Home » GMC Typhoon, U.S. Navy YP 675, Packard 120 Sport Coupe: Mercedes’ Marketplace Madness

GMC Typhoon, U.S. Navy YP 675, Packard 120 Sport Coupe: Mercedes’ Marketplace Madness

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Welcome back to Mercedes’ Marketplace Madness! As you know, I love picking up dirt-cheap cars, motorcycles, and campers, and then telling you lovely readers about the dumb things that I do with them. I’m always looking for the next deal, but most of the time, I’m left empty-handed. At the same time, I love building a list of cars, trucks, and motorcycles that I would buy if I had the money.

Mercedes’ Marketplace Madness turns the long list of vehicles I’d love to buy into something for you all to enjoy. Some of them are cheap and some of them are not. Some of the vehicles I find are purely window shopping for everyone other than a collector like Beau or Myron.

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Vidframe Min Bottom

Once again, my fast-paced schedule has pushed Mercedes’ Marketplace Madness to the back burner, but we are back! This week, I didn’t hold myself to a specific price range, but there’s a little bit of everything here from an inexpensive GMC SUV legend to a whole boat.

Let’s see what has been distracting me this week.

1985 Maserati Quattroporte – $13,000

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Facebook Seller

Since 1963, Italian automaker Maserati has given sports car buyers to take the family with them with the luxurious Quattroporte. An unimaginative name, Quattroporte means “four doors.” Here’s some history from Maserati:

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In the early part of the decade, Giulio Alfieri started to work on a completely new project that would, in retrospect, be seen as a revolutionary concept in the world of high-performance automobiles. Inspired by the success of its Gran Turismo cars, Maserati set its sights on a sedan the equal of its coupes and spyders. The new Quattroporte—Italian for “four doors”—would have to offer the same pedigree and level of elegance, refinement and power for which the marque had become famous. With a top speed of 143 mph, it was the fastest four-door production car at the time.

The third generation of Maserati’s luxury sedan more than made up for the Quattroporte II. Alejandro De Tomaso—no fan of Citroën—discarded all Citroën technology used on the Quattroporte II. Mechanical parts came from the Kyalami, and the Quattroporte was again powered by a Maserati V8 engine and rear-wheel drive. The impressive body of the Quattroporte III was designed by Giugiaro and the steel body shells were built at the Innocenti plant near Milan, prior to assembly in Modena. When the car went on sale in 1979, it was an instant commercial success. In 1987, a restyled version called Quattroporte Royale offered an upgraded interior and more powerful 4.9-liter engine. Production of the Quattroporte III continued until 1990, with a total of 2,145 examples made.

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Facebook Seller

Power comes from the aforementioned 4.9-liter V8 and it’s making 276 HP. That’s bolted to a Chrysler A727 three-speed automatic. The seller notes some cosmetic wear to the hood and an issue with the rear rear window, the power antenna, and the hood’s struts. It’s $13,000 from the seller in Greenville, South Carolina with 26,400 miles. Listing courtesy of Obscure Cars for Sale.

1957 Studebaker Commander Provincial – $22,500

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Facebook Seller

Studebaker first started using the Commander name in 1927 and with some short interruptions through the years, the automaker had some sort of vehicle carrying the name until the brand shut down in 1966. Throughout that time, the Commander often found itself slotted into the middle of the Studebaker range as a volume product.

In 1953, Bob Bourke of the Raymond Loewy design studio penned a new design for Studebaker, and the automaker applied it to the mid-range Commander line. By 1956, the Commander’s styling was revised again, with the family cars in the Commander lineup losing the Loewy low-slung design for taller sheet metal and a wraparound windshield.

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Facebook Seller

The Commander was available in a number of body styles. A lesser-known Commander style is the Provincial wagon. As Curbside Classic notes, Studebaker was hurting for cash at the time, so it had to redesign cars on a shoestring budget. As a result, the Provincial looks both old and modern at the same time with a dash of European flair. Power comes from a 259 cubic inch V8 good for 180 HP.

This Provincial has been restored and presents in good condition without rust. It’s $22,500 from the seller in Sparta, Georgia with 98,000 miles.

