Home » The Nissan Z Nismo Costs $66,085, Here’s What You Could Get Instead

The Nissan Z Nismo Costs $66,085, Here’s What You Could Get Instead

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More is more, right? Take the 2024 Nissan Z Nismo, for example. It takes Nissan’s retro-cool sports coupe and gives it a whole lot more of absolutely everything. More power to the tune of 420, more standard gears since the only transmission option is a nine-speed automatic, more chassis bracing, more aggressive brake pads, more performance-oriented tires, and more starchiness in its suspension. A blunderbuss of go-fast goodies has been fired at the Z Nismo, but this triple cheeseburger deluxe of Nissan sports cars comes at a serious price that could make customers think twice.

Are you ready for the big one? This automatic-only top-shelf Z Nismo stickers for $66,085 including a $1,095 freight charge.

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That’s a whole lot of money for a car riding on a platform that’s old enough to drink, and it plunges the hi-po Z Nismo into a cut-throat area of the market brimming with serious performance cars. What are these performance cars, exactly? I’m glad you asked.

BMW M2: $64,195

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I bet you didn’t see this one coming. It’s hard to believe that a full-fat rear-wheel-drive M-car with a manual gearbox is cheaper than the quickest new Z, but welcome to 2023. While the new M2’s styling is a matter of taste, its $64,195 price tag including a $995 freight charge slides in under Nismo Z pricing, and the Bimmer itself has a whole lot going for it. It’s likely the last new BMW with a manual gearbox, it has rear seats, it has a reasonably-sized trunk, and did I mention that it’s freaking quick?

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A total of 453 horsepower from a three-liter twin-turbocharged S58 inline-six engine means that the M2 doesn’t hang about in a straight line. Even with the six-speed manual gearbox, it’s likely to match pace with Nissan’s latest turbocharged terror. Oh, and it handles too, provided you take it as the two-door sports sedan it is. Sure, the new M2 doesn’t want to wag its tail as much as the previous model, but it’s an impressive daily driver that can still go like the dickens.

Ford Mustang Dark Horse: $60,865

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The M2 is all well and good, but what if you’re thirsting for the automotive equivalent of Natty Light rather than Gewürztraminer? The Camaro is dying soon, Challenger order books are closed, and there’s only one option for front-engined V8 fun at this price point. Thankfully, it’s an exceptionally quick one. The 2024 Ford Mustang Dark Horse sports a sticker price of $60,865 including a $1,595 freight charge. That’s $5,220 cheaper than a Nismo Z for a 500-horsepower V8-powered naturally-aspirated sports coupe with a Tremec six-speed manual transmission and all the high-falutin’ go-fast gizmos you could possibly want.

However, in the immortal words of Billy Mays, “But wait, there’s more.” The pricing gulf between a Nismo Z and a base Dark Horse is so great that you could tick the box for the $4,995 handling package to achieve price parity, and that comes with all sorts of goodies. I’m talking about magnetorheological dampers, adjustable front strut hats, a wicked spoiler, and staggered 305/30R19 front, 315/30R19 rear Pirelli P Zero Trofeo RS 180-treadwear trackday tires. I’m not a betting man, but I have a strange suspicion that a properly-equipped Dark Horse would make mincemeat of a Nismo Z around the right track. Oh, and if that’s not your cup of tea, just think of the noises from the Coyote V8.

Chevrolet Corvette 1LT:  $67,895

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While we’re on the subject of “coulda had a V8,” the base-model Chevrolet Corvette is still cheaper than you might expect despite substantial price hikes over the past few years. It now starts at $67,895 including a $1,595 freight charge, which is a damn good deal if you aren’t looking to track it. With creamy ride quality, the ability to rip off zero-to-60 runs in around three seconds, and a roof that lifts out manually, it’s an astonishing amount of car for the money.

Will the Vette keep up with a Nismo Z in the bends? It depends on how tight they are, given the safe understeer dialed into the Vette’s street alignment settings. It also probably won’t feel as quick as the Z because it relies so heavily on fat rear tires, rear-biased weight distribution, and excellent launch control to achieve those attention-grabbing zero-to-60 mph times. However, it’s still a supercar for the upper middle class, with panache and performance on par with six-figure machinery. Ladies, gentlemen, and the people who don’t give a fuck, start your checkbooks.

