Home » You Can Buy A New Alfa Romeo Giulia For Less Than The Price Of A Subaru WRX (And Should)

You Can Buy A New Alfa Romeo Giulia For Less Than The Price Of A Subaru WRX (And Should)

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The Alfa Romeo Giulia is one of the best new sports sedans you can buy today. Sure, it has its flaws, but it’s eager and soulful and oh-so-characterful. Mind you, these flaws mean that it’s been the exact opposite of a sales success. We’re nearly three months into the year and brand new leftover 2022s are still littering dealer lots, often advertised at heavily-discounted prices. Yes, if you’re on the hunt for a deal in today’s sky-high car market, you might want to take a brave pill and consider going Italian.

Cheap Alfa Romeo Giulia 1

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Let’s kick things off with the cheapest delivery-mileage Alfa Romeo Giulia in the country, this basic-yet-gorgeous Anodized Blue Metallic Sprint model in Van Nuys, California. It originally carried an MSRP of $45,605 and is advertised for $30,985, although that’s a red herring. This unit is loaded up with shitty high-margin options like an $1,899 GPS tracking system, a $399 charge for nitrogen-filled tires, and a $1,699 charge for “3 Year Paint Protection” which is most likely just a cheap coating. However, even with that unscrupulous package hidden in the fine print, the car still comes out to $34,982, or more than $10,000 off.

Poke around online and it’s not hard to find loaded Honda Civic Touring models retailing close to that $34,982 figure once dealer markup is added. Here’s one listed for $34,398, or just $584 less than what that Giulia costs after all the hidden fees are added. Granted, the new Civic is very economical and comfortable and spacious, but wouldn’t you rather drive a Giulia for basically the same money? Perhaps a more direct comparison on the performance side of things is the new 2023 Subaru WRX Limited which carries a suggested retail price of $38,515 including a $1,020 freight charge. That’s right, the Alfa Romeo costs less than the Subaru. What a strange world we’re living in.

Cheap Alfa Romeo Giulia 2

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Spend a little bit more and you’re able to jump up to the mid-range Ti trim. Here’s an all-wheel-drive Alfa Romeo Giulia Ti all shiny and new up for sale in Cincinnati, Ohio for $38,685. That’s a hell of a lot cheaper than the $48,985 it originally listed for. Sure, white isn’t the most inspiring color and $38,685 doesn’t include the phenomenal optional column-mounted paddle shifters, but it’s still a great deal for a brand-new, all-wheel-drive sports sedan with 280 horsepower.

In fact, several dealerships across the country have brand new Giulias up for grabs for less than $40,000. Here’s a red all-wheel-drive Giulia Sprint for sale in Minnesota for $38,990. It’s marked down $7,785 from MSRP, and it even has the alloy paddle shifters. The Alfa dealership in Forth Worth claims to have a Sprint model with $10,000 on the hood. That’s a hell of a lot of money put on zesty sports sedans to simply move them off the lots. Oh, and if you’re willing to accept a demo unit with a few thousand miles on it, deeply-discounted selection gets even greater.

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Other than perceptions around reliability, I can’t possibly see why new Giulias are this unloved. Sure, the inability to truly kill traction control will make you want to stab someone, and the ergonomics do have a learning curve, but the steering is delightfully quick, the chassis feels agile in a way most modern sports sedans don’t, and damping recalls BMW’s halcyon days with tuning that’s well-controlled yet still breathes with the road. It even has a quality feel with well-damped switchgear and lovely upholstery.

At MSRP, the Alfa Romeo Giulia’s appeal is limited. It’s just too far out of reach for enthusiast shoppers on a middleweight budget and only the most hopeless automotive romantics would pay that sort of money for something without the modern connectivity or extensive dealer network of a BMW 3-Series. However, at less than $40,000, it becomes a tantalizing proposition. The Hyundai Elantra N is as exciting as a stag night, but it’s not the most refined sedan out there and good luck finding one at MSRP. The Volkswagen Jetta GLI with the DSG is a few grand cheaper on paper than these Giulias, but it doesn’t dance like these Alfas, nor look nearly as good. You can get a Subaru WRX Limited with a manual, but if automatic comfort is your aim, the Giulia’s ZF eight-speed automatic gearbox is more tantalizing than the CVT in the Subaru.

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Of course, the catch is that leftover 2022 Giulias probably won’t be around forever. Even with the extra attention I’m giving them, supply will likely run out by 2025 or so. They’re just not fast-moving cars on showroom floors. However, if you want a brand new car right now, have $35,000 to $40,000 to spend, and don’t want to pay through the nose or wait months, grab yourself a leftover 2022 Alfa Romeo Giulia. Sure, depreciation could be horrendous, but every corner should be a grin.

