trim levels.

DadBod
DadBod
8 months ago
Reply to  Ben

agreed, F150 XL doesn’t break 50 until you add 4WD. These days it’s not the sticker but the borrowing costs that inflate the price of a vehicle.

Automotiveflux
Automotiveflux
8 months ago

Wow looks great, hopefully it doesn’t start at 80k haha. I’d actually like to see a de tuned version with like 400hp? to lower that barrier of entry

Boxing Pistons
Boxing Pistons
8 months ago
Reply to  Automotiveflux

It won’t make much difference to cost if they de-tune it. All the money is in the battery. I’d rather see an EV range of 100 miles which is still more than enough for any daily driving if they could cut substantial weight with a more reasonable battery pack.

sentinelTk
sentinelTk
8 months ago

I reeeeeeeeallllly want a technical write-up about the decision to go range extender from DT or one of our other engineer-minded friends covering the benefits and compromises. At first this seems like a no-brainer but then why is only Dodge using this approach so far?

Data
Data
8 months ago
Reply to  sentinelTk

My guess would be be cause everyone is making a hard push into the EV space and hybrids have been passed over. Even Toyota, who may have the best hybrid on the market, has failed to hybrid all the things.

sentinelTk
sentinelTk
8 months ago
Reply to  Data

Point being, this isn’t even a traditional hybrid. It’s an EV with a gas range extender, which is unique in this segment.

Jeff Hager
Jeff Hager
8 months ago
Reply to  sentinelTk

I drive a GM Voltec platform car. I do realize that my platform can drive the wheels directly from the gasoline engine but it’s mostly a EREV. Isn’t this RAM mostly the same idea?

Skurdnee
Skurdnee
8 months ago
Reply to  sentinelTk

baffling that GM had a Silverado [mild] Hybrid in 2010 but never followed up with a proper range extended truck

DadBod
DadBod
8 months ago
Reply to  Skurdnee

I recall at the time that they didn’t market it for shit, then threw up their hands because “nobody wants a hybrid truck!”

Captain Muppet
Captain Muppet
8 months ago
Reply to  sentinelTk

The benefits are: huge range, zero emissions on demand, no multi-speed gearbox, no prop shaft cutting through the middle of the battery, peak efficiency from your ICE without your user mucking it up with throttle demand.

The downsides are: packaging nightmare (unless you stick it in something huge, or have a small battery and ICE).

It’s relatively easy to slip a tiny battery and either a pancake motor or an E-axle on to an ICE car to make a HEV/PHEV, but it’s much more grief slipping a gas tank, ICE and a red hot exhaust system in to an EV to make a REEV.

I’ve worked on REEVs for four manufacturers and none of them got past prototype stage. The NVH issues when the range extender kicks in are terrible. The tech specs are great, but the driving experience on a test drive is unlikely to make it seem worth the effort/cost. On a short drive it’s a heavier, more expensive EV. Executives like low risk obvious decisions.

Gubbin
Gubbin
8 months ago
Reply to  sentinelTk

I was really surprised to see them going with a series hybrid here, but if they can make the numbers work, yay. In the past, series hybrids were less efficient, but if you treat it as a range-extended EV your EPA numbers look good, and most commuta-truck buyers don’t care about fuel efficiency.

UnseenCat
UnseenCat
8 months ago
Reply to  Gubbin

I think part of it may be about weight. Series hybrids may lose the transmission, but still gain weight with the addition of a generator and battery pack plus traction motors. But thanks to progress in EVs, we’ve developed lighter, stronger motors, and battery pack energy density has improved allowing better weight-vs-range options. So we’ve probably come to the point where it’s doable, at least in the truck sector. Maybe not cars and SUV’s yet.

DadBod
DadBod
8 months ago
Reply to  Gubbin

They care when about fuel efficiency when gas prices spike, or at least they care enough to whine about it

Shinynugget
Shinynugget
8 months ago

Love the idea and sounds like it could be a perfect truck.
Holding my breath on Chrysler/Stellanti’s execution of a complicated powertrain.

