Home » I Have To Sell My Project Cars, What Car Should I Buy?

I Have To Sell My Project Cars, What Car Should I Buy?

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Hi, it’s Steve, the nerdy NVH engineer from metro Detroit. The time has come to sell my cars, and while my collection might not rival David or Stephen Gossin’s, it’s gotten a little away from me. At my job, I switched to a new, awesome position, but it requires a lot more work and time on the road. I have my website, DIYauto.com, that I try to manage, and I have this crack at living out a lifelong dream as an automotive journalist. Oh, I also have a family that includes a two-year-old. If you haven’t heard, toddlers require lots of attention. 

I’m not complaining! At some point you realize that to give all the different aspects of your life the attention they deserve, you need to trim the fat somewhere. I’m sure David felt the same a couple of years ago when he sold most of his Jeep collection/sculpture garden  [ED Note: That’s cold! -DT] and moved to LA. It was probably painful to let those go, but out of that came the freedom to build this awesome website and community of weirdos we are all a part of. 

Vidframe Min Top
Vidframe Min Bottom

I’ve always had a baseline number of vehicles. But it has grown a bit. Plus I disobeyed the rule that I rarely follow: never daily a project. “Audi S8s often go over 200,000 miles! When the transmission fails I can just swap in a manual, the car will double in value!” I told myself.

What hubris! When a “mint” 1994 Bonneville SSEI, a dream car of mine, came for sale I thought “Is the legendary 3800, it will never die, I can just drive that when the Audi is down!” And that’s what I’m doing now folks. Driving the Bonneville is kind of great, the Audi being down? Not so much.

There’s a marked difference between good wrenching and bad wrenching. Spending a Sunday night lying on a freezing cement floor changing wheel bearings, or rebuilding a VANOS unit in the driveway using a houselamp for illumination — all so you can drive to work the next day — isn’t great wrenching. Add in the time sourcing parts and looking up DIYs for a whole fleet of vehicles, and it’s enough to scramble your brain. 

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So, dear readers, I need your help so I can maximize the good, and minimize the bad. Help me choose which project cars, if any, to keep; and what I should buy as a daily driver. The power is in your greasy hands folks. But I trust yall, I think… 

The Stable

First, we will go over the cars I’m selling for sure.

Selling. 1987 Chevy C10 on airbags

Checy C10 BagsI never sought out to buy a bagged C10, but these things happen. I saw the photo on Craigslist, nestled in the snow like a brawny golden brick, and had to check it out. The truck was running when I got to the industrial park it was residing in, but laying on the frame with no real way to move. The owner shiftily explained that all the valves had gotten knocked off, but he had all the parts and would fix it up so it was drivable if I bought it. Stupidly I agreed and gave him the cash for the title. The guy subsequently disappeared off the face of the earth, and so did the truck! I called local towing companies and found the yard it was towed to, and for a price, they were nice enough to bring it to my house. 

At least the seller was honest about the airbag suspension valves being torn out. I replaced the old valves with a modern Airlift management system. Besides a few other small items to repair, that was it! It’s far from a show truck, there are dents, the paint is faded, there’s a fist-sized hole in the driver’s floorboard covered with a license plate. The interior didn’t come with carpet but there were a few bullets in the glovebox, so fair trade. 

This has been an honest reliable truck, that we’ve used for truck stuff more than anything. Sure it was a lot of fun to have the fam sit in the back and drive around the Dream Cruise, but it’s also been nice for grabbing furniture off Marketplace or picking up piles of sod or potatoes or whatever else people do. As much as I think the C10 is the perfect aesthetic form for a pickup truck, my heart has always pined for a Ford RangerSplash in some suitable ’90s pastel color with the friendly face. Plus the C10 takes up the whole length of the garage, I literally can’t walk past it with the garage door closed. I like it but I don’t love it. About a dozen people have stopped in the street and asked if it’s for sale this summer. So this will go up first and hopefully go quickly. 

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Selling: 2001 Audi S8

Audi S8Everyone loves a hero car, and this car matches the Ronin hype. However, it’s not one of those squeaky-clean heroes like Adam West’s Batman. It’s a raggedy hero with an edge and a dark side, like all the later more sullen Batmen. Under that snow are dents, scratches, and faded paint. The previous owner started swapping out the boring beige interior for a rare black/cognac version and stopped at the dashboard. Beige and cognac don’t mix together on a spiritual level. He also messed up the driver’s heated seat module, which is unfortunate here in Michigan.

