Home » Nissan Once Sold A Van So Broken That It Had To Buy All Of Them Back Due To Potential Fiery Death

Nissan Once Sold A Van So Broken That It Had To Buy All Of Them Back Due To Potential Fiery Death

Nissan Van Unholy Fail Ts
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The cars of the 1980s and 1990s are enjoying a renaissance right now. Those who grew up in the Radwood era finally have cash to spend and they’re going home with everything from Acura Legends to forward control minivans. One van you might have a hard time finding is the Nissan Van. Pitched as a no-compromise luxury van, Nissan gave the U.S. versions bigger engines. But Nissan screwed up as those engines ended up running hot, so hot that some even caught fire. Others just didn’t work right and Nissan was so embarrassed that it tried to buy all of the Vans back.

Multiple readers pitched this one-box weirdo after our last Unholy Fails entry. Your wish is our command!

Vidframe Min Top
Vidframe Min Bottom

There was once a time when the minivan was as revolutionary as the crossover. Vans have long been a staple of American culture, but the 1984 Chrysler minivans started a new era of family vehicles. The Dodge Caravan, the Chrysler Town and Country, and the Plymouth Voyager became sensations as Americans moved out of wagons and into spacious people carriers.

The Chrysler minivans were such a stroke of genius that other automakers scrambled to offer something that could even be in the same ballpark. Chevrolet tried to market its Chevrolet Astro and GMC Safari as minivans that could do work and haul loads the Chryslers couldn’t. Ford took a similar path with its Aerostar. In reality, the rest of Detroit was playing catch-up in the game of the garageable van.

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General Motors got closer with its late 1980s ‘dustbuster’ vans. It took Ford until 1995 to finally adopt a layout similar to a Chrysler van with the Windstar.

The import brands were also in this race with funky forward control vans. The Toyota Van (TownAce) was on sale before Chrysler’s vans while Mitsubishi gave us the Wagon (Delica) for a short period beginning in 1987. Toyota returned again in 1991 with the Previa and Honda joined in 1994 with the Odyssey. Before that, Honda sold a sort of van-like wagon version of the Civic called the Civic Wagovan. Renault was even considering sending us its Espace to throw into the popular minivan pile. And don’t forget Mazda with its quirky MPV.

1987 Nissan Vanette Dsc 4635 706
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Nissan had a couple of irons in the fire. There was the Nissan Stanza Wagon, which was combined traits of a wagon and a minivan into one. Its other 1980s minivan effort was the Nissan Van. Yes, Nissan and Toyota named their North American minivans just “Van.” I love how simple the names of Japanese imports were in America back then.

The Nissan Van, known elsewhere as the Vanette, couldn’t compete with Chrysler’s iconic vans. Instead, it would try to be the luxury pick. Instead, it would be the fiery one. Nissan would end up destroying most Vans, but unlike the Copper-Cooled Chevrolet, you can still buy a Nissan Van.

Born From Trucks

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Before we talk about fire, let’s look at Nissan’s more obscure truck and van history.

For this one, we’re going back to the 1950s. Japan’s workers drove three-wheeled trucks as the nation got back on its feet after World War II. These little trucks were simple, yet practical, leading three-wheelers to a 72 percent market share of the Japanese truck market by 1953. However, as Japan advanced, those three-wheeled trucks fell out of vogue.

Japan’s automakers responded by making the descendants of today’s trucks. Mazda had a four-wheeled truck on Japanese roads in 1950 while Toyota launched the Toyopet SKB in 1954. These trucks were a step forward compared to the three-wheelers used before and after the war, but still simple machines. For example, the Toyopet featured a ladder frame, a leaf spring suspension, and a side-valve engine that at first didn’t even make 30 HP.

DATSUN CABLIGHT002

The Datsun Cablight made its debut in 1958. Nissan had constructed trucks for decades before the Cablight, but the Cablight was one of the trucks to lead the firm’s post-war charge. According to archived brochure pages from the era, trucks like the Cablight were intentionally simplistic to create a practical, yet affordable vehicle. Keep in mind that this was around the time that the Japanese government wanted to get the nation on wheels with the development of a people’s car.