No Kids, Just Bikes
No Kids, Just Bikes
8 months ago
Reply to  Shinynugget

Yeah. Woe to those first in line for something this complicated from Stellantis.

Who is the Leader
Who is the Leader
8 months ago

The original Ramcharger was a Dodge. This one is a Ram. So it should be called the Ram Dodgecharger.

. . . . Wait. . . . . . . Oh. . . . . . . That’s why. . . . . . . .

R53 Lifer
R53 Lifer
8 months ago

Going, going, gone! Adios senior pelota!

Thomas Metcalf
Thomas Metcalf
8 months ago

If I needed a truck, I think this would be the one I would go for. Very cool. Good for Chrylser for making this beast.

Canopysaurus
Canopysaurus
8 months ago

Excellent fusion of technologies and attractive design, too. Way too big for my needs, but if they ever build a baby Ramcharger, I’m there.

06dak
06dak
8 months ago

Kinda surprised this doesn’t pack the turbo 4 cylinder instead of the Pentestar, honestly. Seems like it could be more efficient under gas load and package better, though I guess it’s longer than the 6cyl so maybe that’s why? Or the turbo 4cyl is just more expensive?

488Magnum
488Magnum
8 months ago
Reply to  06dak

Likely reliability and cost. The pentastar is a great engine that is fairly simple with a solid track record. Plus it already comes in the truck so less redesign work. N/A will always be cheaper and more reliable than forced induction.

Data
Data
8 months ago
Reply to  06dak

Because full size truck buyers may balk at a 4 banger under the hood, even if it’s not powering the drive wheels.

Amschroeder5
Amschroeder5
8 months ago
Reply to  Data

This is the true answer, unfortunately (MUH TRUCKS).

Because the pentastar v6 is a terrible choice for an efficient hybrid.

Cool Dave
Cool Dave
8 months ago

A logical system to make what’s probably the best looking truck from the Big 3 actually work as an EV AND a truck? Personally not looking into one but they better sell a metric crapload of these..

Jim Stock
Jim Stock
8 months ago

I love the idea, this is the setup for locomotives and ships.
I currently own 2 cars with the 3.6 and it is a good engine.

I would assume that the next-gen Wrangler will have a similar setup.

Rippstik
Rippstik
8 months ago

I love the idea, but in a Toyota. C’mon Toyota, can we please have a Tundra Prime?

Johnny Anxiety
Johnny Anxiety
8 months ago

I hope they don’t screw this up because this is the kind of Electric/Hybrid truck I’ve been wanting. It looks great too.

Angrycat Meowmeow
Angrycat Meowmeow
8 months ago

the top dog Tungsten model is mighty enticing.

I’m sure it weighs and costs like it’s made out of Tungsten, too.

It is pretty cool though. You’d have to pay me to drive a pickup, but if I had a need for one I’d hope I could afford this one.

Thomas Metcalf
Thomas Metcalf
8 months ago

Tungsten is known for being very heavy (high density) I am sure this truck will weigh quite a bit too.

PresterJohn
PresterJohn
8 months ago

Wow they are going to sell a shitload of these! The fact that Ford or GM haven’t done this yet is almost criminal.

JDE
JDE
8 months ago
Reply to  PresterJohn

Fully dependant on price to be honest. Even with the completely paid for tooling on the Pentastar, the cost of the big battery and a decent sized motor is likely not going to be cheaper than full BEV. the 4Xe with pretty tiny little batteries and around 25 miles of EV only driving is around 70K in a Wrangler Rubicon. That is not cheaper than a basic pentastar rubicon.

Church
Church
8 months ago
Reply to  JDE

And yet they sell a comically amount of 4Xe wranglers. Wasn’t it the best selling hybrid last quarter or something? I swear there was even an article about here on the autopian.

JDE
JDE
8 months ago
Reply to  Church

I would want a 4Xe if I was going to daily a Wrangler. it seems to be a good compromise, but the price would still make me take a few additional looks and to be honest with the 392 available for only a bit more, I would probably have ended up in the ridiculously unnecessary Big v8 wrangler, just because it was there. That not being an option anymore and with even Ice prices jumping even more, I could see the seemingly high prices meaning a bit less as middle class wages adjust even more for inflation.