But it is fast! It sounds great with the rear muffler delete! It eats up miles and hugs the road like a real bähnstormer! It has the craziest window-sealing system I’ve seen!  It’s also a beast in the snow! Has it been a reliable daily? Depends on your definition. The car runs out of fuel at a half tank of gas because of Audi’s saddle gas tank and its byzantine system of hoses and siphons. The instrument cluster pixels smear together after a few minutes so I don’t know what time it is half the… time. I’m doing the timing belt, water pump service right now which wouldn’t be too bad if I didn’t have to tear the car’s face off to do it. Overall it’s been a great car to own, and I’ll miss it, but I won’t be sad to replace it with something more sensible. 

I may decide to keep one of these next two, what do you think?

Maybe Keeping? A 1994 Pontiac Bonneville SSEI

Pontiac SseiGearheads are like baby birds. Everyone has that car that imprints itself in your brain when you are young. I had been into cars since I could crawl and hold a Hot Wheels in my paw. But I still remember that day when I was 14 years old gathering shopping carts at the local Pick’n ‘Save, when I saw a forest green SSEI sitting on those gold mesh wheels. I thought it was the coolest looking car and I finally got one about a month ago.

The story of me buying it is pretty good so I’ll be writing about that in a review later. But here are the stats: Rust-free Florida car with 80k miles. The Florida sun that didn’t rust the car roached the seats. Fresh 10-ft garage paintjob. New shocks, windshield and headliner. Supercharged 3800 that will outlast us all. Interior quality you’d expect from an early 90’s GM product. Awesome highway cruiser. Easy to wrench on and most parts are available at the local stores. Plus my wife really likes it.

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Maybe Keeping?: S52 Swapped 1988 BMW 528e

Bmw SwapIn stark contrast to my beloved Bonneville, my whole family hates this car. Not so much the car but what getting it did to me. I got this car in trade from one of those car buddies we all have. As part of the trade he would do the engine swap; and this guy had the parts, the facilities, the skills, and the reputation of someone who could do this. However, the swap took about four years of broken promises longer than it was supposed to. At one point it was going to be ready so I could ride in it during the baraat (husband parade) at my Indian wedding. When it was obvious it wouldn’t be finished he said I could use one of his other cool cars, but he never showed up so I used my E38 (still a pretty good parade car). So a majority of my ownership time has been years of repeating bummers which my family and friends obviously noticed. 

So after rescuing it and spending about a year finishing the swap and all those nagging issues it’s finally running, and it runs great. The sounds and sensations that M-tuned inline six makes when it pulls to redline are spiritual. It’s probably the coolest looking car I’ve had and it’s a blast to drive. Unfortunately, it’s got hidden rust problems. There’s a hole in the driver’s footwell and general crustiness underneath. As Mercedes found, getting rust repair on an old BMW is neither easy nor cheap. And I could get about $12k for this car as-is which is a needed chunk of change, in exchange for not having to pay out about half that much to get it mended properly. There’s also some wiring harness cleanup to do and electrical isn’t my bag. I only have about three hours behind the wheel since it’s been running well. I’m going to try to enjoy it as much as I can while I iron out some final issues because it may be on the chopping block.

So fellow Autopians, I want to be down to one project car, what do you say?

If you aren’t mentally exhausted from mulling that over, I’ve got one more for you. What should I get for my next daily?

Requirements: 

1: Reliable

I’m an adult with a job so I have to drive places. Many of which are far away. Eight of my last ten dailies have been older German cars with over 100k miles, some north of 200k miles. As Bruce Willis said, “I’m too old for this shit.” I want my wrenching to be fun again, not due to cold necessity.

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2: Roomy

I have a wife and kid that I occasionally take on road trips. I have to haul equipment around for my job. I have a home and a Home Depot less than a mile from my house. I like cars with plenty of space.

3: Car

I’m sure there are some SUVs and CUVs that would work well for me, but I’m more into cars. Feel free to make suggestions though.