Porsche 718 Cayman: $69,950

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On the face of things, paying more money than a Nismo Z for a slower car seems like a daft idea. The perceived prestige of the Porsche brand and social climber connotations that come with an absolutely base 718 Cayman make it seem even dafter. However, cars aren’t just about acceleration figures and spec sheet banter because cars aren’t driven on paper. Sure, once you include a $1,650 freight charge, the 718 Cayman come out to $69,950, or $3,865 more than a Nismo Z, but the Porsche should offer an entirely different kind of sports car experience.

While I haven’t driven the Nismo Z yet, I’ve driven the Performance model and owned a stiffened FM-platform car on sticky rubber. I’m sure the Nismo Z is awesome, but it’s also hard to get around a curb weight of 3,704 pounds and the lack of a manual transmission option. In contrast, the base 718 Cayman gets a six-speed manual gearbox and a curb weight of 2,943 pounds — that’s 761 pounds less than what the Z weighs. As a result, these mid-engined Porsches scythe where FM cars bludgeon, and a low polar moment of inertia certainly helps. Plus, Porsche parts support is famous for being excellent in the long run, and you probably won’t end up with a Rogue loaner car should you take your Porsche in for servicing. The perks of luxury, am I right?

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It Better Be Good

2024 Nismo Z 2

With competition like this, the 2024 Nissan Z Nismo has to be on its A-game if it wants to steal sales from the likes of BMW, Ford, and Porsche. Even with a niche audience fascinated by all things Z, Nissan will crave conquest sales just like all manufacturers do. If the Z Nismo fixes the standard car’s vagueness, might it be worth $66,085? Possibly, but I’d have a hard time walking into a Nissan dealership when I know that BMW will sell me a six-speed manual coupe for less. Then again, maybe you feel differently. Let me know in the comments below what new performance car you’d buy for around $66,000.

(Photo credits: Nissan, BMW, Ford, Chevrolet, Porsche)

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Pointy Deity
Pointy Deity
4 months ago

For what the new Nismo Z costs I’d rather get a new Miata for the street, an already-built Spec Z for the track, and a tow rig. Instead of paying the inevitable added dealer markup, take that $ and use it on consumables and registration fees for a year or 2.

Pedro
Pedro
4 months ago

I’d rather have the Nismo if those were the only cars left in the world. Probably never buy a gas car again, but if I did it would either be a Citroen DS, or a Nissan GTR. Hey my life, my poor judgement.

HOT_HATCH
HOT_HATCH
4 months ago

Isn’t the platform of this thing based on a car that debuted 10 years ago that was based on a car that debuted 10 years before that?

Your comment about the service experience is a perfect example of why no one will buy this except for pure Nissan fanboys. If I spend what will likely be 70k+ when the dust settles I want to be driven home from the Porsche dealer in a Cayenne, ass being cooled and massaged. Not given the dollar airport rental experience in a Sentra that smells like ozone and feet.

David C
David C
4 months ago

I recently bought a modified 280Z for around half the cost of the new Nismo Z. I wasn’t expecting much from the first iteration of the new Nismo Z, and glad I was proven correct in my assumptions. Also glad I didn’t buy a Proto Z when released as Z prices have come down locally here in New Zealand and I’ll wait a couple of years for a better price before potentially buying one

Cheap Bastard
Cheap Bastard
4 months ago

You could also get 33 dying LEAFS for a total. EV range of 825 miles!

Anoos
Anoos
4 months ago

Do $66k shoppers want to spend that at a Nissan dealership?

Buyers for this have likely owned at least one up-market / luxury brand vehicle. I don’t think they’ll like being treated like the Altima buyers financing for 84 months with a negative equity trade-in.

V10omous
V10omous
4 months ago
Reply to  Anoos

There are pros and cons to buying an expensive/flagship vehicle from a mainstream brand.

-The dealership experience is mixed, as you say. Buying my Viper was much more like buying a Caravan than a Mercedes or Porsche. I don’t personally mind the negotiations, so this isn’t such a negative to me, but I can see why some wouldn’t appreciate it.

-The service experience is very risky. If you have warranty work, you’re taking your car’s life in your hands when you bring it in to a place with poorly paid techs. For Vipers at least, FCA had/has special techs that were the only ones allowed to drive or work on Vipers. Not sure if other brands have something like this for their flagships (probably GT-R only at Nissan).