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1978 Testi Grand Prix – $2,600

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OfferUp Seller

Here’s a moped from a brand you’ve perhaps never heard of before. Testi history begins with Umberto Testi, who opened a shop in 1932 or 1934 to build touring and racing bicycles. By 1947 or 1948, Testi expanded his venture into placing engines in those bicycles. These first motorized bicycles first had roller motors and then Garelli Mosquito engines. Later Testi mopeds would be powered by Sachs, NSU, and FB-Minarelli engines.

Production of the original Testi mopeds ended in 1956. The family business was restarted in 1959 by Testi’s son, Erio Testi. Velomotor Testi, later just called Testi, essentially picked up where the old company left off. The Testi Grand Prix looks like a racing motorcycle, but it is far milder. Power comes from a 49cc Minarelli two-stroke coupled to a four-speed transmission. The seller says this example comes with an 80cc Polini kit, a Polini carburetor, and a Simonini Circuit exhaust. Top speed is 42 mph and the moped comes with a bunch of new parts including paint, chain, grips, bars, brakes, and more.

It’s $2,600 from the seller in Garden Grove, California.

1958 U.S. Navy YP 675 – $199,000

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Wrex

I’ve been obsessed with naval vessels lately. Maybe I’m falling in love with them for the same reason I adore the Grumman LLV. They’re vehicles built for a specific purpose and are sort of forbidden fruit to regular people. Here’s a former Navy vessel. It started life as the U.S. Navy Yard Patrol Craft YP 675, but today it’s under private ownership doing expeditions as the R/V Eastern Surveyor.

The United States Navy provides a helpful description of the Yard Patrol Craft:

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The YPs are used to teach familiarization with water craft, Basic Damage Control and underway instruction of Basic to Advanced Seamanship and Navigation. Yard Patrol craft provide realistic, at-sea training in navigation and seamanship for midshipmen at the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, Md., and candidates at Officer Candidate School, Pensacola, Fla. These craft can cruise for 1400 nautical miles at 12 knots for five days without refueling.

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Wrex

The YPs are used at the Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division, Keyport, Wash., to measure mobile underwater target and torpedo radiated noise plus ambient water noise conditions; serve as a platform for deployment of suspended, stationary, in-water acoustic targets during on-range torpedo proof and test operations; deployment of countermeasure emulator during torpedo operations; and deployment of oceanographic measurement instrumentation to determine seawater conductivity and temperature at the depth(s) of interest.

YP 675 is a YP 654 class vessel. It was launched in 1958 from Stephens Bros., Inc. of Stockton, California, and was the last of 22 YP 654 class vessels. These are reportedly considered to be among some of the best wooden naval vessels built. YP 675 then served with the US Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland in 1958. In 1979, the vessel found itself at Peterson Builders in Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin, where it was built to its current specification.

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Wrex

Power comes from a pair of Detroit Diesel 12V-71N engines. These are 14-liter engines rated for 437 shaft HP each and they power two propellers. YP 654 class vessels displace 66 tons with a full load, measure 81 feet long, and have a beam of 18 feet. Draft with a full load is 6 feet. In its current configuration, the R/V Eastern Surveyor has a cruising speed of 10 knots, a top speed of 14 knots, and carries 2,100 gallons of fuel. Amenities include air-conditioning, a furnace, a galley, and quarters for ten people. The vessel has a wooden hull and an aluminum superstructure.

As a research vessel, it explored shipwrecks, landmarks, and other areas between Nashville and the Gulf of Mexico. If you’re as interested as I am, the R/V Eastern Surveyor can be yours for $199,000 from the seller in Nashville, Tennessee.

2008 Pontiac Solstice Shooting Brake – $8,900

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Midwest Motor Company

Here’s a car that’s about the closest you’ll get to having a modern Pontiac shooting brake. Here’s some history I’ve written about the Solstice in the past:

As Hagerty writes, Bob Lutz long sat on a dream to bring an affordable American roadster to market. During his tenure at Ford, this roadster idea became the Ghia Barchetta concept, which would eventually morph into the Mercury Capri. While a top-down coupe, its front-wheel-drive layout didn’t quite hit the mark. Over at Chrysler, Lutz’s roadster dreams were realized in the Dodge Copperhead and the Plymouth Pronto Spyder, neither of which reached production.