4: Comfortable 

I fully believe that a car’s goodness is situation-dependent. I’ve owned several cars that are known for their handling. A ’94 NSX, a ’91 turbocharged Miata, a Fiesta ST, and a ’69 Midget. There are many places with great roads where these cars would be sublime to own. However, in south east Michigan, we have a grid of neglected roads that are only marginally smoother than the ground in between them. In the occasional on-ramp or roundabout, these cars could be life-affirming. But for the other 98% of my route I’m driving down ruler-straight roads while dodging potholes that would bruise the cockles of my soul. 

The Bonneville is brilliant here. Sure the interior rattles like hell when you cruise over a broken railroad crossing but she can take it. You hear the craters but don’t really feel them. I’m not looking to buy a boat, but it should be nice for long trips while not punishing on our cratered streets.

5: Remote Start

Yes, this eliminates the few manual options that may meet my criteria but in Michigan, it’s freaking necessary. I’ve never owned a car that had it, but seeing my coworkers getting into a warm, defrosted car while I could see my breath for most of the commute made me jealous every time. The last straw came one freezing morning while I was standing in two feet of snow chipping at a sheet of ice so I could open the door while wrangling my one-year-old. “TECHNOLOGY EXISTS!” I thought. “Why do I live like some type of animal!” This is honestly something I really look forward to. 

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6: Fun

You may be looking at these requirements and thinking, “Why am I picking a car for my Grandpa?” I admit, I’m almost 40. I’m getting old but not giving up! The car has to have something that sparks some joy. Just cause it’s a big comfortable cruiser doesn’t mean it can’t be fun to drive. If it comes with a more powerful engine, I’ll want that one. I don’t want to get bored and sell it in a year.

A few more notes: 

Good MPG is nice but not a requirement. I get mileage reimbursement for my work trips so it’s not so bad. I’m not afraid of rebuilt title cars in general, some of my picks are only in my price range if their title isn’t green. Obviously, this is a case-by-case basis. My wife’s car is a 2018 Honda Accord with the 6-speed manual, which is the perfect family car and has been dead nuts reliable. My budget is in the low $20s. Less than $20,000 is better, but I’d say $25k is the ceiling.

Here’s what I’ve been looking at.

Buick Regal Tour X

Buick Regal Tourx

I know it’s hypocritical to say no German cars and have my first choice be an Opel, but this is the most practical one on this list. It’s a wagon, has a good ride, and a 2.0L turbo that makes over 300 HP…  I think [Ed note: The GS version did, but that wasn’t available as a wagon. The wagon has 250 hp – MH]. Plus they look cool. They are kind of rare but there are a handful right around $20k in the area

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Lincoln Continental

Lincoln Conti

I got to benchmark one of those cars and was thoroughly impressed. They look sharp, have a cool interior, an excellent stereo system, and with the twin-turbo V6 it got out of its own way. Since then I’ve had a hankering for one. There are a bunch of these right in my price range.

Chrysler 300

2023 Chrysler 300C

I went to the SRT experience at Michigan International Speedway a while ago and got to drive the whole SRT family. Overall, I liked the 300 the best. These are ubiquitous here in Detroit which is a minus in some ways, and a plus in others. If you drive one of these you could be someone’s Grandma that works at an accounting office or a kid who just did an illegal sideshow on the Lodge freeway. However, they still look cool and have a ton of features for the money. 

I read some contemporary reviews (you know a car has been around a while when you have to specify what decade the review was done), and expected everyone to bash its old architecture and Chrysler interior plastics. Besides a few perfunctory negative remarks, they all praised the car. It’s kind of an anachronism these days which I like. I’ll test drive the V6 but would probably get the V8. These can be pretty cheap too.

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Cadillac CT6

Caddy Ct6

This rounds out the trio of big American four-door sedans. In comparison tests, this one always got high marks for being more athletic than it had any right to be. They look cool but I worry that it might have too much technology that could fail expensively. It’s also the most ostentatious, which isn’t totally my style. But they are cheap now and I want to test drive one.

Audi S8

2018audis8

There’s a 2013 S8 by me with just over 90k miles that’s had every maintenance item done at the dealer and WAIT WHAT ARE YOU DOING! I THOUGHT YOU WERE NO LONGER ABOUT THAT LIFE! But think of how glorious it would be! 600 horsepower!!1! Sorry! I’ll enroll in a treatment program, I have a problem. Don’t recommend this car because I’d probably get it.