-Parts and manufacturer support is generally good though. Lots of parts are shared with more popular vehicles, ensuring serviceability well into the future.

Anoos
Anoos
4 months ago
Reply to  V10omous

Is this particular car awesome enough in some way that I’d pass on a Supra, M2, a slightly used Porsche or whatever $60k buys on Bring a Trailer this week?

I feel like the GTR was awesome enough to bring some buyers who would not have considered Nissan onto their lots. It was special, had a lot of hype behind it and delivered at lot of performance value at ~$70k. This Nismo Z looks pretty much like its $40k sibling. Less special.

V10omous
V10omous
4 months ago
Reply to  Anoos

Oh, I definitely agree, just responding to your point about buying an expensive car at a regular dealership.

Toecutter
Toecutter
4 months ago

Every single one of these cars is massively overweight, including the Cayman.

I’d rather get a Miata and mod the engine to have 3x the horsepower. It would run circles around all of the above on a track, cost less money, and use less fuel.

Noahwayout
Noahwayout
4 months ago
Reply to  Toecutter

In what world can you make a 543hp Miata that runs on pump gas, idles at a light, and won’t shred the transmission in like a month?

Toecutter
Toecutter
4 months ago
Reply to  Noahwayout

I never said it wouldn’t destroy the rest of its running gear, or that the engine would last long. 🙂

Even if it had, say, 250 horsepower, and not 500+, it would still go quite nicely and be reliable… enough.

Noahwayout
Noahwayout
4 months ago
Reply to  Toecutter

Realistically speaking, a 250hp Miata requires a base Miata ($29k) plus a turbo kit ($7,520). And since you can’t increase the go without the stop, you’ll need bigger brakes ($1400) and high performance tires ($1000+).

Things are adding up quickly… It’s easy to see how you could have $40-50k in a car that might have lower resale value than had you just left it stock (you’ll definitely not get your money out) and without the refinement and reliability of any of the cars listed above.

No hate on a Miata but even a 250hp Miata ain’t smokin’ a BMW M2 that holds the Nürburgring record for compacts. The quickest Miata around the ring did so with.. a 3.6L V6 from a Camaro.

Toecutter
Toecutter
4 months ago
Reply to  Noahwayout

Imagine if that turbo kit was mass produced by Mazda and was a stock option. It wouldn’t be nearly as costly an add-on then. And it could certainly be done if an OEM like Mazda really wanted to.

The cars listed above are also so porky they have difficulty getting out of their own way. They corner very well on paper, and on flattish tracks like Nurburgring. But put them on an incline, or some narrow hilly/windy canyon road somewhere, and things won’t work out so well for them. Lack thereof, there is no substitution for weight.

Last edited 4 months ago by Toecutter
Noahwayout
Noahwayout
4 months ago
Reply to  Toecutter

Go look at pictures of the Nürburgring. It’s 154 turns through the hilly German countryside. 3-12 people die on it every year. It’s not flat and it’s not easy.

M2 is 0-60 in 3.8 seconds and 1/4 mile in 12 seconds. I don’t know what to say if you think that is “difficulty getting out of [it’s] own way.”

Miata is a a cool sports car but it’s simply too small and compromised for most people’s daily needs. Even the Cayman has more space for groceries or a weekend getaway.

Toecutter
Toecutter
4 months ago
Reply to  Noahwayout

I know it’s not flat and it has plenty of curves. But how many sections or it are 15-25% gradients? Moderate hills with elevation changes of a few tens of feet are one thing. It does have the Steilstrecke, at least, which is a great hill to test, but most of the track is a lot less punishing. Steep gradients on a windy mountain road that change elevation by hundreds of feet at a time are another thing altogether. Imagine Steilstrecke repeating itself 20-30 times in one drive, and what that will do to a two-ton “sports car”.

“Difficulty getting out of its own way” referred to polar moment of inertia and direction of momentum, rather than straight-line acceleration capability. Lightweight cars have a much easier time changing their direction and with braking than heavier ones. These 4,000 lb “sports cars” are severely compromised in that department, no matter what kind of brakes, tires, and suspension you put on them, because there is no getting around Newton’s laws.

Noahwayout
Noahwayout
4 months ago
Reply to  Toecutter

This is what people who can’t afford a Nismo or M2 say.