This time, Lutz would see his dream become reality. In 2002, the Solstice concept was revealed at the North American International Auto Show. There, Lutz reportedly boldly proclaimed “the North American market is ripe for an affordable, pure roadster executed to top global standards on perceived quality, both inside and out.”

Now, some of the Kappa platform roadsters were made into factory hardtop coupes, but this Solstice wasn’t one of them. Germany-based company EDAG created an aftermarket hardtop conversion for the Solstice that installs into the car’s existing hardware for mounting. There’s a hatch, which adds some storage space and there’s even a functional window defroster back there, too.

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Midwest Motor Company

It’s not known exactly how many of these were made, but it’s rumored that maybe a couple of dozen of these are in the United States. Anyway, this EDAG hardtop is attached to a 2008 Pontiac Solstice, which sports a 2.4-liter four making 177 HP and 166 lb-ft of torque. This isn’t the desirable 2.0-liter turbo, but the 2.4 is a durable powerplant that should serve you well for years.

It comes attached to an automatic transmission, which will be good or bad depending on who you are. I generally choose manual cars for my marketplace finds, but some readers have recently pointed out that not everyone in our community drives or even cares about manuals. If you are one of those people, this car is for you! It’s $8,900 from Midwest Motor Company in Joplin, Missouri with 101,000 miles.

1935 Packard 120 Sport Coupe – $59,900

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Hemmings Seller

A century ago, the Packard name used to signify American automotive elegance. Today, most people might know of the ruins of the Packard plant in Detroit, and that’s sad. Technically, Packard has been revived again, but it’s hard to beat an original. Packard, which was founded in Detroit in 1899, was a member of the “Three Ps.” That’s Packard, Peerless, and Pierce-Arrow, three companies known for innovation and luxury.

Packard’s claimed innovations include the V12 engine, the modern steering wheel, car air-conditioning, automatic spark advance, the H-pattern gear shift, the hook-up accelerator pedal, and so many more. Reportedly, pioneer James Packard racked up 43 patents as he advanced motoring.

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Hemmings Seller

From 1924 to 1930, Packard led the world in luxury car sales. Then, the roaring twenties came to a crash, taking so many businesses with it. Suddenly, an expensive hand-built Packard was no longer on the menu for many Americans. In an effort to stay afloat, Packard launched the 120 line as a mid-priced option for the Great Depression. The 120 would be built on an assembly line and could be cranked out for far cheaper than Packard’s typical fare. Despite being a lower model, the 120 still boasted an eight-cylinder engine, hydraulic brakes, and even introduced the Packard line to independent front suspension. And you got it all for a third of the price of a Senior Packard.

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The 120 Sport Coupe is a fine example that the brand still had a lot of style. Power comes from a 257 cubic inch eight rated for 110 HP. That power reaches the rear wheels through a manual transmission. This 120 Sport Coupe has a leather interior and two-year-old paint. It’s $59,900 from the seller in Alamogordo, New Mexico.

1993 GMC Typhoon – $18,950

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Midwest Motor Company

 

Back in the 1980s and 1990s, General Motors produced a number of sinister tire-shredding vehicles. The Grand National took the hearts of muscle car fans while the bulky Chevrolet 454 SS pickup laid down big block power through a full-size pickup. In the early 1990s, the General cranked out the GMC Syclone and the Typhoon, a truck and SUV that ate European sports cars for lunch.

For many, the Typhoon is the original performance SUV. As the story goes, in 1987 as Grand National was ending production, Buick engineers lowered the Grand National’s 3.8-liter turbo six into a Chevy S-10. Those engineers pitched the super truck to Chevrolet and General Motors and got a denial from both. GMC liked this idea of a speedy truck but reportedly felt that the Grand National’s turbo six would have been too costly to fit.

