Home » Like So Many Australians, The Rivian R1T Is Heading To The Mines

Like So Many Australians, The Rivian R1T Is Heading To The Mines

Mevco Rivian Mine Truck Ts
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Where Australia’s economic fortunes once rested largely on its agricultural industry, these days, it’s all about what you can dig out of the ground. If you want to make good money, many will tell you to head up the mines to make your fortune. Rivian is set to follow that example, as the company’s R1T pickup truck will soon be working in the mines Down Under.

Rivian isn’t pursuing this alone. Instead, it’s partnered with the Mining Electric Vehicle Company (MEVCO) to help make inroads into the sector. MEVCO will customize the R1T to suit mining operations, and support customers with maintenance and charging infrastructure as well.

Vidframe Min Top
Vidframe Min Bottom

There are few environments as harsh as a mine site, but EVs do promise one major benefit in this application. They have no tailpipe emissions to speak of, which can be a benefit in underground mines where ventilation is always a challenge. MEVCO also claims that operating costs and maintenance should be lower compared to typical fossil-fueled vehicles used on mine sites.

Mevco Rivian

MEVCO’s website amusingly notes some of the finer features of the R1T, including Alexa and Spotify integration. One suspects that’s not of prime concern to mining customers, but it’s listed nonetheless. Beyond that, the company notes the 135 kWh NCA lithium battery, with a 106 kWh LFP battery expected down the line. The latter would be a cost-reduced option, with LFP batteries also offering a greater margin of safety when it comes to thermal runaway as well.

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The Rivian R1T is not yet available in Australia, and right-hand-drive models are not yet in production. MEVCO’s demo vehicles are left-hand-drive examples. For off-road use on mining sites, this would not be a problem. The company’s website currently advertises the AWD dual motor and AWD quad motor trims of the R1T. Reports thus far have focused on the R1T, but graphics on the company’s website also feature a Rivian van wearing a lime green MEVCO wrap. Longer-term plans may involve bringing the van to Australia as well.

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MEVCO is a relatively new company, having been founded in 2022. Thus far, it’s focused its efforts on the Toyota Hilux, offering EV-converted models customized for mining use. These vehicles have been built in partnership with Melbourne company SEA Electric. Western Australian mining company MinRes was the first company to take delivery of the converted pickups last year.

It’s easy to see the appeal of an electric Hilux, given that so many mine sites across Australia rely on the model. However, MEVCO may find that a pure EV is an easier sell for customers who may not want to rely on a Toyota with an aftermarket drivetrain conversion.

Screenshot 2024 05 15 At 6.50.50 am

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Getting EVs into mine sites could be a very smart move for Rivian. It would do a lot to convince the Australian market that the R1T is a truck that can deal with any rough-and-tumble job out there, by putting it in the same conversation as the Toyota Hilux and 70 Series Land Cruiser.

It’s early days yet, but we’ll be watching this one with interest. Seeing a consumer EV pickup go down into the depths of an Aussie mine is one thing. We can’t wait to see what they look like when they come back again.

Image credits: Mevco

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Silent But Deadly
Silent But Deadly
2 days ago

I’ve been wondering how long it would take to see this story would take to hit the front page.

Sean Ellery
Sean Ellery
3 days ago

Many of the big mining trucks and especially the trains (longest in the world btw) are already electric. Their diesel engines are basically just gigantic generators for the electric power train and don’t directly drive the truck/train itself.

Cheap Bastard
Cheap Bastard
3 days ago

“Like So Many Australians, The Rivian R1T Is Heading To The Mines”

I’m not surprised. A mine is probably the safest place to be in a land where nature is constantly trying to kill you.

MrLM002
MrLM002
3 days ago

It’s definitely not a work Truck, it’s a Corporate show Pickup

Mustang 'DontHitTheCrowd' GT
Mustang 'DontHitTheCrowd' GT
3 days ago

There was a youtuber whose name I can’t remember who pointed out that the sliding truck bed mechanism/cover that operates when you open the tailgate momentarily leaves the innards of the truck bed open (right next to the battery). They had noticed on theirs (after a year), gravel and such had gotten down in there, and actually caused a plant to grow (new level of green, amirite?). Anyway, every time I see an article about this truck being used in a site, I wonder about that.

PresterJohn
PresterJohn
3 days ago

The EVs yearn for the mines

Mike B
Mike B
3 days ago
Reply to  PresterJohn

All they need are some child drivers.

EDIT: Never mind, AU probably still has child labor laws.

Last edited 3 days ago by Mike B
Clear_prop
Clear_prop
3 days ago

The R1T is way too fancy for mine work and way too fragile ($45k fender bender).

They should use the Rivian van, and send over a chassis cab version if a pickup/ute/flatbed version is needed.

Lally Singh
Lally Singh
3 days ago
Reply to  Clear_prop

.. or not fix the small dents in the fenders.. They’re mining trucks.

Clear_prop
Clear_prop
3 days ago
Reply to  Lally Singh

The $45k fender bender was a small dent that tweaked the entire truck.

Unibody and an environment where it is likely to get hit often don’t go together well.

Mike B
Mike B
3 days ago
Reply to  Clear_prop

It probably still doesn’t matter; these are likely to never be driven on public roads or hit any high speeds.

Lally Singh
Lally Singh
3 days ago
Reply to  Clear_prop

The problem was that the rear fender part is gigantic, and goes through the back to the other side of the truck. If you don’t care about the cosmetics of a dent, the outer metal’s not exactly functional.

Greg R
Greg R
3 days ago
Reply to  Clear_prop

Mines and most other industrial industries in Australia, tend to use tray back utes, not tubs, so a cab chassis version would definitely be preferable.

Nick Fortes
Nick Fortes
3 days ago

While they are at it, they should make some Rivian Baywatch lifeguard trucks. Just don’t run them too close to the surf. I accidentally ran my Grasshopper into the surf years ago and it took a lot of rinsing with clean fresh water to get the ESC and electronics working again lol

OldJackBurton
OldJackBurton
3 days ago

Whats the charging infrastructure like in Australia?

Thevenin
Thevenin
3 days ago
Reply to  OldJackBurton

Not great, but the mines typically install their own on-site infrastructure, including power lines, transformers, etc.

Sean Ellery
Sean Ellery
3 days ago
Reply to  OldJackBurton

Mines have their own power stations

DadBod
DadBod
3 days ago

I imagine every Rivian delivered to a mine will be claimed by a supervisor, and the people doing actual work will continue to rely on whatever piece of shit they already have.

Sean Ellery
Sean Ellery
3 days ago
Reply to  DadBod

Landcruisers and Hilux’s

Acevedo12
Acevedo12
3 days ago

I gotta imagine the maintenance alone is worth it for EV mine trucks. All the crud found in Sarah-n-tune’s ex-mine truck build was crazy to watch. It’s must wreak havoc on just about every moving part, especially the air filters and cooling.

Thevenin
Thevenin
3 days ago
Reply to  Acevedo12

Depending on the type of mine, I’d think the lack of carbon monoxide could also be a big selling point by itself.

10001010
10001010
3 days ago

I know it’s a wrap but that R1T looks great in lime green. Rivian should offer that as a color.

BolognaBurrito
BolognaBurrito
3 days ago

When are posting pictures going to work? I want to post some seagulls from Finding Nemo so bad right now…

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