Toecutter
Toecutter
4 months ago
Reply to  Noahwayout

I could buy one of those right now in full if I wanted. They don’t interest me and it would be a colossal waste of money. They’re too fat and thirsty. I like my cars to be light, nimble, overpowered, and aerodynamically slippery. Too bad TVR isn’t around. Until something comes onto the market that appeals to me, I have no choice but to stick with classic cars.

Maybe there will be a Radical SR1 in my future. It checks 3 out of 4 of those boxes.

Greg
Greg
4 months ago

it literally can’t be anywhere close to as good as those other cars, Nissan sucks already and then do this to their only cool car to guarantee it doesn’t do well.

C-ya later Nissan.

Óscar Morales Vivó
Óscar Morales Vivó
4 months ago

I’m guessing Audi closed the books on the RS3 and TTRS as well? Would have made for an interesting comparison.

Nsane In The MembraNe
Nsane In The MembraNe
4 months ago

The current RS3 is unobtainium. The production numbers are low and folks are willing to pay over sticker for them. I also personally think they’re ugly. There’s a bright green one in my area and the front end is a disaster because of all the black trim.

Last edited 4 months ago by Nsane In The MembraNe
Óscar Morales Vivó
Óscar Morales Vivó
4 months ago

In a few years we’re going to be looking back at the giant black grille era like we do the giant fins era. A trend that could work out in some cases, applied measuredly, but then got out of hand.

They could have just kept making the first gen TT (looks-wise) and we’d all be better for it. And I say that owning a 2nd gen.

Studdley
Studdley
4 months ago

You’re smoking dope if you think you can touch any of those cars for less than 75k.

Chartreuse Bison
Chartreuse Bison
4 months ago
Reply to  Studdley

But the Nismo Z will be marked up just as much if not more. Starting price is just for comparisons.

EVDesigner
EVDesigner
4 months ago

I can definitely get a 718 Cayman and M2 at sticker price even if I have to wait a bit. Nissan though? They’re so used to selling taking advantage of Altima buying customers that they’ll treat you the same.

Angular Banjoes
Angular Banjoes
4 months ago
Reply to  Studdley

I bought a G87 M2 for MSRP. It wasn’t easy, and I had to wait for a while, but it’s definitely possible.

3WiperB
3WiperB
4 months ago

The problem is, there are so many really good cars in the in mid 60’s that this gets lost. I’d be doing something with a manual if I’m trying to find something fun. If I’m forced to get something with an automatic for a fun car, I’d probably just go full electric. A few of the Autopians that went to the Detroit Auto Show this weekend can confirm that the BMW I4 M50 is scary fast and it’s around the same price point too.

Man With A Reliable Jeep
Man With A Reliable Jeep
4 months ago

If you could order one in Rosewood Metallic, base of base, and actually get it for what Nissan says you will, without TTL games, you’d be winning. The Z is drop dead gorgeous in that color with the graphite five spoke alloys.

Arch Duke Maxyenko
Arch Duke Maxyenko
4 months ago

But that gives you an open diff, which is sad :_(

Man With A Reliable Jeep
Man With A Reliable Jeep
4 months ago

🙁

Spyrius Robot
Spyrius Robot
4 months ago

As a Z fanboy, I’ll take the Z, thanks.

David Lorengo
David Lorengo
4 months ago

Why wasn’t the Supra included in this list? More people probably cross shop the Supra vs the Z than the Vette. Supra MSRP for the 3.0 is in the 63k range and the Supra vs Z is a classic match up.

TheFanciestCat
TheFanciestCat
4 months ago

I haven’t followed the Z much, but I remember lots of talk at launch about how it wasn’t designed for the track and was meant to be satisfying on real roads. That’s the kind of car where I don’t see much point in piling on factory performance and price. A mid tier model is probably the sweet spot. After that, you might as well move on to something like the Cayman because the Z was probably never the right fit.

Shooting Brake
Shooting Brake
4 months ago

I think the huge jump in price for the Nismo is the mothership trying to get a bigger slice of the mark up pie for themselves, just bake it in from the start.

David Lorengo
David Lorengo
4 months ago

My Mustang should be here in Feb. Looked at the M2 but couldn’t really get excited about it’s looks, kinda like those overplumped cartoon cars. Good luck finding a Vette selling for the prices in this article. Mustang was msrp – xplan.