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Midwest Motor Company

By 1989 GMC presented the GMC Syclone concept to the world, putting it into production in 1991. A year later, the Syclone would be joined by its SUV equivalent, the GMC Typhoon. The Typhoon shares the same drivetrain as the Syclone, featuring a 4.3-liter LB4 turbocharged V6 making 280 HP and 360 lb-ft of torque. This was good for sprints to 60 mph in just 5.3 seconds. Car and Driver found the black menace’s performance more than enough to destroy the Ferrari 348ts and V8-powered Ford Mustangs. It was just a tick slower than an Acura NSX in a quarter mile, stopped better than a Ferrari, and the magazine even compared it favorably to a Corvette.

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Sadly, just 4,697 Typhoons were ever made and most of the ones you’ll find for sale will be very pricey. Here’s one that’s not. However, the selling dealership, Midwest Motor Company, notes that this example has some cosmetic damage, some engine modifications, a lowering kit, and Corvette C5 wheels. So, this is far from a stock example. Steering is also noted to have a little slop. It’s $18,950 from the dealer in Joplin, Missouri with 85,670 miles.

1963 Willys Jeep Truck – $20,000

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Hemmings Seller

I love classic pickup trucks. There’s something dreamy about cruising down a country road in an old piece of American iron. Many people will choose an old Ford, Dodge, or Chevrolet product, but Willys is always worth a look, too. When the Willys-Overland Jeep Truck made its debut in 1947, it was pitched as the truck for the modern farmer, from Jeep:

An early advertisement promoted “The new ‘Jeep’ Trucks are the biggest news in the medium-duty field.” Two and four-wheel-drive models were originally marketed to the modern farmer. The 118-inch-wheelbase pickup truck marked Willys-Overland’s first attempt to diversify the Jeep® Brand beyond the short-wheelbase flat fender.

The Jeep Brand Truck was produced with minor sheet-metal changes until the Gladiator pickups replaced them in the ’60s. With two- and four-wheel drive models available, the Jeep® Brand Truck could be fitted with a pickup or stake bed, chassis or cab, or as a bare chassis. Late-’40s pickups were available with four-wheel drive—a feature not available on Chevy or Ford trucks until 1957 and 1959 respectfully.

Many of the Jeep Brand truck components were shared with the Willys Wagon, in particular the Go Devil engine, the 72 hp “Super Hurricane” L-head six found on earlier models and the “Tornado” engine that found its way into later versions.

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Hemmings Seller

Power comes from a 6-226 cubic inch Super Hurricane six, rated for 105 HP, or 115 HP with a two-barrel carburetor. That’s backed by a manual transmission and new parts include a carburetor, clutch, distributor, fuel pump, and 12 volt alternator. The cab of the truck also comes with seatbelts. The seller also states that the truck has gotten new suspension parts, brakes, and a fuel tank. Reportedly, the truck has driven just 750 miles since the engine, transmission, and transfer case have been overhauled.

It’s $20,000 from the seller in Cumming, Georgia.

1995 Rover Mini Tartan – $16,700

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Nomad Auto Imports

I’m surprised that through all of the Mercedes’ Marketplace Madness and previously, Dopest Cars entries I’ve written, I’ve never featured a classic Mini. That will change today. These cars aren’t just adorable and a ball of fun, but an important part of motoring history. I’ll let Jason Torchinsky explain:

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If you’re somehow unaware of the original Morris/Austin Mini and its legacy, you’re lucky that I like talking about it, so prepare yourself for a vigorous synopsizing: After WWII, there was a real need in Britain for a good, cheap, fuel-efficient people’s car, pretty much the exact same motivation that birthed the Volkswagen Beetle in Germany, the Citroën 2CV in France, and the Fiat 500 in Italy. The Suez oil crisis of 1956 hit Europe hard, and this really emphasized the need for small, fuel-efficient cars in the UK.

Though small “bubble cars” with incredible fuel efficiency like the BMW Isetta and Messerschmitt KR250 were available, British Motor Corporation (BMC) head Leonard Lord hated them, and wanted to “drive them off the streets by designing a proper small car.” That’s what the missive was to the lead engineer of the project, the brilliant Alec Issigonis, and the result was the Mini.