CTS V-Sport

V Sport

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This is the enthusiast option. 420 horses, universal acclaim from the car press. Most are too expensive but there are a handful in my price range. I think they look just as good if not better than the new Cadillacs. 

You’ll notice these are almost all American cars. I’m not opposed to getting something Japanese or Korean. I’m not a huge fan of the looks of the early Genesis models that are in my price range. I don’t want two Honda Accords, and most Lexuses don’t do a lot for me. But if I’m missing any gems let me know in the comments.

So my life is in your hands, fellow Autopians. This may sound like a sad situation but I’m actually really looking forward to this. I can’t imagine what it would be like to have a reliable daily and only have one project car’s needs rattling around my ADHD-addled brain. I’ll probably be 10 lbs lighter. 

Case in point, while my Audi is in pieces I drove the Bonneville two hours to Saginaw for work. The day before I changed the plugs and wires because it was due and it was getting horrible gas mileage. It seemed to recognize my efforts because the multifunction wiper stalk which only had one working speed and wouldn’t turn off once the wiping started, had suddenly fixed itself. I had all my speeds and can turn the wipers off now! 

However, the GM VATS anti-theft bypass the previous owner installed flaked out on me for about 45 minutes. Normally 1-out-of-10 start attempts the car wouldn’t start so I’d have to wait a few minutes for the security light to turn off before I could turn the car on. Now it wouldn’t turn on no matter how much I coaxed it. I was worried I’d have to tow the car and enlist a friend or family member to drive four hours to get me and bring me home. The fix is a few bucks and maybe 20 minutes of time, but I haven’t had a chance to get to it. Thankfully the hundredth time was a charm and it eventually started up. These are the things I’d like to avoid.

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I’ve bared my enthusiast soul here for all to see. When it’s time to take big steps in our automotive journey, it helps to turn to the community for guidance. I’m looking forward to hearing your thoughts.

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Ian Moore
Ian Moore
9 months ago

I see a Continental a few times a week on my commute home from work, I really like it. I tried to talk my ol lady into a Chrysler 300, she liked the styling Charger better so that’s what we got. I’m not sure how the market is in Michigan, but here in western Washington you can get a Hemi 300 for the price of a V6 Charger. I really like the Charger, it drives great for its size and is decently comfortable, I’d imagine a 300 would be a nice place to soak up miles with a better focus on comfort.

Box Rocket
Box Rocket
9 months ago

Buying:
Continental is a superb choice. Understated, family-friendly for all your needs (financial and otherwise), and nearly universally cool despite being FWD-based (for those that know what it is, being so understated). It still feels more modern and futuristic than a lot of cars just coming out. Plus current Lincoln has pampering down pat. The Perfect Position seats are a revelation in the best way. The door handles are some of my favorite yet made on any car (and no need to chip ice off of it to make them move, since they’re stationary). Plus, being in Michigan you’re on its home turf in a good way. Speaking of, I believe remote start is standard or close to it on all Continentals, AND most/all? have the air conditioned seats, which are so lovely in the summer.

I’d suggest the Volvo V60 as well. Much better than the tourX, and less finicky than the other Europeans on your list. Just get one with the smallest wheel option available, as the ones with large wheels ride a bit firm (duh). Volvo also has the best go-to seats in the industry: while they’re not as adjustable as the Lincoln Perfect Position seats nor as plush as a Rolls-Royce and Bentley, they just work (thanks to being designed with spinal doctors involved). I’m admittedly slightly biased as I recently did nearly 1,500 miles in my own Volvo and needed no recovery, and rest breaks were for bathroom stops, not discomfort. The biggest downside is that you have to do remote start through the On Call app, but on the plus side if you and the car both have an internet connection you can remote-start the car from anywhere, no need to be in range of the fob.

The V90 also exists, but I like the styling of the 60 more, and the 60 technically has more room in the cargo area because it’s more rectangular.

If you didn’t already have the Accord I’d suggest a Mazda6, but there’s little reason to have two “regular” Japanese sedan daily-drivers in your situation.