(Photo credits: Alfa Romeo, Russell Westbrook Alfa Romeo, Cincinnati North Alfa Romeo)

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William B
William B
2 months ago

Always makes me wonder when I read comments on a car site from people crowing about their cheap little family cars and how happy they are to never have to worry about being in the shop. I’ve seen enough of those Nissans, Kias and Mazdas give people headaches. I see BMWs and Audis everywhere despite their terrible reliability and cost of ownership. My 2020 Giulia runs great, hasn’t given me any issues and I can do regular maintenance on it myself. Not trying to brag; I got mine loaded for considerably less than a new Charger/Mustang. I just don’t understand the bragging/pretentiousness of the “reliable grocery getter” crowd.

Thancr
Thancr
1 year ago

Just had my wife’s 2021 Stelvio Ti in for a minor recall. Speaking with the head of the service department he mentioned that both the Guilia and the Stelvio since 2020 have been extremely reliable. Anyone making claims about them being in service for several months a year are writing about the early Guilia Quadrifoglios and a lesser degree the pre-2020 regular Guilias and Stelvios. I’ve been surprised over the past 6 months or so that reviews consistently have the Stelvio among the top Luxury Compact SUVs, usually only the Macan, Audi RSQ5, X3M and AMG GLC are rated higher.
With all that said, my wife won’t get a new one in a couple of years. She likes it and it looks way better than most other options, but she doesn’t love it.

BOSdriver
BOSdriver
1 year ago

I would have one in a heartbeat. Test drove several but the deal breaker was the size, just too small to fit me comfortably. I ended up in a new Sonata N Line at the time for the price of a 3 year old Giulia. I think the 2019 and later came with more seat adjustability but still too tight, plus lack of rear leg room, even for my smaller kids at the time. The N Line is borderline for me as well, but it at least fits me and honestly is a ton of fun to drive, even if different than the rwd biased Alfa.

Jon M
Jon M
1 year ago

These really are fantastic car. Most of the reliability issues are limited to 2017 model year cars. There were some early software glitches. Once mine got through teething it was fantastic. I had the Ti Lusso and I’ve never had another car that was fun to drive and still cross country road trip comfortable. It really is the do all drivers car. Want to burn up a back road, great at it. Want to comfortably and quietly make miles disappear, here’s your car. The lusso package is worth it, wraps most of the interior in leather and the smell is just amazing.

MikeInTheWoods
MikeInTheWoods
1 year ago

I’m a cheapskate, so $40k is 2.5 vehicles or more for me. But if you stuck one of my limbs in a vice and made me pick a vehicle for $40k I’d pick a $34K sweet used California car and spend the rest on a vacation back to Maine. Having a nice older car that is without rust would be more luxury than a plastic Italian car.

Vanillasludge
Vanillasludge
1 year ago

There’s always a reason something is unreasonably cheap.

Toecutter
Toecutter
1 year ago

4 years ago, I did see one of these Giulia Quadrifoglios driving around in my hood. It was red, looked brand new, and was an extremely good looking car. Given the post-apocalyptic-looking neighborhood it was driving around in, I can’t help but wonder how the money was obtained to pay for it. The car stood out very well among its surroundings, and I think that is exactly what the overly flamboyant feather-hat wearing male occupant in the drivers’ seat intended. He certainly took notice of the diminutive one-seater vehicle I was riding in, which was amusing.

If I’m going to go Alfa, and deal with the potential issues it will bring as well as the scattered dealer network, a used 4C is more my jam. Wish it came with a manual.

For a family hauler, a boring Asian car would be my preference(Honda Accord, Nissan Altima, Kia Forte, ect.). I don’t generally like my cars to surprise me, because automotive surprises usually aren’t a good thing.

Cryptoenologist
Cryptoenologist
1 year ago

It’s not just perceived reliability issues. There are many examples of these that spend months in the shop before reaching 3 years of age. If you’re fine with driving loaners a bunch, it might be a fun option to lease.

CivoLee
CivoLee
1 year ago

Not in my neck of the woods. Cheapest I’ve seen is 42 grand.

Gee See
Gee See
1 year ago

How many Giulia made it to North America (in case you need to scavange for parts), are the diagnostic tools readily available after market? Not just OBD2 but CAN bus another diagnostic modes that are no usually available. For me the sample size matters, especially when it comes to whether the cars are reliable.

One of my extended family bought a 164 when new, it was a nightmare, but the kids liked the experience when they became adult they bought a used Spider.

Andrea Petersen
Andrea Petersen
1 year ago
Reply to  Gee See

Yes, you can get AlfaOBD if you’re a normal person or if you’re me, the newest scanner we have has Alfa stuff. Such tools are needed to reset CBSes and do things like battery programming.

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