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Those brochures also detail some of the features of the Cablight. Datsun boasted its Cablight as having a roomy interior, the first synchronized four-speed transmission in its class, and parts commonality with Datsun passenger cars, including the front suspension. Datsun further sold that as a benefit as having a car suspension meant the Cablight rode like a car and the car parts meant easy service. Further, Datsun’s choice to go with a semi cabover-type design also meant easy maneuvering on tight streets.

DATSUN CABLIGHT004

Cablight 2

Like other trucks of the era, the Cablight was powered by an itty bitty engine. In this case, the Cablight had an 860cc side-valve inline-four making all of 27 HP. It should also be noted that this wasn’t the only truck Datsun sold at the time. There was also the Datsun Truck 220 series, which was a more conventional affair positioned upmarket from the Cablight.

To further illustrate how simple the Cablight was, you should know about its features, or lack thereof. Cablight drivers didn’t have a fuel gauge. Instead, they inserted a rod into the fuel tank to check fuel level. Other cost-cutting was found in the fact that the passenger side of the truck had a manual windshield wiper and the metal-framed seats had more in common with a park bench than a vehicle.

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The Cablight was a commercial success for Datsun and the company continued developing it into a better truck over the years. A second generation was introduced in 1961 and a third generation followed in 1964.

Some Japanese sites claim that the van version of the Cablight had Japan’s first-ever sliding door mechanism on a production van. As Curbside Classic notes, Datsun scooped up Tokyu Kogyo Kurogane in the 1960s and with that acquisition came a truck and van line. The Cablight became a variation of the Kurogane Mighty and the truck’s run ended in 1968 when it was replaced by the Cabstar.

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The larger Cabstar left a hole in Datsun’s lineup for a smaller, more affordable truck. In response, the Datsun Sunny Cab was introduced in 1969 as a variation of the Datsun Sunny. Once again, the Sunny Cab was a truck and a van borrowing its bones and components from a passenger car. In this case, the Sunny Cab borrows its 1000cc engine, wishbone front suspension, and leaf springs from the Sunny. The Sunny Cab Van version of this truck was available in two-, five-, and eight-passenger configurations, but the sliding door from the Cabstar van did not make a return.

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The van we’re looking at today launched in 1978 as the 1979 Vanette. Like the van’s predecessors, its mission was simple: Get people someplace else economically. Early Vanettes featured that cab-forward layout with its engine under the front seats that drove the rear wheels.

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Like its predecessors, the Vanette also borrowed from the passenger car parts bin and featured shocks up front and leaf springs in the rear. These were still pretty slow vans, too, with engines ranging from a 1.2-liter four that made 63 HP to a 2.0-liter four that made 87 HP.

Bring The Fire Department

Nissan’s response to the onslaught of minivans would be the second-generation Vanette. This van went on sale in 1985 before originally petering out in 1994. Then, Malaysia picked up production in 1997 and kept making the vans until 2010. Talk about a long run!

U S Market Van Nissan Brochure I

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This van was built as a contemporary to the Toyota LiteAce and the Mitsubishi Delica. Once again, you got an engine sort of in a mid-mounted arrangement and driving the rear wheels. The idea behind the Vanette, similar to its competition in Japan, was to offer something bigger than a Kei van, but smaller and more affordable than a larger commercial van. These types of vans were still very popular in Japan and Nissan thought Americans would want in on the action. As Hemmings writes, the second-generation Vanette was designed and built by Aichi Kokuki, a former Kei car manufacturer Nissan picked up in its acquisition dash in the past.

Nissan knew it was going to be difficult to compete with Chrysler’s minivans, so it concocted a plan to set itself a part. The Vanette, which would be sold in America as the “Van” would be pitched as the luxury alternative. The Van would have dual air-conditioning, dual sunroofs, swivel seats, an automatic transmission, a cooler with an ice maker, a warming compartment, and bucket seats with lumbar support. The Vanette sold in the Philippines even had an optional outdoor shower.

Nissan boasted the Van’s good road manners thanks to an independent suspension up front and 5-link coil springs in the rear.