Possibly consider a Lexus GS, and possibly a Genesis G80. Being RWD-based they’ll be more fun, and are much more reliable (generally). I know Lexuses don’t do much for you (fair) they’re the industry benchmark for a reason. I get where you’re coming from with the Genesis styling, but once you’re inside you don’t see it.

Maybe also look at an Alfa Romeo Guilia, if you want to be different.

I’d skip the Chrysler. Too easily stolen.

Do you consider the Ford Flex to be a wagon or crossover? Because you can get one with the same grin-inducing powertrain as the Taurus SHO. They’re definitely roomy and comfortable. Lots of them within budget, too, in a variety of colors and trims.

Selling:
Get rid of the truck and the bonerville. Neither are that special, and while I too have a soft spot for the SSEi for similar reasons, that one isn’t anywhere near an example worth keeping. And from a safety standpoint you and your family need something made more recently.

Get rid of the Audi. It’s not even worth a consideration.

The BMW would be worth keeping if it weren’t for the rust. If you can sell it for $12K+, more power to you. That’ll make an excellent down payment on the family car.

Box Rocket
Box Rocket
9 months ago
Reply to  Box Rocket

Oh, are there any Jaguar XF Sportbrakes in your area in budget?

CMDCDY
CMDCDY
9 months ago

Turbo legacy, great in the snow, reliable, comfortable, good on gas, and spacious

Stef Schrader
Stef Schrader
9 months ago

The Real Answer Is Always Cayenne

Signed,
Person who needs a Cayenne

Box Rocket
Box Rocket
9 months ago
Reply to  Stef Schrader

Cayenne isn’t a car. And one that’s in his budget sounds scary.

What about a panamera with a cargo area full of puffalumps?

Stef Schrader
Stef Schrader
9 months ago
Reply to  Box Rocket

I’m feeling free to make suggestions here. A Cayenne isn’t a car, but often drives like a car. It’s comfy, it’s roomy, and it’s a running joke carried over from Jalopnik’s WCSYB? for me. Panameras are fine, but the early cars’ bubble butt isn’t my thing. I recommend the Puffalumps, either way.

STEPHEN WALTER GOSSIN
STEPHEN WALTER GOSSIN
9 months ago

As one of two Chrysler 300 owners here on the team (the other being Mark Tucker), you know what I’m choosing.

I dig your style, New Guy! Cheers.

Myk El
Myk El
9 months ago

I find the Tour X very tempting. Of the options there, it’s what I’d go with. But I also like the Lincoln.

JDE
JDE
9 months ago

You will miss the C10 immediately after it is gone. But I get it, bags in a state prone to winter without 4wd is not ideal. the Pontiac should be retained and continue to be used for daily driving, until at least Michigan Salt eat the metal complete under the plastic lower panels. Audi can go, but the early 5 series is a good one to keep. they also increase in value quite a lot.

The Tour X is pretty compelling as they are pretty cheap currently and quite handsome for a wagon. If you went 300 in Michigan I would definitely look for an AWD variant. Kind of wish they continued to make the v-8 AWD C’s but that is wishful thinking of mine for the past few years. Still a 2014 AWD V8 is not a completely impossibly thing to find. I would only go with the Lincoln if it were pretty low miles and had the rare suicide doors. https://www.cars.com/vehicledetail/8be4a4d1-c4ce-443b-8099-306f43ad7a7a/ because while I like the idea of SHO performance, I am not pleased with the design engineers placement of the water pump on Transverse mounted Ford Ecoboost motors.

I am strangely drawn tot he Genesis G70/G80 when considering powerful and possibly fun family cars. I am not completely sold on longevity of the Korean Brands still, but they seems to be doing better than some these days and the stinger in Cadillac clothing seems like a really fun ride.

Frederick Tanujaya
Frederick Tanujaya
9 months ago

GET THAT S8 NEAR YOUR DEALER.

Ps : get it checked at a mechanic to make sure its all done and right

Scott Ross
Scott Ross
9 months ago

Go for the regal tour x. I want one, I’m a boomer trapped in a millennials body…not really but, I want a turbo 4 with Awd that isn’t a Subaru or Audi, just to be different. Glad you’re keeping the Pontiac good choice. I’m still mad at my mom for trading hers in for a s10 blazer

Steve Balistreri
Steve Balistreri
9 months ago
Reply to  Scott Ross

Thanks! Thats what I’m leaning towards.