The Mini’s final design, going into production in 1959, was ingenious; it was a 10-foot-long car made up of a big box with a smaller box up front, and that smaller box contained a transverse-mounted four-cylinder “A-series” (as it was called) engine. The transmission was mounted in the oil sump of the engine for maximum space efficiency, and while modern cars generally don’t do that, the overall transverse/FWD layout eventually became the dominant automotive design of the future. (The vast majority of cars today use it).

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Nomad Auto Imports

There were a ton of different variations on the Mini and perhaps even more special editions. To illustrate what I mean, take a look at this Mini Tartan Edition. These cars were made just in 1995 and just for the Japanese and UK markets. Most Tartan Edition cars (or Mini Sidewalk for UK buyers) were painted red, but some came in British Racing Green with a white roof. No matter the example you got, the interior was filled with bold fabrics featuring a tartan pattern. It’s estimated that only 1,000 of these were sold in the UK and it’s not said how many were sold in Japan.

This example came from Japan and it comes powered by a 1.3-liter four good for 53 HP. That drives the front wheels through a four-speed automatic. It’s $16,700 by Nomad Auto Imports in Flint, Michigan with just 2,474 miles.

That’s it for this week! Thank you for reading.

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Xpumpx
Xpumpx
14 days ago

that packard looks like somebody parked a little car on a big car from the side. That solstice looks pretty sweet. Mini is sharp as well

Greensoul
Greensoul
15 days ago

The interior of the Mini wins the day. That Stude wagon came with a built in theater seating butt end.

Myk El
Myk El
16 days ago

Outstanding lineup overall this week. If I had to take just 1, I think I’m going with that Mini. But the Willys, Studebaker, GMC and Pontiac all appeal.

rctothefuture
rctothefuture
16 days ago

Sure was nice of Studebaker to give their owners a swim platform on the back of their wagons!

Justin Haas
Justin Haas
16 days ago

What in the heck are those circles on the windshield of the Navy boat? Wipers?

Ikaiyoo
Ikaiyoo
16 days ago
Reply to  Justin Haas

They are called clear view screens. The wiper you see spins fast enough you dont see it when looking through it and it keeps the areas clear from water.

Black Peter
Black Peter
16 days ago
Reply to  Justin Haas

yes. like the ones on CNC equipment, they seem small, no?

Taco Shackleford
Taco Shackleford
17 days ago

We took this trip to Garden Grove
It smelled like Two-Stroke inside the van, oh yeah
This ain’t no funky moped party
Twenty six hundred dollars at the door

It gets so real sometimes
Who wrote my rhyme?
I’ve got the Testi bike
Got the VCR
I got the Grand-Prix
In the trunk of my car, oh yeah.

Last edited 17 days ago by Taco Shackleford
Taco Shackleford
Taco Shackleford
17 days ago

If you only knew all the Bikes that I found
It’s hard to keep my wheels on the ground
You’re a fool, don’t fuck around with my bike
All that I can see I Buy I fill up my garage
‘Cause in my mind
Moped from the 70s, all the love that I found
Pull over, there’s a reason why my soul’s unsound

Taco Shackleford
Taco Shackleford
17 days ago

It’s you, it’s that peddal stuck under my shoe
It’s that smell inside the van
It’s my oil stain covered with sand
Sittin’ through a shitty band
Gettin’ fuel mix on my hands
Gettin’ hassled by the man

Urban Runabout
Urban Runabout
18 days ago

I want to take the Quattroporte and convert it to EV – after I paint it medium blue metallic.

Nlpnt
Nlpnt
18 days ago

You’ve heard of those fold-out “eventer” seats on the tailgate of some newer Range Rovers?

Studebaker was doing that in the late ’50s, only you could leave the tailgate closed and just sit on the back bumper and use the tailfins as armrests on your ’58 Studebaker Commander Parkbench, sorry, Provincial, wagon.

Church
Church
18 days ago

Some good stuff this week. Thanks!

Hans Sjodin
Hans Sjodin
18 days ago

I love this collum, I cruise FBook marketplace all day, I’m sure many reader’s do as well. Keep it up!

Curtis Loew
Curtis Loew
18 days ago

The Typhoon has no air conditioning. That is really going to hurt the price as not many want or would be able to drive a black suv with black leather seats in the summer in most of the country.