Cerberus
Cerberus
4 months ago

Don’t care for these alternate options, but I would still take any of them over the NISMO.

Angrycat Meowmeow
Angrycat Meowmeow
4 months ago

M2 gets my vote

Nsane In The MembraNe
Nsane In The MembraNe
4 months ago

I’ve been eyeing the new M2 myself. I’m not in need of getting a new car and it’s going to be a hard to impossible to convince my wife that I need a coupe, but I still think it’s cool.

Angular Banjoes
Angular Banjoes
4 months ago

Do it. It’s the last non-electrified, manual, RWD M car. It’s a little bit heavy, and the gearing with the manual seems a bit off, but I love it. Seems like a lot of folks think it’s ugly (mostly previous-gen M2 owners), but it looks really good in person, and it gets a ton of attention.

Arch Duke Maxyenko
Arch Duke Maxyenko
4 months ago

Save $10k and get a Camaro 2SS 1LE with a manual while you still can.

Squirrelmaster
Squirrelmaster
4 months ago

I had the exact same thought when I read the headline, then skimmed the article and jumped right into the comments to make sure this thought had been captured. A+ to you, sir.

Nsane In The MembraNe
Nsane In The MembraNe
4 months ago

If the question is “track car” and the budget is $70,000 or less then 6th gen Camaro is always the answer. The main instructor at the track I go to has an SS ILE and even at 70% or so there isn’t much that keep up with him, and the ZL1 is straight looney bin fast. Those things put a lot of supercars to shame.

It’s a damn shame they’re going away. They’re incredible cars and yet no one seems to car. I think the sacrifices they force you to make as a daily turn a lot of folks off but I’m not going to hear any opinions about that car or platform from anyone who hasn’t driven one.

EmotionalSupportBMW
EmotionalSupportBMW
4 months ago

I still want a Z, even though Nissan has continued to deny me such pleasure via dealer marks-ups and sales people who would prefer I buy the Maxima on the lot because quote “It’s just as fast”. I watched the reviews this morning, and apparently Nismo improved the car a lot. But in no timeline should this car be that close to Corvette money. I’m a big Nissan and BMW guy. But even I would just embrace boomer culture and buy a Vette.

V10omous
V10omous
4 months ago

This is not unprecedented; in the mid 90s, a 300ZX (and Supra Turbo, RX7 etc) cost thousands more than a C4 and even a C5 Corvette.

Of course, there’s no comparing the performance gulf between a C4 to a C8 with that of a 300ZX to a 400Z.

EmotionalSupportBMW
EmotionalSupportBMW
4 months ago
Reply to  V10omous

To be fair, the Big Bubble 3 were better cars then c4. And by the the time of C5, pretty sure the Supra was the only one left in America.

Cerberus
Cerberus
4 months ago
Reply to  V10omous

That pricing also killed those cars. They keep trying to sell this one as a return to Z, but the original Z was a lot cheaper than a contemporary Corvette. It’s just another thing about this car says “ZX” other than much of the retro style.

Carbon Fiber Sasquatch
Carbon Fiber Sasquatch
4 months ago

The Z is just too expensive all around for what it is. It’s cool but between the 2 series, Mustang and Supra, I don’t see where the buyer for this car is.

Goof
Goof
4 months ago

I think the buyer is someone who wants a brand new car to genuinely feel more like a 20-year old car. The automatic hurts that tremendously, but the consistent thing I hear is because of the relative lack of refinement to newer platforms and chassis, is the Z, “feels older”, and for some — few, but some — that’s a positive thing.

I don’t disagree that it’s a very hard sell in this market, but the 370Z didn’t exactly push numbers. I think worldwide it might’ve sold under 100K total units in its entire run.

Initial reviews indicate that it’s better than the sum of its parts suggest. It’s much better behaved on road and on track than the base, but still, it’s a tough sell.

Last edited 4 months ago by Goof
Greg
Greg
4 months ago
Reply to  Goof

I am someone the older tech and feel appeals to. This price is super fucking high for something that doesn’t feel new or use a totally new car. This is a refresh even if they call it an all new design. And its fucking over 60k! There is NO REASON BUT GREED AND STUPIDITY.

I promise, I can wait three years and find one for 30k. These will drop like rocks.