Doug Nale
Doug Nale
9 months ago

Get rid of all of it. I like the tour-x and failed to convince my wife on one for her. The Continental I love and have driven a few and I love it. The only other one I could get behind is the V. I’d also throw in a Porsche cayenne. Could be fun!

Rollin Hand
Rollin Hand
9 months ago

1) Jettison everything but the Bonneville. From the way you wrote this, it’s the only one you love and would regret selling.

2) Of the cars you mentioned, get the Tour X. It’s the most family friendly by a long shot. I had a 300 for a while, which was fine, and would also be a decent choice. Worth noting, AWD was available.

3) Outside your suggestions: you have a family, so minivan. We have a 2014 Sienna. It is a bitch to drive in parking lots, but is otherwise a brilliant family car.

But…if you insist on a car, may I suggest a recent Honda Accord Sport? Acres of space, great on gas, reliable, and with the 2.0T, it’s damn quick enough.

I would suggest against the Lincoln. That’s a really complex car to fix with the twin turbos, drinks a fair amount of premium gas, and gives you not much more of anything than the Accord.

Steve Balistreri
Steve Balistreri
9 months ago
Reply to  Rollin Hand

Thanks for the suggestions! We only have one kid and don’t have any others on the horizon so I’m going to try to keep the minivan at bay for now. We actually have a 18 Accord sport 2.0T with the 6 speed for my wife’s car. I figured we needed at least one reliable vehicle. Its the perfect family car and she loves it. I’m starting to think the same on the Lincoln. Simpler is probably better.

Freelivin2713
Freelivin2713
9 months ago

Keep the C10! Also get Lincoln Continental

VermonsterDad
VermonsterDad
9 months ago

I would keep the Bonnie. . .For the daily. . .hum. . .Focus ST, fun, hatchbacky. . .I kinda thought the Mini Clubmans we kinda cool (well aleast the rear doors are cool)or. . .

You could always van-man and get a Dad minivan, checks a lot of boxes. I secretly think minivans are cool, especially when the are all blacked out (live you inner Mr. T!). And if you ever talk to anyone will one, they love it.

ES
ES
9 months ago
Reply to  VermonsterDad

noooo. i dreaded going home for the holidays in my mini, and i bet a focus is as bad: short wheel base and short springs on the cement interstates north of Monroe (instead of asphalt) is really, really unpleasant. going over the seams every 10(?) yards felt like crossing rr tracks at 75 mph, over and over and over again. i think i lost a bit of interior or exterior trim on every trip.

Steve Balistreri
Steve Balistreri
9 months ago
Reply to  VermonsterDad

I used to have a Fiesta ST! It was a fantastic little car. Handled great and got over 30 MPGs no matter how I drove it. Problem was it couldn’t fit a baby seat and was pretty brutal for my hour long commute as far as ride quality and how loud it was.

MAX FRESH OFF
MAX FRESH OFF
9 months ago

Longroof! The Regal wagon is one of the few American cars I would rock, I love the way it looks. Keep the Bonnevile, ditch the rest. Also, if you are not opposed to Japanese cars, consider the Acura TSX and Madza6 wagons.

Steve Balistreri
Steve Balistreri
9 months ago
Reply to  MAX FRESH OFF

Thanks! I always liked the new Mazda 6, did this most recent gen come as a wagon? I was sad they didn’t offer the turbo engine with a manual. Its a really handsome car that is quite nice inside.

Mr Sarcastic
Mr Sarcastic
9 months ago

Sell everything but the Bonneville, as for buying you need to provide more information on what you need. Otherwise buy a Suburu wagon. Fun exciting and great in snow so a safe company vehicle with power and fun options.

Josh Turner
Josh Turner
9 months ago

Newer SHO Taurus? The big, P2 based one? Might be more fun than the Lincoln and cheaper too.

Steve Balistreri
Steve Balistreri
9 months ago
Reply to  Josh Turner

My buddy has had one of these for years and he loves it. They look pretty good in that dark blue. I will keep my eye out for one.