Hans Sjodin
Hans Sjodin
18 days ago
Reply to  Curtis Loew

But the car is so cool, A/C not required……..

Dr. Asteroid
Dr. Asteroid
18 days ago

I want the Mini.

Jim Zavist
Jim Zavist
18 days ago

If you want another Midwestern rabbit hole to go down, Country Classic Cars, in Staunton, IL., is always worth a trip. https://www.countryclassiccars.com/

Rad Barchetta
Rad Barchetta
18 days ago

So what do you call a pair of those mopeds?

Urban Runabout
Urban Runabout
18 days ago
Reply to  Rad Barchetta

Bipeds?

Rad Barchetta
Rad Barchetta
17 days ago
Reply to  Urban Runabout

Testes. Testes is what I was going for.

Urban Runabout
Urban Runabout
17 days ago
Reply to  Rad Barchetta

That’s Nuts.

OCS-BN
OCS-BN
16 days ago
Reply to  Rad Barchetta

Testicl…oh wait, damn, you almost got me.

David Escargot
David Escargot
18 days ago

I didn’t realise it was the quattropotre that took the fastest 4 door title off the XY GTHO

Martin English
Martin English
17 days ago
Reply to  David Escargot

I was operating off memory, and I thought that Maserati claim sounded suss, but there’s a few complications …
It turns out that the Ford Falcon XY GTHO could hit the redline in top gear (I.E. 157 mph), BUT the engine was limited in top gear in the factory delivered cars. According to Wikipedia, the Phase III GTHO, in full street trim, was clocked at 142mph by Wheels magazine in October 1971.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ford_XY_Falcon_GT and search for October 1971

David Escargot
David Escargot
16 days ago
Reply to  Martin English

I was operating of memory too, I was thinking of that wlWheels article… interesting to note

AmericanInGermany
AmericanInGermany
18 days ago

A friend’s Mom drove a new Quattroporte in those same colors when I was in 2nd grade in the early 80s…in Florida. I am 200% sure this isn’t that car as it was already showing its age after a year of ownership. I still recall that wild orange interior!

Mechjaz
Mechjaz
18 days ago

The Typhoon is much better looking inside than I expected, but I’m here to drool over the Packard. What a fabulous hole to throw money into.

A. Barth
A. Barth
18 days ago

The Testi is beautiful! That exhaust is *chef’s kiss*

However, I really dislike it when people install Clubman handlebars upside-down. 🙁

They are are supposed to emulate clip-ons, the very low race-type bars that come in two pieces and attach directly to the top part of the forks.

Squirrelmaster
Squirrelmaster
18 days ago
Reply to  A. Barth

Thank you for this! I was trying to figure out why the handlebars looked so goofy, but you are spot on.

Sam I am
Sam I am
18 days ago

That Quattroporte seems like such a profoundly bad idea, yet I want it so badly.

Last edited 18 days ago by Sam I am
Shop-Teacher
Shop-Teacher
19 days ago

I want that Typhoon BAD!

Squirrelmaster
Squirrelmaster
18 days ago
Reply to  Shop-Teacher

Me too. Given that someone already messed with it, I wouldn’t feel nearly as bad about messing with it more as I would if it was all stock. As good as the ZR1s look, I’d still want the factory wheels, though.

Protodite
Protodite
19 days ago

God it’s such a bummer that solstice is an auto! It’s super super cool though. I find myself wishing the roof was in body color, but the way that rear haunch goes over the glass is so nice.

Also woof that is a very very attractive Packard

Hondaimpbmw 12
Hondaimpbmw 12
17 days ago
Reply to  Protodite

Shortly after the Solstice was introduced, Hot Rod magazine offered an article (liberally assisted by GM engineers) that gave a nut & bolt breakdown of what it would take to install a Camaro LS V8 along w/ the 6 speed transmission and stouter rear end. This car would be a super starting point for someone who doesn’t live in California.

Mercedes, is the Jeep pickup a 2 wheel or 4 wheel drive truck? The front axle doesn’t have locking hubs, but they probably wouldn’t have from the factory.

Detroit-Lightning
Detroit-Lightning
19 days ago

That Typhoon / 2 door Jimmy look is soooooooo good.

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