Unfortunately, there was one thing the Vanette didn’t have, and that was power. Nissan knew that Americans loved taking long-distance road trips at speed. The best engine for the Vanette was a 2.0-liter four that made 87 HP. That wasn’t going to work, but Nissan had an idea. It had a larger 2.4-liter engine that it already certified for the Datsun 720 and Nissan Hardbody on the American market. That engine could be hoisted into the Van, making a North American special.

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Nissan added those changes, as well as giving the Van a special face for America, and put it on sale in 1986 for 1987. Then, all hell broke loose.

1989 Nissan Van

Reportedly, Nissan Vans started breaking down almost immediately. Owners with less luck than that experienced engine fires. The first recall hit in July 1987 when the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said 10,000 10,000 Vans needed new valve cover gaskets. Vans impacted by the recall could experience oil leaking out of the valve cover gaskets and onto the exhaust manifolds.

This didn’t stop the fires, and three years later another recall was issued for all 33,000 Vans sold in America to replace power steering hoses. The Van ended sales in 1989, so this happened long after the last example sold.

Apparently, the hoses could fall apart, spraying power steering fluid onto the exhaust manifolds, causing a fire. Somehow, not even this stopped the Nissan Vans from getting too hot, and two more recalls were issued. Those recalls saw Nissan Vans getting their entire cooling systems replaced with improved parts. Vans also got an auxiliary electric fan and power steering fluid cooler.

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Unfortunately, Nissan then discovered that it was more cost-effective to just buy every Van back rather than go through the process of performing the recall repairs on 33,000 units. In 1993 and 1994, Nissan launched a buyback program. Depending on condition and mileage, Nissan paid $5,000 to $7,000 to the owners of Nissan Vans to take their vehicles off of the road. This was claimed to be what their retail value was, or better than what those owners could have gotten on the used market. If that deal wasn’t sweet enough, Nissan also gave those owners a $500 to $1,000 discount on a used or new Nissan of their choice. Vans given back to Nissan for the program were destroyed and then disposed of.

In the aftermath, the Los Angeles Times claimed that the Nissan Van was such a disaster that it was the first car to be recalled four times in an attempt to stop one problem from happening. The program also cost Nissan over $200 million in the buyback program alone, and who knows how much more in the handful of class-action suits that were filed against Nissan.

1988 Nissan Brochure 18 (1)

You’ll notice I didn’t say how much power the engine made. All of this was over an engine that made 106 HP, not even a full 20 horses better than an engine that the van was made to use. The Van hit 60 mph in a leisurely 19 seconds in MotorWeek‘s testing. The legendary John Davis called the Van “embarrassingly slow.”

Somewhere around 153 Nissan Van fires were reported in the 1980s. Thankfully, no fatalities were reported. That “fiery death” in the headline is a nod to an old joke for those of you who have been reading our content for long enough. That’s not bad in terms of pure numbers, but enough to trigger this whole headache. Again, all of this happened because of a barely better engine. What’s worse is that the Vanette was not known for fires in other markets, so it would appear that Nissan screwed up in sticking a pickup truck engine into a tiny hole in which it didn’t belong.

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1987 1990 Nissan Van Us Front

Also thankfully, not everyone bought into the buyback program. Some people got their recalled Nissan Vans fixed and kept them on the road, anyway. They sometimes show up in junkyards and for sale online. I found just one for sale in America and it’s listed for $8,300, down from $13,000.

The whole Nissan Van saga is a sad one because if it weren’t for the engine’s desire for self-immolation, the van could have been something really neat. Maybe not as awesome as a Chrysler van, but it’s something awesome for this new Rad era. Thankfully, not all of them are gone, so there is a chance you could see one of these vans one day!

(Images: Manufacturers, unless otherwise noted.)

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Bill
Bill
20 days ago

Really enjoyed this article, thanks!

Robert Runyon
Robert Runyon
20 days ago

What a wealth of information here. This is, by far, the most interesting auto site, a Radavist/ Bike Snob for cars. If you’re really a motion geek, then you’ve got to check out the above sites. My wife even likes the shirt.

