Home » The Maserati MCXtrema Is A Bonkers 730-Horsepower ’70s-Inspired Trackday Toy

The Maserati MCXtrema Is A Bonkers 730-Horsepower ’70s-Inspired Trackday Toy

Track Only Maserati MCXtrema Ts
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In many ways, Monterey Car Week is a festival of excess. And what’s more excessive than a track day-only supercar special? This time, it’s the trident’s turn to enter the ring with the Maserati MCXtrema, a 730-horsepower flat-nose, dual-cockpit, track-only car you and I may never actually see in the metal.

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Vidframe Min Top
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Under the skin, the Maserati MCXtrema is fundamentally a hardened MC20 supercar. However, power’s been bumped to 730 horsepower, a full 109 horsepower more than the already rapid MC20 supercar offers.

Not that anyone complained of the MC20 being slow. Oh, and it weighs 551 pounds less than its tamer, roadgoing sibling. Yep, that’s serious. To harness all this unbridled aggression, Maserati has gone with a six-speed sequential transaxle with a mechanical locking differential, proper racecar stuff.

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So, you want to make a throwback supercar. What do you do? You could come over all ’80s, with folded-paper styling and borrowed nostalgia. Fortunately, Maserati didn’t have post cars in the ’80s, because the brand went bust in 1975 and had no money to develop flights of fancy. The Biturbo was a rebuilding car, remember.

As it turns out, that’s not the worst thing to happen, because we could’ve easily ended up with something resembling the unfortunate Countach re-hash from the other year. Instead, Maserati reached for an infinitely cooler supercar decade than the ’80s — the 1970s.

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Yes, the decade of massive pubes, distrust in American leadership, oil crises, and shit polyester clothing gave us some awesome supercars, like the Maserati Bora and Maserati Merak. These flat yet curvaceous instruments of violence are gorgeous, and Maserati remembers how bewitching they were. The MCXtrema is pointy without looking like Edward Scissorhands, it’s svelte without looking petite.

Sure, this track day special is basically a new nose and tail wrapped around familiar MC20 bones, but what a nose and tail this thing has. The tension over the arches, the relatively clean surfacing, the old-school-low front end, it’s pretty much all brilliant.

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Inside the Maserati MCXtrema, the cockpit looks like a Casio G-Shock on acid, all yellow and blue with circles and stripes. There’s a carbon fiber pod encasing the driver, yet there’s still more interior room outside the pod in the space where a passenger can potentially sit. Yo dawg, I heard you like interiors. Outside of the reinforced driver cell, materials are spartan but artful, purposeful, and a great deal more sculptural than in most stripped-out track day specials.

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So, want to buy an MCXtrema? Unfortunately, you can’t. Not now, and possibly not ever. See, Maserati has taken a page out of Ferrari’s playbook and hand-chosen all 62 MCXtrema customers. These cars will, for the most part, remain in Italy under lock and key until an event arises where customers may have the privilege to use their cars. That’s an enormous shame because the MCXtrema is both beautiful and special.

Sure, it may share part of its name with a Chevrolet pickup truck and sound like a secret menu item McDonald’s doesn’t want you to know about, but it’s a throwback done right, with just the right pinch of inspiration drawn to show heritage without being heavy-handed.

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(Photo credits: Maserati)

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Tim Connors
Tim Connors
9 months ago

Fancy autoweek has made this site boring. I don’t care about toys for the rich. Please get back to your core content:

97 hp hatchbacks.
DT risking tetnaus to bring an unloved vehice back to life because it is a holy grail.
Mercedes hooning a basic commuter through the wilds while picking up trash.
Torch buzzing to the beach with his kids in something putzy and weird.

I wanna read about weird shitty cars.

I give no fucks about the ultra rich wasting the kind of money that would be generational wealth to 99% of the population.

Andreas8088
Andreas8088
9 months ago

I’ll stick to the McNugget. It’s more in my price range.

Last edited 9 months ago by Andreas8088
Wolfpack57
Wolfpack57
9 months ago

I wonder if this thing meets homologation requirements for any series? It reminds me of the Porsche 935 visually and I’m wondering if it’s for a similar purpose.

Angrycat Meowmeow
Angrycat Meowmeow
9 months ago

If you offered me a track day in one of these and a cheap used car, and said I could keep the one I had more fun in, I’d probably be driving a used Miata home.

Toecutter
Toecutter
9 months ago

That is quite an interior. Normally, I don’t generally care what the interior looks like(I prefer bare, for weight reduction), but this space capsule certainly caught my attention.

Last edited 9 months ago by Toecutter
niceladybadjeep
niceladybadjeep
9 months ago
Reply to  Toecutter

Is there a separate seat for each arse-cheek?

FiveOhNo
FiveOhNo
9 months ago

“These cars will, for the most part, remain in Italy under lock and key until an event arises where customers may have the privilege to use their cars.”

Wait, you mean you get hand-chosen by a stuffy, stodgy company for the “privilege” of owning a vehicle you can’t even bloody drive until they let you? WHAT?!

I can’t tell if I’m too smart or too stupid to own these types of cars.

SLM
SLM
9 months ago
Reply to  FiveOhNo

I think it’s more like buying the privilege of having a car maintained and kept in a safe place, and having it ready on the side of the track when you decide.

Rafael
Rafael
9 months ago
Reply to  FiveOhNo

It seems to me that you buy a membership, not a car. Won’t be surprise if your contract says the car still belongs to Maserati and you rent it for € 0.

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