PresterJohn
PresterJohn
8 months ago
Reply to  JDE

I’d agree if we were talking about crossovers, but the truck market is already so insane I’m not sure people are particularly price-sensitive.

Ben
Ben
8 months ago
Reply to  JDE

It doesn’t have to be cheaper because it’s literally miles more useful than a full BEV truck. This is the first plug-in truck I can even consider buying because it would actually get my camper to most of my destinations, which a full BEV can’t even come close to right now.

JDE
JDE
8 months ago
Reply to  Ben

Price will dictate Maverick level of shitloads VS the current volume of Ram trucks. if the price is too high and people get wind of the 6.6 GM coming without the AFM/DFM failure installed, then I suspect the last of the V8 Holdouts will be going GM or even 5.0 Ford for a while.

Michael Beranek
Michael Beranek
8 months ago

Thomas, you missed the true origin of the Ramcharger name. It was a drag-racing team that ran Dodges back in the ’60’s. They dominated drag strips all over the northeast with wedges and hemis.
I learned this from Bill Stephens, so… watch more Mecum.

JDE
JDE
8 months ago

they were known for doing odd things to get there too(Super long Runner Cross ram dual quads), so I imagine that is what this is trying to equate to.

Arch Duke Maxyenko
Arch Duke Maxyenko
8 months ago

It was also the name of the 413 Max Wedge

UnseenCat
UnseenCat
8 months ago

I’m interested. I’m hoping there will be a 2500 version in the future, because I tend to make my trucks work hard and I have high expectations for durability and safety because I’m acclimated to medium and heavy-duty trucks. (It’s not just payload capacity, it’s about overall robustness of the frame and parts, and larger brakes that are safer for even lighter, routine loading.)

The battery range is perfectly adequate for daily-driving purposes and runs to the nearest lumberyard or equipment rental shop.

Nitpick: Stellantis, can we talk about that stupid shift selector knob? I’ve just never liked using it. It’s overly fiddly at just the wrong moment. Why not go back to a traditional column shift lever, or a lever on the dash or console? Or even pushbuttons which have a heritage in Chrysler products, and also appear on heavy-duty Allison automatic transmission installs in trucks and equipment.

JDE
JDE
8 months ago
Reply to  UnseenCat

Ford made the godzilla gasser, Chevy has the 6.6 L8T Gasser(sans DFM and the rest of that nonsense), dodge killed the 6.4 and has nothing except the 500HP Hurricane six, guess we will see how that works out in the end for work trucks.

UnseenCat
UnseenCat
8 months ago
Reply to  JDE

As a lover of trucks and heavy equipment, I’ve always appreciated the diesel-electric powertrain which is what this is a variation of. ICE drives a generator, and the electricity goes straight to traction motors with no mechanical transmission losses in the way. Here, we add a battery for even more efficiency. I’ll take this over any of the big gassers and if they can build one as a 2500, I’ll seriously consider trading in my old Cummins-powered Dodge.

JDE
JDE
8 months ago
Reply to  UnseenCat

I mean it has worked for locomotives for a long time now. except of course 2 stroke diesels and the generator is directly connected tot he motors, so no efficiency lost converting electricity into battery storage and then sucked off the battery later. I think you misunderstand the lost electricity in the multiple conversions though. Not to mention the lost efficiency lugging the big batteries around.

Gubbin
Gubbin
8 months ago
Reply to  UnseenCat

That’s something I’m always wondering about. They keep increasing payload and tow ratings for half-ton trucks but I wonder how much of that is “well, you could do it once or twice and get away with it…” vs. “5T on a gooseneck trailer every day.”

UnseenCat
UnseenCat
8 months ago
Reply to  Gubbin

My concerns exactly. I’ve never owned a “modern” (90s or later) half-ton.