Last edited 4 months ago by Greg
Jacob Rippey
Jacob Rippey
4 months ago

A swing and a miss. Any of the cars listed above are superior. There are also a number of used cars that would eat the Z’s lunch.

V10omous
V10omous
4 months ago

This isn’t even the most overpriced Nismo model!

You can buy a Huracan, an R8, a 911 Turbo S or GT3, or a McLaren Artura for the same (or less) as a GTR Nismo.

Nsane In The MembraNe
Nsane In The MembraNe
4 months ago
Reply to  V10omous

I forgot that that stupid thing exists…and people buy them too! I saw one at Cars and Coffee this summer. Imagine spending 200k on a goddamn NISSAN…

V10omous
V10omous
4 months ago

On the one hand, I know people who spent more than that on a Dodge. 🙂

On the other, the GT-R has always been the hyped car I’ve understood the least. I think it’s ugly, not a particularly good performer for its price anymore, and from my interactions with owners, seems to attract the kind of weird attention that I loathe. I wouldn’t be a buyer at $100K, let alone 200.

Nsane In The MembraNe
Nsane In The MembraNe
4 months ago

A Limp Bizkit reference when making a case for a Corvette is A+. Don’t forget the hot mommas, pimp daddies, and the people rolling their Caddies. Hopefully they’re rolling in Blackwing Caddies.

That being said I don’t think you can call a $70,000 car upper middle class. That’s about what the median American household takes home in an entire year and it’s very expensive, not to mention they’re still selling for way over sticker because people are morons.

The fact that Nissan thinks this early 2000s torque converter automatic only car with a fresh coat of paint is is worth $66,000 is absolutely hilarious, and you’re only talking about new cars. This is firmly in used ZL1 territory and that car will absolutely annihilate it. It comes in manual too, technically seats 4, and can even be had with a roof that goes down.

Speaking of which, this is also Z4 M40i territory, certified 911/higher end Boxster/Cayman territory, CT4V BW territory, dear god. The hubris is astounding. Who the hell do they think is going to buy these things? All these Japanese manufacturers have a very “whatever idiot, it has our name on it so you’ll buy it” attitude towards these enthusiast specific cars but the bubble is going to pop sooner or later.

The amount of people willing to pay this type of money and the inevitable markups on these products is finite. “It’s Japanese and therefore better” can only take you so far. What a silly, cynical waste this vehicle is.

V10omous
V10omous
4 months ago

It’s 1995 all over again….

Ron Bitter
Ron Bitter
4 months ago
Reply to  V10omous

I have a 1994 300ZX, so I am biased, but that generation was so far ahead of the contemporary Corvettes and Camaros it fully justified its’ price. This new one on the other hand does not make a strong case for itself.

Carbon Fiber Sasquatch
Carbon Fiber Sasquatch
4 months ago

To add to your last paragraph, the answer to “I want a Japanese dedicated sports car under $80k” is the Supra. The fact that a manual Supra is under $60k is what has this Z dead to me.

Nsane In The MembraNe
Nsane In The MembraNe
4 months ago

I agree, but many of the real hardcore JDM fans won’t touch the Supra because of its German roots. My personal take is “B58 go brrr” and that if I was in the market for a 2 seat pure sports car a manual Supra would be near the top of my list. That and a used ZL1. The fact that you can find those in the high 50s/low 60s is lunacy to me. Sheer madness.

Carbon Fiber Sasquatch
Carbon Fiber Sasquatch
4 months ago

ZL1 vs Nismo Z is a no-brainer, so many lightly used cars make this look ridiculous. C7 Grand Sports are $50k all day!

Greg
Greg
4 months ago

how many of those people are there really though? And then how many of them are buying a brand new car for 60k+ I’d be willing to bet the numbers are very low.

Cerberus
Cerberus
4 months ago

It’s hilariously ironic, too, since it was the Japanese who came to be such a force in the industry by eating market share from the complacent American, then European makes who had been coasting on loyal buyers (US), a storied name (Euro), and past glories (both). (I especially remember laughing about Bentley in the ’90s bragging about LeMans wins from the damn 1920s before Audi bought/gave them a win in 2003.)

Nsane In The MembraNe
Nsane In The MembraNe
4 months ago
Reply to  Cerberus

You either die a hero or live long enough to become the villain

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