Doug
Doug
21 days ago

Worked at a upstate NY dealership when the Van episodes happened. Maybe we were far enough North to miss the worst of these potential fire risks, but I never saw one go up in flames and never saw any burnt remains after the fact. What I do remember are some really sad customers who LOVED the damn things and had to be persuaded to take the buy back deals. One in particular took the buy back and got himself into a Maxima w/o a payment book. His comment? ‘No refrigerator in the console’ (and yes, they called it a cooler, but it was a godamn fridge capable of freezing ice in the console!) I have a picture somewhere of 3 or 4 of them sitting on the back lot, waiting for their trip to the crusher.. its a shame they didnt figure out ALL the overheat issues the 1st time around, because after all the recalls I believe the issues were all addressed. That Z24 4 cyl. was a good engine in the pickups, and the A/Ts in those days were bulletproof. Damn, I’d drive one if I could find one!

GreatFallsGreen
GreatFallsGreen
22 days ago

A potentially rarer-still van: the Mazda-derived Kia Besta, sold through Mazda dealers in Canada briefly, just before the original MPV and years before Kia’s arrival to the U.S. – which was a few years before their actual arrival to Canada.

Beached Wail
Beached Wail
22 days ago

This van and others of its era had another risk aside from fiery death, as explained by Volvo in the late ’80s:

Volvo ran a print ad for the 740 wagon that pointed out how the US Department of Transportation didn’t classify minivans as passenger cars so they didn’t have to meet passenger car safety standards.

The ad mentions Volvo’s front crumple zone and includes this brutal comparison:

“The front end of some minivans include impact absorbing components of a slightly different nature. Your legs.”

(My family had a ’64 Falcon Club Wagon (Econoline) as a family hauler and it made this Nissan look like a Sherman tank. Not sure to this day how we all survived.)

Stryker_T
Stryker_T
22 days ago

slightly absurd claims of “fiery death!” was one of my favorite running gags.

Hangover Grenade
Hangover Grenade
22 days ago

A few months ago, I posed a question on Reddit: “Is there a mass-market car with zero examples left?” I began reading this article full of hope for finding the answer. Alas….

Vetatur Fumare
Vetatur Fumare
22 days ago

The non-coupé Nissan Pulsar (N12) is a candidate. 3/5-door hatchback, only sold in 1983 in the US for some reason. Curbside Classic saw one in 2019:
https://www.curbsideclassic.com/curbside-classics-asian/curbside-classic-1983-nissan-pulsar-five-door-so-rare-i-forgot-it-existed/

Peanut
Peanut
22 days ago
Reply to  Vetatur Fumare

That was my first car, in 1991. I loved Pulsar NXs and my dad found a Pulsar for sale. It was not the Pulsar I wanted but the one I could afford.

Vetatur Fumare
Vetatur Fumare
21 days ago
Reply to  Peanut

Ooooooohhhhhh. You sound disappointed. 🙂 I would be forever in your debt if you uploaded a picture of this mythical beast to Wikipedia. (any self respecting Autopian member has photos of every car they ever owned, and knows where said photos are)

Peanut
Peanut
21 days ago
Reply to  Vetatur Fumare

I do have a photo of it but I’ve never uploaded to Wikipedia before. I will see if I can figure out how to do that. it looks exactly like the one in the link but dull red instead of white. I didn’t know it was “rare”. I drove it from 1991-96, then the transmission was going bad, but it was totaled in an accident before it could die of natural causes.

Peanut
Peanut
21 days ago
Reply to  Vetatur Fumare

It has been uploaded to Wikimedia Commons

Vetatur Fumare
Vetatur Fumare
17 days ago
Reply to  Peanut

Amaaaaaaazing! My brother is getting married on Friday, but this may remain the best thing that happened to me this week!!!

ClutchAbuse
ClutchAbuse
22 days ago

So many of life’s problems are caused by sticking things in holes they don’t belong in.

M0L0TOV
M0L0TOV
22 days ago

When I lived in Okinawa in the early 80’s we had a canary yellow first gen Nissan Vanette. I absolutely loved the jump seat in the second row and that was my spot. There was a Western theme park there where you could park your vehicle under a giant sombrero. Somewhere, we have pictures of it. Also, the Vanette was also manufactured in Spain and you’d see a lot of them driving up and down the roads in diesel form. The Nissan Serena was manufactured there as well but sold as the Nissan Vanette.