Regulations changed, and I was leery of the initial run of new half-tons compared to my F150 “heavy half” I had at the time. They’ve continued to be more of a big SUV platform variant more than a work-truck platform from what I’ve seen. Work trucks using heavier frames, bigger brakes, more robust wheel and axle bearings, heavier springs — those all went into the 250/2500 ranges.

Not that “1500” style half-tons aren’t still good vehicles, but their focus is more on “weekend warrior” activities and occasionally towing a utility trailer or camper. And despite the advertising, the payload and tow ratings seem to be a bit inflated in terms of what it’s doing to driveline component wear and brakes — emphasizing occasional use.

My use case is a bit different — I expect my truck to be overbuilt sufficiently to last a long time with personal use. I don’t have to haul heavy loads daily like a contractor, but because I do most of my own work around the house and property, I don’t want to think twice about loading the bed up to the rails with lumber or drywall or flooring, or hitching up the box trailer loaded with the entire contents of a wooden shed kit, or loading up a large, heavy 90s-era garden tractor and implements to go do work at my elderly mom’s house, or load up the trailer with furniture for moving, or rent a car transporter and go move a car… There’s always some drop-what-I’m-doing and load-the-truck-to-the-gills task where I need to get it done now and I don’t have time to worry about splitting loads and trips or if the truck has been adequately prepared to really load up.

I could rely on my old heavy-half trucks — the ’83 F-150 and an ’85 C-15 to get the job done without complaining. Nowadays I have a 2000 Cummins-powered Dodge 2500 (with a manual transmission!!) that I won’t trade until something genuinely better comes along. The only other vehicle I could trust the same way was a Land Rover Discovery 1 pulling a trailer. But old Land Rovers were similarly overbuilt for exactly the same use case — just to be always available as a beast of burden, but still be efficient to use unloaded as a daily driver. I think that’s something that’s been lost in the mass-market 1500 range.

Gubbin
Gubbin
8 months ago
Reply to  UnseenCat

Yeah, the F-250 is currently in the shop getting mid 4-figures worth of engine work right now, because I expect it’ll have to last as long as our (currently young) horses do.

Mike S
Mike S
8 months ago
Reply to  UnseenCat

I’m not a fan of the shift selector rotating knob either. I have one on my new-to-me 300S and it’s awkward to me- part of me is worried that I’ll be reaching for the volume knob (only like 3-4” away!) and accidentally put her in P on the freeway. I don’t want her shitting out the transmission like she just ate $30 worth of Taco Bell!

Ben
Ben
8 months ago
Reply to  Mike S

I haven’t tried it, for obvious reasons, but I’d be shocked if the computer would let you shift into park at speed even if you did turn the wrong knob.

Rust Buckets
Rust Buckets
8 months ago
Reply to  UnseenCat

Well good news: See those 8 lug 18″ wheels? This is literally a 3/4 ton, with 3/4 ton brakes and “3/4 ton” suspension. The frame is also literally 3/4 ton to hold that big ol battery.

Fred Pinto
Fred Pinto
8 months ago

With batteries pricing rising due to the high lithium demand, and given that this thing packs a big one, I would say that this truck will take us one step closer to the edge

Alexk98
Alexk98
8 months ago
Reply to  Fred Pinto

But at the same time compared to full BEV only trucks, its only about half the size for its battery, meaning it saves around 100kWh+ of batteries, and at current pricing of around $140-150 per kWh, that’s pushing 15k in savings, which while much of that is lost to an extra motor and an engine under the hood, should bring it in somewhere south of Ram REV/Silverado EV/Ford Lightning prices for a truck that is arguable far far more usable, which I see as a huge win.

My 0.02 Cents
My 0.02 Cents
8 months ago
Reply to  Fred Pinto

Lithium is down 68% this year and still falling.

https://tradingeconomics.com/commodity/lithium

Fred Pinto
Fred Pinto
8 months ago
Reply to  My 0.02 Cents

guys, it was, it was just a pun related to the main image of the post, I know next to nothing related to mineral’s markets and stuff

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