Box Rocket
Box Rocket
9 months ago

The slight difficulty with the Taurus – and the MKS sibling – is that it’s surprisingly cramped (relatively speaking) up front due to the tall transmission tunnel and console (the Fusion/MKZ technically have more interior volume!). I also find the ‘chopped’ roof a bit of a pain in the neck but that could be my body shape and height. I owned a Montego for a while – it’s direct predecessor, twin to the Five Hundred – and the roof shape was so much better, and the car was supremely comfortable, and with the Volvo platform felt very solid and safe.

So, in summary, if you’re considering a Taurus, get the MKS. Or just get the Continental, which is better in every way except price.

Steve Balistreri
Steve Balistreri
9 months ago
Reply to  Box Rocket

Thanks for the info. I’ve been eyeing continentals for a while. I’ve been seeing some posts about iffy reliability for random accessory items so we will see.

Shooting Brake
Shooting Brake
9 months ago

Get the CTS V-Sport, of the cars on your list it’s probably the one you will enjoy most. If you want to stick to dead reliable a Lexus IS or GS F-sport is nice (get the 8- speed auto not 6-speed) or get wild and try to track down an ISF (might need to soften the suspension a bit).

Gubbin
Gubbin
9 months ago

That BMW is triggering the project-car rule of thumb: the brief moment it’s pleasant to own is the time to sell it!

As others have noted, you can get remote-start installed on the Bonneville at any decent car-stereo shop.

Now you’re free to let your fancy fly! Or get a minivan (the most practical car there is and an ideal parts-runner) and keep an eye out for your next project.

Steve Balistreri
Steve Balistreri
9 months ago
Reply to  Gubbin

Thanks for the suggestions! The remote start will be for my daily. The Bonneville will never see salt or now. With how many of those have rusted away I feel like I’d be committing a crime if I corrupted this one.

Gubbin
Gubbin
9 months ago

Awww… I hope your Bonnie repays your kindness. 🙂

Tim Connors
Tim Connors
9 months ago

My truest thought is to let your wrenching be your fun & just get something reliable and practical. Get a Corolla Hatchback. It even fits your criteria:

1. Reliable. Yup.

2. Roomy. Not Buick roomy, but the adaptability of a hatchback is real. I’ve hauled a couch with a Honda Fit. I’ve done multi-week camping trips with kids in a Prius. Get cross bars & a roofbox too.

3. Car. Yup.

4. Comfortable. Not luxury level float, but a kind of comfort that just kind of is. Like an old t-shirt or a functioning HVAC system. It’s comfy, but you don’t think about it.

5. Remote start. If it doesn’t have it, this is a few hundred waiting to happen.

6. Fun. Hold out for a manual.

MAX FRESH OFF
MAX FRESH OFF
9 months ago
Reply to  Tim Connors

Or a Civic hatch! Mine 2020 has the Sport trim with a manual and the turbo engine from the Si. No LSD though. Fun to drive in the twisties and average about 40 MPG.

MATTinMKE
MATTinMKE
9 months ago
Reply to  MAX FRESH OFF

2019 Si owner here, can confirm.

Box Rocket
Box Rocket
9 months ago
Reply to  Tim Connors

Corolla and similar seem like they might be a bit cramped for modern car seats given that he has a 2-year old. Though just the one, so might be doable in the center.

My sister-in-law got rid of her Corolla and got a CX-5 (and adores it) because two car seats wouldn’t fit in the Toyota, nor their Elantra (but they kept that as it’s the “as needed” commuter car for her husband who is primarily WFH).

Vic Vinegar
Vic Vinegar
9 months ago

Thinking the Bonnie SSEI in green with gold rims was a cool ass car in the 90’s is something I can definitely relate to.

For the new car, I always have a hard time picking the car with the trunk instead of the wagon/hatchback. Probably lean Tour X for that reason, although I admit the idea of cruising in comfort (with power on tap) in the Conti is appealing too.

Steve Balistreri
Steve Balistreri
9 months ago
Reply to  Vic Vinegar

Cant go wrong with the green and gold!

B85S5DSG
B85S5DSG
9 months ago

Sell everything, mortgage the house, drain your kid’s college savings, and get an RS6.

Mr Sarcastic
Mr Sarcastic
9 months ago
Reply to  B85S5DSG

Maybe dump wife and kids empty all savings buy your dream car in thevislands.

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