Logan King
Logan King
23 days ago

Maine’s Greatest Enemy: Origins

Last edited 23 days ago by Logan King
Trust Doesn't Rust
Trust Doesn't Rust
23 days ago

Now, my experience with cab-over vehicles is very limited. However, I have to imagine that if these things were running so hot that they were overheating, the driver and passenger seat area had to be exceptionally uncomfortable on a regular basis (exponentially moreso once it caught fire). I’m not sure what the thermal insulation situation is with these types of vehicles but engine heat has to be noticeable.

AlterId
AlterId
22 days ago

Since Nissan wanted this to have luxury appeal, naturally they included heated seats.

Eggsalad
Eggsalad
23 days ago

The almost 20 second 0-60 test was probably conducted with just 1 person in the Van. Now imagine adding 6 passengers.

Ranwhenparked
Ranwhenparked
23 days ago
Reply to  Eggsalad

Imagine adding 6 *American* passengers, at about +80% of the curb weight

Hangover Grenade
Hangover Grenade
22 days ago
Reply to  Ranwhenparked

We were a lot less fat in the 1980s.

Tim Cougar
Tim Cougar
23 days ago

Over on IMCDb we have barely a dozen US-market Nissan Vans, most from before 1994, but we do have one that showed up in a 2006 movie: https://www.imcdb.org/vehicle_656753-Nissan-Van-C22-1987.html

James Carson
James Carson
23 days ago

My kid has a 97 Nissan Homy Elgrand. Yes that is the real name of the thing. Quite a nice machine. Helped him replace the diesel injector pump last year.

It’s not one if these, but an interesting machine.

Last edited 23 days ago by James Carson
Professor Chorls
Professor Chorls
23 days ago

Yes…. yes… the last Legendary Shitty Van I still have to add to my Pokevan collection. I had a chance to buy one over a decade ago when Ye Olde Lighting Website had an article able one in North Carolina. Unfortunately then, I was not in a position to have more than one terrible van.

But now that’s changed. However, I’ve long lost the contact info of the seller.

Mrbrown89
Mrbrown89
23 days ago

This van was called Ichivan in Mexico, I remember these when I was kid. I don’t remember them being so bad lol

Vetatur Fumare
Vetatur Fumare
22 days ago
Reply to  Mrbrown89

Nissan Mexico had some of the most hilarious names in the industry. Nissan Ninja Turbo comes to mind.
Was Tsubame a pun of some sort? I seem to remember it meaning “load me up” or something while also being Japanese for wood swallow, but now I can’t find anything about it.

Eric Gonzalez
Eric Gonzalez
23 days ago

Hey Mercedes, I mentioned this in a comment in your previous article. Not sure if you got the idea from there or if brilliant minds think alike, but here it is:

https://www.theautopian.com/chevy-once-made-a-car-so-bad-it-had-to-recall-and-then-destroy-almost-every-example/#comment-403523

Happy to answer any question about these Vanettes as we had it at home for over 10 years, with absolutely no issues.

The larger engine made just 20hp over its international power plant, but more importantly, it had more torque and interestingly 2 spark plugs per cylinder. Motorweek’s 19 seconds to 60mph was probably true but also don’t tell the whole story. The van was geared for city driving and felt peppy at slower speeds, plus ours had a manual, so up to 45-50mph it was perfectly capable, even loaded. It was so light on the rear axle that when unloaded it would spin its wheels on anything remotely slippery, so it tried to kill you on damp roads. This was back when ABS and airbags were not a thing.

I also recall how hot it always got under your gonads, obviously a telltale sign of the terrible engine choice under your crotch, but again, it never failed on us. Never had any of its recalls done as it was exported as a used car well before the whole clusterfuck ensued. Maybe we were lucky, maybe the issue was overblown. We will never know.

Ours was that dark/light blue color with the cooler and the rear AC. Sadly no captain chairs on the back, just regular bench seats.

Last edited 23 days ago by Eric Gonzalez
Eric Gonzalez
Eric Gonzalez
23 days ago

They were crude vans with weird design choices. As Mr Regular said, Nissan has always been the Pepsi to the Toyota Coke. In this case the Pepsi caught fire. The few that I still see on the road around here have been swapped with diesel engines, not because they combusted spontaneously, but because parts for them are non-existent.

Dogisbadob
Dogisbadob
23 days ago

It’s funny because when the Nissan Vans were new and catching fire, that’s around the time Renault left the US, and the Renault/Eagle Medallion (21) had about the same reputation, even breaking during journalists’ test drives.

And now they work even closer together! 😛

So much for kaizen continuous improvement LOL

The fires were probably related to cooling issues in the van’s hood, a little more difficult than a regular car’s hood (airflow or something). The modern day Chrysler Pacifica suffers from overheating shit too.

I also like how we only got the Axxess in 1990, while Canada got it for another 5 years!

LTDScott
LTDScott
23 days ago

Per the latest IIHS data I have access to, there are still 147 of these still registered on the road, which is pretty amazing to me.

Matt Sexton
Matt Sexton
23 days ago
Reply to  LTDScott

Small favor to ask, but can you do the ’91 Yugo GV Plus? I have one, and the last time someone with the capability ran the numbers for me, it came back as 46. Interested to know what it is now.

LTDScott
LTDScott
22 days ago
Reply to  Matt Sexton

Interestingly Yugo isn’t on my list at all. I know for a fact there are still some out on the road.

Matt Sexton
Matt Sexton
22 days ago
Reply to  LTDScott

Well, Jason and I both have 91’s, so that’s at least two. 🙂

I’m in a Yugo FB group and there’s more of us than you’d imagine, but the ’90-’91 injected Plus models are not very commonly represented.

M0L0TOV
M0L0TOV
22 days ago
Reply to  LTDScott

Welp, you opened up a whole can of worms. Any word on how many Mazda MX-6’s from the 88-92 are floating around?

LTDScott
LTDScott
22 days ago
Reply to  M0L0TOV

1,634

TriangleRAD
TriangleRAD
23 days ago

Amazing how you can take a perfectly reliable and durable engine like the Z24E, and turn in into a nightmare by trying mis-applying it.

All this talk of Nissan trying to compete with Chrysler got me to thinking…long history, perpetually overshadowed by its two larger competitors, occasional flashes of brilliance, multiple ownership changes, depending on risky and aggressive financing to get them through hard times…Nissan is quite obviously the Chrysler of Japan.

Eric Gonzalez
Eric Gonzalez
23 days ago
Reply to  TriangleRAD

It was in fact a revision of the Z24i with TBi and a twin spark head for emissions and a bit of extra power. First gen Pathfinders also used this engine for some years.

It was fun doing maintenance on this engine by the diminutive access port under the seat, now imagine replacing 8 plugs. A lot of people just eliminated the 2nd set of plugs:

https://www.nissanpathfinders.net/forum/topic/31697-changing-twin-spark-z24-to-single-spark/

Cam.man67
Cam.man67
23 days ago
Reply to  TriangleRAD

I’ve always thought Mitsubishi the Chrysler of Japan, but I think you’re onto something. If Nissan is Chrysler, then I guess that bumps Mitsu to, what, AMC? That more or less tracks.

TXJeepGuy
TXJeepGuy
23 days ago
Reply to  Cam.man67

Mitsu did make a couple cool sports cars and SUV’s for a bit, and now its working with Nissan… definitely AMC.

Nic Periton
Nic Periton
23 days ago

There is a technical term for this sort of thing, “Ooops” It is underused these days.

R53forfun
R53forfun
23 days ago

Well, hot damn.

Autonerdery
Autonerdery
23 days ago

The linked LA Times article is a neat archival piece. I was wondering when the buyback push happened, because I was trying to think of the last time I had seen a Nissan Van, and I landed around 1993, so that tracked. (The buybacks happened in 1993-94, in case anyone else doesn’t want to have to click through.)

I imagine Nissan didn’t want to ever publicize anything about this debacle, but I’d be curious to know if it ever came out how many of the Vans they ended up buying back.

Last edited 23 days ago by Autonerdery
Ranwhenparked
Ranwhenparked
23 days ago
Reply to  Autonerdery

I didn’t pay much attention to really any modern cars as a kid, but the last one I can recall seeing was in the parking lot of a failed Chinese fast casual franchise prototype around 1995 or ’96 (China Jump, in Montgomery County, PA).

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